Diamond
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Location: Hertfordshire

Virginia Creeper dying

Hello

I am new to this forum and I hope my question is within the correct section.

I have had a Virginia Creeper on my garden wall for over 16 years. It was beautiful with huge green leaves every summer until last year when only 1/3rd of the plant produced leaves. The rest of the branches look very brittle and dead.

I have another Virginia Creeper on my garage wall which is already beginning to show some buds, but the one on my main wall looks as though its not going to produce a thing this year. Its also covered in ladybirds at the moment for some bizarre reason.

Its a nuisance because I don't think I could ever get the Creeper off the wall as the branches have glued themselves to the bricks over the years and become well and truly stuck!

It spoils the whole look of my garden and I wonder if anyone can advise what I should do? Plant another over the top of this? try to get the branches off the wall - which I think would be nigh impossible? I wish I knew an expert who could look at the plant as I not sure of the next move.

Thanks for any help anyone can give me.

Christine

Diamond
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Location: Hertfordshire

Thanks for the ladybird advice. However, the creeper had all but died last summer before any ladybirds appeared. They are on it now. So I am not sure this is the main reason for the problem.

So I just wonder if anyone has any advice on how I can save my Virginia Creeper or is it finished! Some of the branches are so brittle today, I can snap them off :cry:

Thanks.

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hendi_alex
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If I could be so lucky! Virginia Creeper, Carolina Jasmine, honeysuckle all grow like crazy in and around my yard. It is a constant fight to keep the vines under control. I would have thought that you could just cut the vine back to near the ground and wait for it to sprout new growth. When I'm trying to kill a vine, if the smallest piece is left in the ground, the plants takes back off covering the area in as little as one season. Of course we have long hot summers here in central S.C. The vine could be much more temperamental in your cool damp climate.
Eclectic gardening style, drawing from 45 years of interest and experience. Mostly plant in raised beds and containers primarily using intensive gardening techniques.
Alex

Diamond
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Joined: Mon Mar 19, 2012 1:53 pm
Location: Hertfordshire

Hi

I could cut the creeper back at the roots but the problem is all the vine shoots/twigs have glued themselves to the brick wall and it would be almost impossible trying to scrape them off.

I did this once with an Ivy and it actually left inprints all over the wall where the plant had stuck itself to the brick. A real mess.

Out of interest, is this a UK garden forum I have found or American! Sorry if my questions are not relating to our British damp weather!!!

Thanks

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hendi_alex
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Location: Central Sand Hills South Carolina

There is quite a large U.K. group that posts at this site. Helpful Gardener is truly international with posters chiming in from all over the world. But usually one can get area specific responses when that is requested or is most appropriate.
Eclectic gardening style, drawing from 45 years of interest and experience. Mostly plant in raised beds and containers primarily using intensive gardening techniques.
Alex

WildcatNurseryman
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Location: Lexington, KY.

Alex, I was thinking the same thing. lol Now if we could get the Japanese Honeysuckle to die.

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applestar
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Location: Zone 6, NJ (3/M)4/E ~ 10/M

I would not so readily dismiss the ladybird clue since I had the exact same thought -- that the ladybirds/beetles are after something in the vines. In the stressed condition the vines are in now, they may have become attractive to some sucking pest.

Do take the time to closely inspect for ANY sucking insects, though aphids are their typical fare. If the vines are also swarming with ants, then it's a sure bet.

Only other rason for the ladybirds to be so massed is if they hibernated behind your vines and are just now emerging.

If this were to have happened in the US, my other suspicion would have been that somebody mistook the Virginia Creeper for poison ivy and sprayed them down with herbicide.

I think if you want to continue to grow them on the walls, you could easily take cuttings and propagate them this summer. It really won't take long for them to cover the walls again. But this might be an opportunity to have the walls inspected in case the clinging vines and the humid environment they would have created may have had any deleterious effects.

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