photographybyalisha
Newly Registered
Posts: 7
Joined: Thu Apr 02, 2009 11:25 am
Location: Kentucky

Burning bush or firepower nandina?

and why?

pd
Senior Member
Posts: 184
Joined: Sat Jun 07, 2008 11:17 pm

Be wary of common names (vernacular) many different plants have the same local name.
My experience tells me that the true and original 'burning bush' is Dictamnus alba' a perennial that when mature gives off a volatile oil. On a warm, calm summer evening the evaporation of this oil hangs around the plant and can easily be ignited.

bullthistle
Greener Thumb
Posts: 1152
Joined: Sun Feb 24, 2008 3:26 pm
Location: North Carolina

You folks in the U.K. have strange plants. I prefer evergreen over deciduous so I vote of Nandina. But the plants are opposites so why would you be chosing between the two? One is dwarf the other standard.

pd
Senior Member
Posts: 184
Joined: Sat Jun 07, 2008 11:17 pm

It appears I did not understand your question. My answer was regarding plant nomenclature. Perhaps you could explain more fully what help you are seeking.

valleytreeman
Senior Member
Posts: 101
Joined: Tue Jan 27, 2009 12:31 pm
Location: Shenandoah Valley

One or the other

As Bullthistle said, 'Firepower' is a dwarf Nandina, with very colorful foliage that intensifies as cold weather sets in. It is 'evergreen' or 'everred'. It rarely exceeds 2 or 3 feet in height and spread, and I have never seen one bear fruit.

The typical burning bush is a euonymus, can get right large if you let it, has a blze of red in the fall and as mentioned before, drops its leaves. In some quarters it is considered invasive.

I think your choice is greatly dependent upon you application and the effect you want to exhibit.
hey its me!

Treeman

valleytreeman
Senior Member
Posts: 101
Joined: Tue Jan 27, 2009 12:31 pm
Location: Shenandoah Valley

Interesting

pd, that is an interesting plant.... i shall have to investigate that further. Can you imagine the fun you can have with smokers who visit your garden with a plant like that.
hey its me!

Treeman

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