manatex
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Joined: Fri Jul 26, 2013 8:36 pm

tomato plant is big- no tomatoes

My tomato plant is big, green, and it won't give tomatoes. We live in the desert southwest, my other tomato plants are yielding tomatoes.
I water every 2-3 days and have given them plant food.

Help...
Ralph McCullen

Dillbert
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Location: Central PA

Re: tomato plant is big- no tomatoes

>>dessert southwest
water _every day and deeply_

cease with the plant food / fertilizer.

too much food makes for lots of green, not so many fruits.....

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rainbowgardener
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Location: TN/GA 7b

Re: tomato plant is big- no tomatoes

Desert southwest in July sounds like HOT! Not weather for setting tomatoes. Here:

https://www.helpfulgardener.com/forum/vi ... 15&t=54232

is a post (currently the bottom one on the thread) I just did for someone outside of Phoenix AZ.

Tomatoes generally can't set or ripen fruit in temps over 90, especially if they are not heat adapted varieties.
Twitter account I manage for local Sierra Club: https://twitter.com/CherokeeGroupSC Facebook page I manage for them: https://www.facebook.com/groups/65310596576/ Come and find me and lots of great information, inspiration

Smallgardener
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Location: SW Kansas

Re: tomato plant is big- no tomatoes

Do know what the varieties you have? It sounds to me like it is varietal. Is that a word? (Varietal)

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rainbowgardener
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Re: tomato plant is big- no tomatoes

Here's an article about growing tomatoes in the desert

https://ag.arizona.edu/maricopa/garden/h ... tiful.html

note it suggests growing in morning sun only location, with 50% shade cloth, mulched heavily and still it says


Generally, it is said that flowers do not set fruit when temperatures are below 55°F or above 90°F. However, I have had abundant tomato production all summer long when growing smaller varieties, cherries and yellow pears, in heavily mulched soil under 50% shade cloth. Indeterminate plants that have stopped or slowed production in the hot summer temperatures will often become productive again when the weather cools in September and October, so don't give up on them when they look half-dead in August!
Twitter account I manage for local Sierra Club: https://twitter.com/CherokeeGroupSC Facebook page I manage for them: https://www.facebook.com/groups/65310596576/ Come and find me and lots of great information, inspiration



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