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Richee
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Location: Florida

Tree Wound.

I grew a tree from seed a few years ago. I think it's called an Elephant Ear tree, because the seed pods are like Elephant ears and rattle when shaken.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Enterolobium_cyclocarpum

But in the last 5 months or so, where it split into a fork, a wound appeared, and is still there after all this time. I am kind of worried that it might eventually become infected and make the tree ill.

Any idea if I need to do something for it?

[img]https://i17.photobucket.com/albums/b89/dailynightly/tree01.png[/img]

[img]https://i17.photobucket.com/albums/b89/dailynightly/tree02.png[/img]

[img]https://i17.photobucket.com/albums/b89/dailynightly/tree03.png[/img]

[img]https://i17.photobucket.com/albums/b89/dailynightly/tree04.png[/img]

Please let me know, I don't want it to die.

bullthistle
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I never heard the term elephant ears but it looks like a mimosa which are generally weed trees becuase they sprout up everywhere. Weed trees are trees that grow fast and thus have a tendency to have weak wood and are easily suseptible to damage. You may or may not losse the tree but I'd keep it out of the wind.

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Richee
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Joined: Fri Jul 30, 2010 7:42 pm
Location: Florida

It's not a Mimosa tree, or at least I don't think it is. I know what you are talking about, and agree the leaves look the same... but the tree's trunk can grow over 12ft wide, and the roots can span over a mile long.

And the seed pods don't look like a Mimosa, they look like this:

[img]https://i17.photobucket.com/albums/b89/dailynightly/tree05.png[/img]

I had to break those pods open, which was very difficult, to get the seeds out (also pictured).

After having the seed in a pot for 3 weeks and no sign of poping up, I dug the seed up to find it still untouched.

I figured it had a tough skin that needed to be broken down, which probably happens with exposure to the elements in the wild. So I decided to scrape the seed on the concrete a little.. no signs of wear.

So I scraped it again for 2 minutes.. the seed still looked polished with no scratch of any kind.

So I tried for about 10 to 15 minutes, and I broke through the tough skin of the seed, then decided to do the same on the other side of the seed. Once that was complete, I planted it in a planter again.. and after 3 days, it was sprouting.

We had strong winds the day I took the picture, along with tornado warnings... which is why the appearance of wind was in the photo. I did move it closer to the house and out of the wind, but wanted to get some pictures of it first.

I also bring it in when we have freeze warnings. The thing about living in Florida is we don't have too many days of freezing temperatures.

cynthia_h
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Could it be a kind of locust tree? I'm not good on trees, but something way back there in my brain is saying "locust bean tree."

Cynthia H.
Sunset Zone 17, USDA Zone 9

DoubleDogFarm
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Come on guys.

He's asking about the wound not the ID of the tree.

Enterolobium cyclocarpum - Monkey Ear
Monkey Ear, Ear Pod Tree, Elephant Ear Tree. Large feathery shade tree, fast growing. The legume pod is curled up and looks like an ear. The pods of this tree are used extensively as decoration and for crafts.

https://toptropicals.com/cgi-bin/garden_catalog/cat.cgi?uid=enterolobium_cyclocarpum
But in the last 5 months or so, where it split into a fork, a wound appeared, and is still there after all this time. I am kind of worried that it might eventually become infected and make the tree ill.

Any idea if I need to do something for it?
For now I would just keep an eye on it. Never use wound dressing, tar, or paint, etc.

Eric

cynthia_h
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Right you are, DDF. :oops: I overlooked the link and was mesmerized by the leaves and branches....

I read the entire Wiki article; fascinating tree. But there was nothing about diseases or insects or anything else that might explain the wound on the OP's tree.

Cynthia

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Richee
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Joined: Fri Jul 30, 2010 7:42 pm
Location: Florida

Thanks everybody!

I will keep an eye on it, but if I begin to see a problem, will it be too late?

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!potatoes!
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at the worst, you should be able to cut it off just below the wound, if it continues to worsen - i do see another branch there that could take over as leader, right?

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Richee
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Joined: Fri Jul 30, 2010 7:42 pm
Location: Florida

I just wanted to update you on the tree.

I did not cut it below the wound, but I did clean the sap out of it several times, washed it with clean water, and towel dried it often.

When I noticed the sap quit appearing, I left it alone.

The wound has since healed over very well, and the tree took on a growing spurt. In the picture I posted, the tree was about 3ft high.

I am 6ft and the tree now reaches over my head.

I'll try to get some new pictures of the tree, and it's healed wound.

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Richee
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Joined: Fri Jul 30, 2010 7:42 pm
Location: Florida

Before and After pics.



Tree wound in Janurary:
[img]https://i17.photobucket.com/albums/b89/dailynightly/tree04.png[/img]


Tree wound July.
[img]https://i17.photobucket.com/albums/b89/dailynightly/TreeWound0001.png[/img]




Tree height in Janurary.
[img]https://i17.photobucket.com/albums/b89/dailynightly/tree01.png[/img]


Tree height in July.
[img]https://i17.photobucket.com/albums/b89/dailynightly/TreeWound0002.png[/img]

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