opabinia51
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I haven't heard of those heirlooms before, i'll keep my eye out for them.
Feed the soil, not the plants.

damethod
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I've only tried about 10 varieties...but, if I had to pick one it would be Plum tomatoes simply because they are the most versitile of the grocery store varieties. You can use them in salads and sandwiches as you could all of the other grocery types, but it is generally the preferred choice for making tomato sauce. I base that on the numerous cooking shows I have watched and the recipes I've printed for tomato sauce.

Of course, with hundreds of different types of tomatoes...it's very hard to pick just one.

damethod
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oh and opa...if it's not too much to ask...I would looove to try a sundried tomato bread recipe. :D

I would also need tips on drying the tomato though.. :?

TheLorax
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Sat Trentt, where did you purchase your Say Trentt, where did you purchase your orange strawberry tomatoes please? Your description of them makes me want them! Thanks for mentioning that variety.

wurzelgummidge
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one of my favourite tomatoes is money makers which you can grow in a greenhouse and out in the garden and in pots.
and for flavour i find cherry tomatoes excelant
ps i wish i could find a spell checker that spelt better than me :D
i use google english british :cry:
he who knows all does not exist

TheLorax
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Any English is fine. I doubt seriously if anyone here truly cares about misspellings. Scientific names can always be cut and pasted into documents so that's easy enough. There are spell checkers out there for free that we can use but I think if we download them we get toolbars and other garbage bundled into our freebie. Not worth it to me to download free programs. I think I'll just type away and if I make a mistake, somebody else can correct me if they even want to bother.

I've had cherry tomatoes before and like them but I've never had a Money Maker. I'll have to go check into that one.

Linny
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Trentt,

I read about heirloom tomatoes in a "MotherEarth News" Magazine and decided to give them a shot. I decided on a variety called Brandywine. All I know about them is they take a long time to mature, and they are supposed to taste great! I have three growing in an earth box and have at last count, about twenty tomatoes. It should be another couple of months or so before the first mature tomato. My question is, the plants are very bushy and tall, and the leaf's are huge. I was wondering if I should cut off any of the non-bearing stems, or otherwise prune them in anyway. I have them staked up, and can keep staking them as they grow taller and fuller. I pinched off the growth between the stalk and stem, but there still seems to be so much foliage there! Should I remove anything or just leave them alone?

I sure would appreciate any advice from you or anyone else that has any for me :D

eshenry
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MMMMM Brandywine, Cherokee black, golden pear........ Burpee hybrids.....they are all good. I prefer the more acid ones.

petalfuzz
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TheLorax wrote:Sat Trentt, where did you purchase your Say Trentt, where did you purchase your orange strawberry tomatoes please? Your description of them makes me want them! Thanks for mentioning that variety.
I don't know where Trent bought his seeds, but this site sells them. If the link doesn't work, search for strawberry in the description field.

[url]https://www.tomatogrowers.com/orange.htm[/url] Scroll about halfway down to find the right one. They also have orange banana. It's a neat site.

TheLorax
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I found one here-
https://store.tomatofest.com/German_Red_Strawberry_p/tf-0189.htm

Your Orange Strawberry tomato looks better than the one I found. I like the oddball shaped tomatoes as well as the ones that come in funky colors.

Check out this Green Zebra tomato-
https://www.reimerseeds.com/images/products/Tomato/Green_Zebra_Tomato_Seeds.jpg

Now check out Mr. Stripey-
https://www.flickr.com/photos/farlane/1350823014/

This Yellow Pear is pretty wild looking-
https://www.flickr.com/photos/ulteriorepicure/202893424/

Trentt
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I got the Orange Strawberry seeds from a seed catalog called Totally Tomatoes, located here in Wisconsin. They have countless varieties and I went a bit nuts so didn't buy new seeds of any kind of tomatoes this year. When the catalog came I tossed it into the recycling bin.

I've read reviews of this catalog's products on other forums that were negative, and sometimes not all the seeds sprouted (a complaint in some of these unfavorable reviews). But I keep all my leftover seeds in the fridge and use them year after year until they are gone. While I had no Orange Strawberries the first year I planted them, last year (year #2) I had a few germinate and ended up with 3 plants in the garden, and they produced prolifically.

I do not prune off "excess" foliage from my tomatoes, though I'm sure this is a point of debate among tomato growers. I think the leaves protect the fruit from sun scald. I figure the tomatoes know how to grow themselves so I stake and cage them, feed them and water them, then feast.

Linny
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Trentt wrote:I do not prune off "excess" foliage from my tomatoes, though I'm sure this is a point of debate among tomato growers. I think the leaves protect the fruit from sun scald. I figure the tomatoes know how to grow themselves so I stake and cage them, feed them and water them, then feast.
I have not seen any of the "points of debate" from any other tomato grower though I'm sure they are out there. I have never grown the heirloom tomatoes that take so long to mature, and the protection from sun scald makes sense. I just needed some advice from someone who has grown heirloom tomatoes. I tend to agree with you that the tomatoes know what they are doing. I think plants are like animals. They know what to do. You make sure they have food, water, and sunshine, and instinctively they know how to raise their "off-spring".

I am so looking forward to the feast part!

TheLorax
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I found your source-
https://www.totallytomato.com/

Looks like a great site so many thanks for mentioning it.

I didn't quite know what to think about pruning or pinching or what ever we're supposed to be doing to tomato plants after they're planted and staked so I left mine alone. Figured it best to resist the urge to mess with them until I saw what they could produce without being fiddled with.

mistygardener
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OMG that sounds like something I would have for dessert, too! Sorry it took me so long to reply, just been very busy gardening! :) I didn't get around to any veggies this year as all the other plants have kept me so busy.

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hendi_alex
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I like slicers but for pure great tomato flavor it is my opinion that many of the mid size salad tomatoes excel. My favorite used to be '4th of July'. Last year I tried several new varieties. My wife and I did a taste test and 'sweet cluster' won out over '4th of July'. Both plants are very productive and tomatoes are excellent. Very moist, great texture, full flavor and acid bite. The 'Sweet cluster' had just a hint of sweetness to round out that acid full flavored tomato. Sweet cluster tends to rival 'Juliet' for productivity, and IMO has a better flavor as that favorite as well. 'Juliet' is an oval salad tomato, a good bit smaller on average than 'sweet cluster'. Has a little less pronounced acidity, but great texture and flavor. Is excellent for drying as well as fresh eating. Is extremely disease resistant and a really productive workhorse. There is room for both of these tomatoes in my garden. For slicers, there are just too many that taste great for me to narrow it down. I love parks whopper, better boy, brandywine, celebrity, and some of the newer beefsteak varieties. I find it hard to be disappointed with these indeterminate large slicers. I don't care for varieties that are irregularly shaped and don't care for those with a big woody core. Aside from that, have not had a variety that disappointed me.
Eclectic gardening style, drawing from 45 years of interest and experience. Mostly plant in raised beds and containers primarily using intensive gardening techniques.
Alex

mistygardener
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OK, now I want a tomato and miracle whip sandwich! LOL

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hendi_alex
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Yuk! Miracle whip? Gotta be Dukes, mayonaise of the south. Can't be any of the Helman's stuff either, just a dandy French want a be. This has to be one of the most good natured debates among friends in the south - Dukes vs. Helman's. Aren't many down here that would put the miracle whip on a tomato sandwich though. Maybe in some potato salad or other salad, but not spread on a sandwich.
Last edited by hendi_alex on Thu Jul 17, 2008 3:04 am, edited 1 time in total.
Eclectic gardening style, drawing from 45 years of interest and experience. Mostly plant in raised beds and containers primarily using intensive gardening techniques.
Alex

mistygardener
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LOL Miracle Whip was all I ever used, but I have switched to Mayo here recently. I don't have a clue what kind you are talking about, though I'd prob give it a try if I could find it! :) BTW, I am a Southern Girl, just stuck in the North! LOLOL :lol:

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hendi_alex
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Probably one of those things that simply boils down to 'what mamma used'. One thing for sure, there ain't no substitute for a good ole juicy tomato sandwich. Only recently did I hear what I guess is a Georgia term. They call a juicy tomato sandwich a "sink sandwich." Guess it is because the sandwich is so juicy and drips so much, it was often eaten over the sink, or so the saying goes.
Eclectic gardening style, drawing from 45 years of interest and experience. Mostly plant in raised beds and containers primarily using intensive gardening techniques.
Alex

mistygardener
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A sink sandwich, that is a new one for me! LOL A mater like that I'd just have to put it on a plate with some salt and eat it allllllllllllllll gone! LOL Some might think it really strange, but I love maters with my mashed taters! :oops:

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JennyC
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[quote="hendi_alex"]Yuk! Miracle whip? Gotta be Dukes, mayonaise of the south. [quote]

Whose south? Bama mayo, I say.

Seriously, Dukes may be a regional thing, as Bama is; I'd never heard of it. I grew up, predictably enough, in Alabama.

I do agree wholeheartedly on the Miracle Whip issue. Not food.
Jenny C

mistygardener
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Miracle Whip not food! LOL

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hendi_alex
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BAMA
BAMA Mayonnaise has been a favorite in the heart of the south for over 50 years. Its formula was developed specifically for consumers wanting a distinctly southern mayonnaise. BAMA Mayonnaise combines premium ingredients to achieve our southern taste and texture. An exotic blend of spices is added to soybean oil of the highest quality and pasteurized egg yolks, then blended to a smooth consistency and texture. Finally, a touch of lemon is added to achieve the ultimate in southern mayonnaise.

The description sounds a lot like Dukes with that kick of lemon.

Did a quick search and guess what. C.F. Sauer, like the mustard, produces both Dukes and Bama. Bet they market each as a separate regional product.

https://www.cfsauer.com/products.asp
Eclectic gardening style, drawing from 45 years of interest and experience. Mostly plant in raised beds and containers primarily using intensive gardening techniques.
Alex

cheshirekat
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I don't like mayonnaise at all. I got food poisoning as a kid after something bad at a picnic and have totally disliked mayonnaise since. A doctor once told me that food poisoning from foods with mayonnaise occur more frequently than any other food.

My favorite sliced tomato sandwiches have bacon in them.
"Love all God's creatures, the animals, the plants. Love everything to perceive the divine mystery in all." -Fyodor Dostoyevsky

mistygardener
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That is kinda like me with Krispie Cream donuts! Me and two of my kids got deathly ill after eating the filled ones and now I won't touch them at all!

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