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OROZCONLECHE
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Is it Possible To Propagate Cherry Blossom

I found a Beautiful Cherry Blossom at the Farmers Market store, The Tree was in the Parking Lot so I Decided to take a Cutting (Well 3) and Try To Propagate it, But They Had told me some Trees Don't Root out, Like an Avocado Tree, Does anyone Know if it is Possible with this Tree?
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bullthistle
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Generally any woody plant can be propagated however each has its own set of rules. Some need hardwood attached, some are done in the fall, some need excessive mositure, it just depands. Google cherry, you'll have to know the species because they can be different, for cuttings.

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OROZCONLECHE
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Well My first try was googling if i can but i can't find any information about it, thats why i came here to see if anyone has ever tryed that specific tree cutting
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JONA878
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I take it by 'Cherry Blossom' Oroz..that you mean ornamental cherry and not the sweet cherries that we eat.
Prunus Rosaceae....of which there are 430 species.
As has been said it really needs to know what the var is that you admire so much.
However it might be worth having a go at something that can be done on many of them.
Nothing gained ...nothing lost I guese.
You can indeed graft them but you will need a rootstock to do this. This is normaly Prunus avium.
You can try though taking heel cuttings . 3-4 inches long in July of half-ripened shoots . Insert the cuttings in equal parts peat and sand mix with some bottom heat if possable. ( 61-64 F.)
pot on when rooted to potting compost in 3in pots and cold frame to the following spring. Then plant out to nursery rows for a further year or two before putting into a permanent position.
Because you may not find out the name of your ones...take further cuttings in August and repeat the prosess as some of the species prefer the later date.

worth having a go ..??

:?
An apple a day.....keeps me in work.

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OROZCONLECHE
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Yea im talking about the ornamental one, and i guess ill have to try it later when it gets warmer
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bullthistle
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Also use rooting hormone. They may rot the first time but keep at it. Do this in the spring before new growth.


Step 1
Cut 6- to 8-inch softwood sections of the flowering cherry tree branches with a sharp knife. Place the tender cuttings in a plastic bag with a moist paper towel to prevent them from drying out.

Step 2
Prepare a rooting medium by mixing equal portions of sterile course sand, sterile peat moss and perlite. Moisten the medium with water to make it damp but not wet and put the mixture into a rooting tray.

Step 3
Remove all leaves from the bottom halves of the flowering cherry stems and dip the cut ends into powdered rooting hormone. Gently tap the stems to remove excess hormone.

Step 4
Stick the flowering cherry stems into the rooting tray at a depth of 2 to 3 inches. Gently firm the soil around the stems to hold them in place. Space the cuttings in the tray so the leaves of each stem are not touching.

Step 5
Mist the rooting medium and flowering cherry stems with water and place a plastic bag over the tray to hold humidity around the cuttings while they are producing roots. Open the cover several times a week to introduce fresh air into the rooting environment.

Step 6
Monitor the moisture level of the rooting medium to make sure the medium and flowering cherry stems do not dry out. Spray the medium with water as needed to keep the environment damp but not wet.

Step 7
Pull lightly on the flowering cherry stem cuttings after four weeks to see if there is resistance caused by root development. Transplant the cuttings to individual 4-inch growing containers once the roots reach a length greater than one inch. Grow the cuttings in a protected environment for a minimum of one year.

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