buzzcut
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Posts: 42
Joined: Sat May 28, 2011 3:15 pm
Location: ne/sd

autumn blaze maple.....

two yrs ago, i planted a few abm's. doing fine but one---it's foliage isn't as dark green (almost more chartreuse) as the others and veining is noticable. from reading about plants, could be lack of iron? trees are located in the same area.

just wondering if anyone might have some tips/options?

tia

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Kisal
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Location: Oregon

I'm not a tree person, but it sounds like chlorosis. If I recall correctly, that is often caused by a deficiency of trace minerals. Sometimes, there are sufficient levels of the minerals in the soil, but for some reason, the plant can't absorb them. I know incorrect pH can do that, for one thing, but there may be other causes.
"Isn't it enough to see that a garden is beautiful without having to believe that there are fairies at the bottom of it too?" - Douglas Adams

bangstrom
Senior Member
Posts: 108
Joined: Sun Jun 14, 2009 6:08 am

I agree that iron deficiency is most likely the problem. A quick fix would be to spray the tree with iron chelate and see if it greens up within a few days. Iron deficiency is usually caused by a soil pH that is too high rather than a lack of iron in the soil so adding iron alone will not solve the problem. Iron deficiencies can be treated with a soil acidifier for a long term solution and acidifiers usually contain an iron supplement just in case.

buzzcut
Full Member
Posts: 42
Joined: Sat May 28, 2011 3:15 pm
Location: ne/sd

just a little background---about 3 summers ago, we were hit with straightline winds that toppled a huge number of trees in this small rural community (not to mention some other damage). it was unbelievable how it "opened" this small community---could see things like never before. anyway, a prominent lady passed away, and the family left 250 autumn blaze maples to distribute (no charge) to any families that may wish to plant a tree or trees.

so, anyway, while going for my walk, i noticed that there are many trees doing the same thing that one of mine is---some, much, much worse.

i was just wondering, since our fall is not far away (we have started to enter what i call the "sweatshirt morning and t-shirt afternoon phase), would it be best to wait till spring of next year before trying a remedy?

btw, appreciate all your comments!

bangstrom
Senior Member
Posts: 108
Joined: Sun Jun 14, 2009 6:08 am

It would be beneficial now to add an acidifier to the soil (if that is the problem). The only thing to avoid is adding nitrogen before the tree goes dormant. You don't want to stimulate new growth that will be less winter hardy. Established trees can benefit from added nutrients or soil amendments in the late fall because the roots continue growing during the winter months.

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