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dirtygirl22
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Joined: Mon Apr 20, 2009 11:43 pm
Location: Westchester County, NY

Help with Arborvite!

i live in Lower Hudson Valley NY and have enjoyed the Arborvite that border our property since we moved here 5 yrs ago. They are very green and narrow and tall 10 feet or so, Emerald Green variety i believe. Just this past few months I've noticed they are thinning from the bottom up. turning brown and thinning as if dying. All in a uniform way. Up till this point they have been so healthy and beautiful. We have never done anything but let them grow since there were never any problems. I should mention that many homes in the area have the same problem. Actually more advanced so that the bottoms are dead and only tops of the trees are green. It seems so strange does anyone know what is happening and how to stop it!?
:(

bullthistle
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Location: North Carolina

You can't stop it. It is one the many problems with arborvitae that some suffer. It is the nature of the plant and its envirionment. Compared to other evergreens arborvitae seem to be the unhealthiest of the bunch but it also suffers from pollution and other maladies. Chain saw is the quickest way to solve your problem. Sorry. Nothing lasts forever.

The Helpful Gardener
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Easy BT. Before we break out chainsaws...

This is the normal evolution of most trees, especially evergreens. The bottom branches get more and more shade and get sparse or pass on. All part of Life's rich pageant... you can see through the hedge at Mom's house, which you couldn't when I lived there (thirty five years ago). Things get older and change; I know I did...so I will agree with BT on one thing, you can't stop it... deer pruning on these plants is common and I suspect that is the issue at a few neighbors houses and maybe yours too; notice a thinner waist as they get near the ground?

Think about plants for in front of them or as BT suggested, think about the replacements, but it sounds most like low light issues and natural degeneration thereof...

HG
Scott Reil

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dirtygirl22
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Joined: Mon Apr 20, 2009 11:43 pm
Location: Westchester County, NY

Thanks for replies. Well it doesn't sound promising :( shame. We can probably plant a row of hostas in front of them these should grow and hide the bottoms I'm thinking. if anyone has and other suggestions, bring 'em on!
thanks,
- Bonnie

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