smmsanders
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I need an ID for this shrub and pruning advice, please...

I recently moved into an apartment with a small backyard garden (about 400 sf) It has a climbing rose bush (I think) that is getting crowded out by another shrub. Before I prune the neighboring shrub, I'd like to know what type of shrub it is and how I should prune it. https://www.flickr.com/photos/90133212@N00/3652414946/

https://www.flickr.com/photos/90133212@N00/3654153590/in/set-72157620281673914/

https://www.flickr.com/photos/90133212@N00/3653359803/in/set-72157620281673914/
Last edited by smmsanders on Tue Jun 23, 2009 2:19 pm, edited 1 time in total.

bullthistle
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It is deciduous and although I've been away from plants for a while it looks to be a rose of sharon and if I am wrong others will let me know. You have some faily thick leaders and some suckers, smaller leaders so in the fall I would cut back the suckers to where they are branching out and cut back the main leaders by 1/4 to 1/3. Suckers will continually grow so every fall/winter prune them back. It seems the climbing rose is getting leggy so either selectively prune or cut it back to six inches above the soil. Never did like roses since my mother always had me prune hers and I was stuck many a time, but their blooms brighten an area.

smmsanders
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Thanks for the ID,

The leaves look exactly like Rose of Sharon.

Re Rose bush, I read that rose bushes should only be pruned in early spring. Since I moved in June, I didn't think I could prune in late spring. I'm still too much of a novice to know what rules you can and can't break.

cynthia_h
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For right now re. the rose, just dead-head it (cut back to a 5-leaf branchlet as each rose fades from bloom) and clip back any dead twigs or super spindly-looking branches. Stuff that doesn't look like it can stand up on its own = spindly, in my book. :wink:

Later on (late fall/early winter) it will need to be prepared for winter "sleep." But for now, just give it extra nutrition: I like liquid kelp + my own compost, but you might want to go for an organic rose food with or without liquid kelp, which is a terrific slow-release source of minerals.

My gardener girlfriend also has a spiral staircase with a tight turn and small footprint, probably the same version as yours. Although hers is indoors, right inside a 2-story glass window, she has some plants in containers on the inside edge of almost every stair. She also has a few hanging containers but has secured their hangers to the bannister with extra supports of many kinds.

I like your window garden and the balcony containers! :D

Cynthia H.
Sunset Zone 17, USDA Zone 9

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rainbowgardener
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rose of sharon

The rose of sharon is an aggressive spreader which will get huge and will keep putting up new shoots to turn into a big colony. It will also tend to pop up shoots other spots in your yard. It can handle being cut back a lot and you will have to stay vigilant about pop ups to keep it from taking over your yard.

I'm not really a rose person but yours does look tall and spindly. I think it's probably too shaded behind that fence, so it's been stretching to get to the light. Once it's going dormant, or early in spring, you might think about not only cutting it back (that would be fall), but transplanting it to a sunnier location (away from the rose of sharon!).

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Wahrheit
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Re: I need an ID for this shrub and pruning advice, please..

smmsanders wrote:I recently moved into an apartment with a small backyard garden (about 400 sf) It has a climbing rose bush (I think) that is getting crowded out by another shrub. Before I prune the neighboring shrub, I'd like to know what type of shrub it is and how I should prune it.







Heavy pruning of a rose bush should really be done only in late winter/early spring. You can still prune as needed all summer, but as a general rule, wouldn't cut much more than about 6 to12 inches.

Don't prune too heavy in the fall/early winter because it may encourage new and tender growth, that can be easily damaged by the cold winter. When you prune early spring, you encourage the rose bush to 'wake up' and start growing!
Pruning does encourage growth.


I just cut back my Madame Alfred Carriere ( climber) by about 3 feet!
But it's a fairly large climber, and there's a long growing season left to go.


Based on the picture, your rose looks like it *could be* Don Juan, but it's very hard to tell, seeing that it's not a closeup view.


Wahrheit

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