Alternative
Newly Registered
Posts: 2
Joined: Sat Jan 20, 2007 7:27 am
Location: Las Vegas NV

Is the root system of Oleander aggressive?

Recently moved in to home where several are lined up near the block wall, and a few within a few feet from the pool equipment (i.e. filter, pump, etc.). Some are 10 feet tall, and the ones near the pool equipment are about 15 feet tall.

They're good at blocking unwanted views, but I'll get them removed if the the root system of these plants are a threat to damage the block wall, or the swimming pool plumbing.

Thanks in advance.

Newt
Greener Thumb
Posts: 1868
Joined: Wed May 26, 2004 2:44 am
Location: Maryland zone 7

Hi Alternative,

Congratulations on your new home and welcome to The Helpful Gardener. I've heard of oleander roots being invasive, especially when there is a lack of water. I do know that all parts of the plant are poisonious and children and pets should not be allowed to chew on the leaves, stems or roots.

Here's two interesting conversations that mention invasive roots if planted near sewer lines, house or pool. You might want to do some exploratory digging to see where they are. The do grow thickly matted roots.

Newt

Alternative
Newly Registered
Posts: 2
Joined: Sat Jan 20, 2007 7:27 am
Location: Las Vegas NV

Thanks for the info Newt, and for the links.

Looks like I'll need to get them removed... Any recommendations on what to replace them with, one that will provide privacy but no invasive roots?

Newt
Greener Thumb
Posts: 1868
Joined: Wed May 26, 2004 2:44 am
Location: Maryland zone 7

You are so very welcome! I get your hardiness zone as 8.

With that in mind, thinking that your site will be full to part sun, height of 6' to 15' or a bit more and you want evergreen, I've selected these. If anything is different just let me know.
Mexican orange, mock orange, Mexican orange blossom - Choisya ternata
https://www.floridata.com/ref/C/choi_ter.cfm

pagoda flower - Clerodendrum paniculatum
https://www.floridata.com/ref/C/cler_pan.cfm

Mary Nell holly, Mary Nelle holly - Ilex 'Mary Nell'
https://www.floridata.com/ref/I/ilex_mar.cfm

Burford's holly - Ilex cornuta 'Burfordii'
https://www.floridata.com/ref/I/ilx_bur.cfm

gallberry, inkberry, bitter gallberry, evergreen winterberry - Ilex glabra
https://www.floridata.com/ref/I/ilex_gla.cfm

yaupon, yaupon holly - Ilex vomitoria
https://www.floridata.com/ref/I/ilx_vom.cfm

Nellie Stevens holly - Ilex x 'Nellie R. Stevens'
https://www.floridata.com/ref/I/ilex_xne.cfm

primrose jasmine, Chinese jasmine - Jasminum mesnyi
https://www.floridata.com/ref/J/jasm_mes.cfm

loropetalum - Loropetalum chinense
https://www.floridata.com/ref/L/loro_chi.cfm

I'm sure there are others. I would suggest you check with a reputable garden center and then you can research them or ask here. Maybe others will come along with more suggestions.

Newt

gardngodess
Newly Registered
Posts: 4
Joined: Sat Dec 08, 2007 12:41 am
Location: Miami

Oleander NOT blooming after 2 years?

I have three Oleanders, two are huge and blooming, but one of them is just not blooming.
I heard that if it's not in direct sun light it won't bloom. Recently, a Certified Landscape Arborist told me that it's possible that the Oleander that don't bloom (and there are a lot of them) are male plants. That's the simple answer. And those who bloom are the female plants.
It kind of makes sense, but I wanted to run it by a few of you out there who may know more about Oleanders.

Thanks from South Florida 8)

Newt
Greener Thumb
Posts: 1868
Joined: Wed May 26, 2004 2:44 am
Location: Maryland zone 7

Hi Gardngodess,

Welcome to the Helpful Gardener. Not sure where the "Certified Landscape Arborist" read that, but Nerium oleander has both male and female flowers on the same plant, therefore it's monoecious. From Virginia Tech Dendrology at this site:
https://www.discoverlife.org/mp/20q?search=Nerium+oleander
Flower: Monoecious, very showy, 1 to 2 inches across, 5 large petals with a wide range of colors (pinks to red most common), appearing in terminal clusters in summer on new growth (although summer is peak flowering, some flowers may be present year round).
From this site which has a botanical dictionary:
https://www.botany.com/index.16.htm
MONOECIOUS: Having male and female flowers on the same plant.

DIOECIOUS: Bearing male and female flowers on separate plants, such as in holly and willow. Also dioecian.
Hope that helps.
Newt

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