WatchMeShove
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Joined: Tue Jan 26, 2010 1:56 am
Location: Marin County, CA

fremontodendron help

my Fremontodendron "San Gabriel" just began to flower but a lot of leaves have started to turn yellow and fall off. I think that they are evergreens but am not sure because I am a new owner of one. Is it normal for some evergreens to lose leaves at the beginning of spring? They tree didn't act like this at all throughout the winter until very recently. any help would be much appreciated. -Paul

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Kisal
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I don't know for sure, but I think probably not. The variety is a cross of a Fremontodendron native to Mexico and one from California. They require a dry, gritty, pebbly soil that drains extremely rapidly, and they dislike water water. According to what I've read, they develop root rot extremely easily.

Please keep in mind, though, that I've never seen a Freemontodendron in person, and this information is just what I've gleaned from books and online.
"Isn't it enough to see that a garden is beautiful without having to believe that there are fairies at the bottom of it too?" - Douglas Adams

WatchMeShove
Senior Member
Posts: 122
Joined: Tue Jan 26, 2010 1:56 am
Location: Marin County, CA

tree

The yellow leaves are only about 10-20% of the whole tree and the rest of the leaves look completely healthy and still dark green. It seems like if there was root rot then the whole tree would be starting to fade. It possibly could be from all the rain this winter. I just hope that the tree isn't dying, and since all the leaves turned yellow I haven't seen any other negative growth.

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Kisal
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Location: Oregon

Root rot doesn't affect the entire root ball all at once, striking suddenly and instantly killing the entire plant.

Still, I'm not going to insist that I'm out-and-out positive that that's the problem. It's just a possibility that seemed likely in view of the recent weather in your area.
"Isn't it enough to see that a garden is beautiful without having to believe that there are fairies at the bottom of it too?" - Douglas Adams

WatchMeShove
Senior Member
Posts: 122
Joined: Tue Jan 26, 2010 1:56 am
Location: Marin County, CA

tree

It probably has acted that way because of the over-watering, I looked some info about them and it says that after the winter they do not need to be watered at all. If it is root rot, does that mean that the plant is doomed, or if I don't water it may it come back and survive?

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