Lockie
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Tomato sunburn

My tomato seedling seems to be turning yellow starting edge first. It was planted indoors at first on a windowsill,and I moved it outside a few days ago. I gave it full sunlight because my bio teacher said tomato love sunlight. But after the first day the leaves gets yellow. Now one of the original seed leaves are also yellow,and I suspect it's getting sun burnt after doing some research,but moving it into the shades doesnt seem to be helping. Am I right about the sun burnt part?What can I do now?

EDIT:Just a quick overview,the seedling germinated about 15 days ago,and I had no experience whatsoever with planting just about anything. I think I'm watering it enough though. I moved it into a shade under the roof(but still outdoors)but it's not turning any better. It still gets like an hour or so of sunlight though. If more detail is needed I can take more photos of the plant. Thank you!
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PaulF
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Re: Tomato sunburn

Once burned the leaves don't unburn. It is a good idea to keep the plant out of direct sunlight for a while. A little dappled sunlight is best to keep the plant from being hurt further. The burned leaves will later die out but it won't really hurt the plant if you can keep the others from being damaged.
Paul F

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rainbowgardener
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Re: Tomato sunburn

Agree. The burned leaves won't recover, but the plant can recover and make new leaves that will be fine.

It needs to be put in protected area and then gradually "hardened off," that is exposed to sun a little bit at a time. I do that by where I put them, but many people do it by hours in the sun, gradually increasing the hours each day. I start with my seedlings in a spot where they get no direct sun, then after a day or two move them to where they get only filtered light or only a couple hours of morning sun and gradually move them to less and less protected locations.

Tomatoes do love sunshine, the more the better. If you planted a seed in the ground in a full sun location, the seedling when it sprouted would automatically be adapted to the full sun and wouldn't need hardening. Starting seeds indoors, they are tender and can't handle the sun until they get used to it.
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Lockie
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Re: Tomato sunburn

PaulF wrote:Once burned the leaves don't unburn. It is a good idea to keep the plant out of direct sunlight for a while. A little dappled sunlight is best to keep the plant from being hurt further. The burned leaves will later die out but it won't really hurt the plant if you can keep the others from being damaged.
Thank you for the suggestion!Does moving it under a roof to block direct sunlight work then?It is still growing new leaves(thankfully)so I hope it can still survive…

Lockie
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Re: Tomato sunburn

rainbowgardener wrote:Agree. The burned leaves won't recover, but the plant can recover and make new leaves that will be fine.

It needs to be put in protected area and then gradually "hardened off," that is exposed to sun a little bit at a time. I do that by where I put them, but many people do it by hours in the sun, gradually increasing the hours each day. I start with my seedlings in a spot where they get no direct sun, then after a day or two move them to where they get only filtered light or only a couple hours of morning sun and gradually move them to less and less protected locations.

Tomatoes do love sunshine, the more the better. If you planted a seed in the ground in a full sun location, the seedling when it sprouted would automatically be adapted to the full sun and wouldn't need hardening. Starting seeds indoors, they are tender and can't handle the sun until they get used to it.
Thank you so much!I had no idea it still needed hardening off. I put it under a roof and hopefully that would prevent further damage… Thanks!

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applestar
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Re: Tomato sunburn

One easy way is to put a folding lawn/lounge chair over them -- the kind with straps and gaps. Just have to watch out on windy days so they don't get blown over. Milk crates would be another idea.

Haha actually I use anything lying around when I feel like I was too hasty in planting them or when the weather forecasters lie and it turns out to NOT rain and stays clear and sunny -- especially for little seedlings
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pepperhead212
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Re: Tomato sunburn

Good suggestion, Apple! I put things on my deck, under or next to a table, where the sun hits them briefly, but then is off of them, and maybe back briefly later on, then on the other side of the house. Later, further out from the table, where the rails shade them some, and maybe one of the large plants, after the sun is on them a while. Eventually, on top of the table, but they will still be shaded by the house sooner than if in the garden, and by then, most things have gotten dark green, and are ready to go out to the garden.
Dave

Lockie
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Re: Tomato sunburn

Thanks for all the awesome advices!Should I get rid of the burnt leaves then?Some of them are still half green so I'm not sure what i should do with em. Thanks everyo ne!

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