Toms92gp
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Location: Louisburg, NC zone 7b

Fragrant Shurbs and Small trees.

I'm look for some input on fragrant shrubs and small trees. I know Viburnums, Lilacs, Alot of roses, some plum trees, Gardenias and Sweet Betsy are fragrant. I would like to know about other Fragrant shrubs and small trees people have that will survive in zones 7b or 8a. I'm looking to plant some close to windows in my house that I open normally. Thanks for the input

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bonsaiboy
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I would recommend some type of mimosa. The smell can be detected about 100 ft away from the tree. Im not sure wich variety, though. Maybe someone else can help you out there...

TheLorax
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Mimosa trees are highly invasive particularly where this person gardens. Not a good recommendation. The scientific name of the tree is Albizia julibrissin if anyone wants to google for information on this species.

Here's a little blurb about Mimosa-
https://www.nps.gov/plants/ALIEN/fact/alju1.htm

Some suggestions for a fragrant tree or shrub could be made if a little bit more information about where it was going to be planted was added. Sun? Shade? Wet? Dry? That kind of information would be really a big help.

Also too, not all viburnums are fragrant and some lilacs can actually sucker worse than that elm you're dealing with.

cynthia_h
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I'm not sure where Louisburg is in North Carolina, but Sunset's National Garden Book indicates that several varieties of lavender will grow in coastal and central NC.

Cynthia H.
USDA Zone 9, Sunset Zone 17

planter
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Location: South Shore MA/ Z6?

Don't forget the Daphne's. Great little shrub here in Z6. Not a shrub but the sweet autumm paniculata is really fragrant right about now.

Clethra are fair for fragrance but it's actually a battle (minor skirmish) to keep them in the woods.

I doubt they are hardy in your neck of the woods but I love my Brugmansia/Angel Trumpets. Here in Z6 I have to haul them into the basement but it's worth it for the evening scent.

I spent weeks this spring pulling Burning bush,Barberries,and scotch broom and now I find out my Mimosa is invasive to. To bad as it flowers at such a great time of the season

Privet is certainly fragrant if you like the smell of dog urine. :cry:
Got anything good that's Z6 hardy?

TheLorax
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Clethra is a nice suggestion. I do find mine have fragrance and they're very attractive when in bloom.

Toms92gp
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Location: Louisburg, NC zone 7b

TheLorax wrote:Mimosa trees are highly invasive particularly where this person gardens. Not a good recommendation. The scientific name of the tree is Albizia julibrissin if anyone wants to google for information on this species.

Here's a little blurb about Mimosa-
https://www.nps.gov/plants/ALIEN/fact/alju1.htm

Some suggestions for a fragrant tree or shrub could be made if a little bit more information about where it was going to be planted was added. Sun? Shade? Wet? Dry? That kind of information would be really a big help.

Also too, not all viburnums are fragrant and some lilacs can actually sucker worse than that elm you're dealing with.
Most of my yard is pretty well drained but the soil stays moist unless it hasn't rained in over a week, and its slightly acidic. Where I'm planning on planting in one area it is sunny most of the day, the other gets sun until around 1-2pm and then its in the shade. Mimosa trees spread like wildfire down here, you plant one and in 5 years you have a mimosa forest. Louisburg is about 45 miles NE of Raleigh, Nc in the Ne Peidmont, Lavender will grow around here, I've been thinking about planting some.

Solveig
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I have no clue about your zones, but mock oranges, Philadelphus, are very fragrant too.

planter
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Location: South Shore MA/ Z6?

I've had Mock Orange that did not have any fragrance at all but I've smelled others that were heavenly.

Don't forget Poncirus Trifliotta (sp) flying dragon. It's one seriously hardy orange that works for me in Z6. Some years it has great fragrance and some years it doesn't.. If you put in a Flying Dragon BEWARE the thorns as they are wicked!!!! Never seen a plant with such large and dangerous 4 inch thorns :twisted:
Got anything good that's Z6 hardy?

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applestar
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I think lavender needs alkaline, well drained/dry'ish soil....

How about native azaleas?
Also, carolina allspice (sweet shrub, calycanthus floridus)
Carolina jasmine (that's a vine), hmm... what else?
Swamp rose
Myrica gale (bog myrtle)
Magnolia virginiana (sweet bay magnolia)

I just planted a little Flying Dragon! I'm borderline zone6/7 so I'm hoping it'll do OK. :D

TheLorax
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All that applestar mentioned are great suggestions.
The Rhododendron calendulaceum has some nice height to it while R. arborescens is considerably smaller.

Here's a few more you might like to consider:
-Lindera benzoin (Spicebush) very distinct fragrance to this that should be bottled and sold as perfume or something
-Symphoricarpos orbiculatus (?)
-Callicarpa americana (Beautyberry) this particular Callicarpa is fragrant
-Photinia melanocarpa (Black Chokecherry)
-Leucothoe fontanesiana (Doghobble) Very attractive plant
-Diervilla sessilifolia (Southern Bush Honeysuckle)

Sassafras albidum (Sassafras) is a small tree as far as actual trees go that would be in the league of highly fragrant but it's going to mature at over 30' possibly even a little bit taller.
Malus angustifolia (Southern Crabapple) Nice fragrance and mature height won't go beyond 30'.

You didn't ask for any vines so sort of just tossing this out for you to look up but it smells very nice and has beautiful yellow blooms- Gelsemium sempervirens (Yellow Jessamine)

Toms92gp
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Location: Louisburg, NC zone 7b

applestar wrote:I think lavender needs alkaline, well drained/dry'ish soil....

How about native azaleas?
Also, carolina allspice (sweet shrub, calycanthus floridus)
Carolina jasmine (that's a vine), hmm... what else?
Swamp rose
Myrica gale (bog myrtle)
Magnolia virginiana (sweet bay magnolia)

I just planted a little Flying Dragon! I'm borderline zone6/7 so I'm hoping it'll do OK. :D
I have Azaleas, and some rhododendrons planted around the house, I know the azaleas I have don't have much scent. I forgot about sweet bay that does have a wonderful scent. Carolina Allspice is hit or miss, I've smelt some very fragrant and then some, like the ones my parents have, have almost no scent. I could put a vine climbing on the latice around my front porch as long as it can tolerate afternoon shade.

cynthia_h
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If you'd like something to climb up pillars, maybe star jasmine (Trachelospermum, aka Rhynchospermum) could be added to your list of possibilities.

Sunset lists it as successful in your area (Sunset Zone 31/32) and states that the plant may need "some shade in hot areas." I have some out by the street with no cover at all, but it grows out from under a jade plant and juniper intermixed. It gets full morning/midday sun, but then falls into shade as the sun moves further west.

It is incredibly aromatic. You can smell the flowers from many feet away if the breeze is toward you.

Cynthia

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applestar
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Native azaleas and rhodos are NOT the popular foundation plants you see in garden centers everywhere. The flowers are more loosely clustered and the the branches are longer, slender and arching, and they often flower very early, sometimes before they leaf out. They usually have honey sweet fragrance that intensify in the evening since the trumpet shaped flowers attract moths. In the spring, my kids and I went around smelling every azalea they had at a large garden center, and we always ended up going back to the native azaleas even though some of the Asian azaleas had showier flowers that attracted us. :wink: (i.e. Those were disappointingly scent-less).

The lankier branches are actually a bonus -- I ground layered them rather than cutting them off after flowering like the guy at the garden center suggested. :mrgreen:

Toms92gp
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Location: Louisburg, NC zone 7b

I ordered a few Mock Oranges. I may also go in the spring to some garden centers and go sniffing for some in Bloom. Its just so much more difficult to keep stuff planted in mid to late spring when its in bloom alive down here because of the heat. Fall is a much better time for planting trees and shrubs down here, unfortunatly not to many things are in bloom in the Fall to smell them.

zaneyzelda
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I love my mimosa tree

I love my mimosa tree and so do the many people who walk by my house to get to the park. It smells oh so lovely in the warm summer, now it is a messy tree to be sure, but like in life, most things greatly enjoyable come with a not so good side too. One would never want to plant it near a swimming pool etc because it is always dropping something, but it is a beautiful tree and I love mine. yes, it drops seeds that jump up and grow, but I just pull them like weeds. I guess if you don't want to pull weeds, than you wouldn't like it ;)
Jesus is Lord

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