EB

Elder Tree Identification ?? Questions.

There is a tree in our neighborhod that I have been attempting to identify, i believe it is an Elder. I have pictures of it that can be reached via the following link:

[url]https://pg.photos.yahoo.com/ph/peppe25/album?.dir=f1dc&.src=ph&store=&prodid=&.done=http%3a//pg.photos.yahoo.com/ph/peppe25/my_photos[/url]

I would appricieate it if some could confirm my indentification.

Also, can I create a new plant from a start or using the seeds it generates?

The owner is considering removing it. I would like to save it and was wondering if it can be moved with all of the growth intact? I've read a previous thread on the techniques to move an Elder but in that case they were pruneing the entire tree back and letting it regrow.

Thanks for any help

The Helpful Gardener
Mod
Posts: 7493
Joined: Tue Feb 10, 2004 2:17 am
Location: Colchester, CT

Having trouble getting to your photo; perhaps you could e-mail it to me as an attachment?

Scott

Guest

My appologies. I coppied the wrong link from my browser. Try this,

[url]https://pg.photos.yahoo.com/ph/peppe25/album?.dir=/f1dc&.src=ph&.tok=ph36fyBBYlg3.Fzf[/url]

The Helpful Gardener
Mod
Posts: 7493
Joined: Tue Feb 10, 2004 2:17 am
Location: Colchester, CT

Although this is a much bigger (and more arboreal) specimen than I am used to seeing, I do think this is our native elder, Sambucus canandensis.

I do think you could move it, but the cut back method would be preferable as it stops the transpiration of the tree. The other possibility is to wait for the leaves to drop and dig it then; I think you may get some branch mortality that way (digging opposite sides of the tree the first year and then the other two sides next fall would be the best), but you could preserve the basic body of the tree. Needless to say either of these methods require using machinery and will entail some expense; the seed method will take you decades to get it back to this size, but is an easy and inexpensive route, and a good back-up to the other two ideas at any case.

This is probably the nicest specimen I have ever seen of this plant; is there no hope for keeping it in place? I understand that the homeowners are probably tired of the droppings (VERY purple and staining; their cars are probably the main reason they want to eliminate this tree), but the birds must MOB this tree in it's current state. A shame to eliminate such a good native wildlife plant...

Scott

Guest

Thanks for the info.

I would deffinately prefer that the tree stay where it is as opposed to risking a move and I am encouraging the owners to let it stay. The only reason I would even think about transplanting it is if it meant saving it from certain destruction.

If it comes down to it, I willprobably recruit the aid of a proffesional arborist to give it every chance to survive. I know that I could transplant it myself using the cutback method, but I hate to loose such a beutiful specimin.

The Helpful Gardener
Mod
Posts: 7493
Joined: Tue Feb 10, 2004 2:17 am
Location: Colchester, CT

It's clear to see why that is. Good luck with it...

Scott

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