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applestar
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Cornell.edu and other Tomato Diagnostic links

Found this link in an old thread:

This one's by appearance of fruit, but by clicking on the plant picture, you can go to diagnostic by appearance of leaves, stems, etc.


[url=https://vegetablemdonline.ppath.cornell.edu/DiagnosticKeys/TomFrt/TomFrtKey.html]Tomato  Disease  Identification  Key By Affected Plant Part: Fruit Symptoms[/url]

Kell13
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Awesome resource. Thank you so much for this link!!
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imafan26
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Here is another great resource from TAMU

Here is another great resource. The aggie horticulture tomato solver

https://aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/vege ... em-solver/ :idea:
Happy gardening in Hawaii. Gardens are where people grow.

memory94
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Re: Cornell.edu Tomato Diagnostic link

https://aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/vege ... lt-damage/

what does it mean by ''Select salt tolerant varieties.''?

and thnks for link

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rainbowgardener
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Re: Cornell.edu Tomato Diagnostic link

It is talking about if salt damage is a problem in your situation:

Salt damage is rarely encountered in field situations except under very poor water quality situations. Salt damage may become a problem in pot [container] culture or in hydroponics. Select salt tolerant varieties.

If you are adding synthetic fertilizers, which are chemical salts, frequently, in a container growing situation, the salts can build up. Solutions to that are changing the soil in your container, at least annually, using organic fertilizers like compost etc, flushing lots of water through. And I guess it would in that situation to grow varieties of tomatoes which have been bred to be tolerant of higher level of soil salts.

But honestly when I tried to look up what would be salt tolerant varieties, all I got was information about new GMO tomatoes, which are lab created with recombinant DNA to tolerate really brackish water, salt spray from the ocean etc.

"Salt tolerance is a complex process that is not controlled by a single gene, so attempts at breeding [without GMO techniques] salt-tolerant tomatoes have been unsuccessful. " https://homeguides.sfgate.com/salt-toler ... 53782.html again that is talking about high salt tolerance like brackish water.

So, although I know what the words mean, I don't know what it means in practice to select salt tolerant varieties, since I couldn't find the existence of any. But it isn't important since 1) growing in the ground you will rarely have problems with excess salt unless you are really pouring on the Miracle Gro, in which case you could stop doing that. 2) growing in containers the problem is solved by changing the soil.
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imafan26
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Re: Cornell.edu Tomato Diagnostic link

The only other situation I can think of where salt would be an issue is if you live near the ocean. Between the salt air and salt spray only salt tolerant plants can grow there.

If you live in a desert area, there may be high salt levels in the water. Short of filtering the water or softening the water, I would not know how to fix that.

If your soil is sodic, then planting in raised beds or pots with imported soil helps.

Tomatoes are already fairly tolerant of salt, so anything you can do to reduce exposure would help.

BTW use fertilizer to kill snails instead of salt. It works and salt isn't very good for the garden.
Happy gardening in Hawaii. Gardens are where people grow.

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McKinney88
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Tomato Diseases and Disorders PDF

I found this pdf online that shows a lot of the most common tomato diseases and disorders. Just wanted to share it. If you click the link below, it should start a download of the pdf.

https://store.extension.iastate.edu/Product/pm1266-pdf

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JC's Garden
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Re: Cornell.edu Tomato Diagnostic link

Well I have one not on these list. It took a little digging (literally and figuratively) but I got my answer. Southern Blight!!!! :shock: Here is a quick quote and a link to the article.

"Southern blight is a white mold that rots the stem at or near the soil line. The plant is stunted, wilts or dies. Look for the cottony fungus growth and the light brown BB sized fruiting structures of the fungus. The fungus may be at or slightly above or below the soil line. You may not see the white fungus growth if the weather is dry, even though the plant may still be infected.
To manage the disease, bury all plant residues before planting, plant vegetables farther apart, and treat with Terraclor at planting if you have a problem with Southern blight. Do not allow mulch to touch the base of the plant. Keep mulch at least 2 inches away from the stem of the plant. Some people wrap the stem near the soil line with foil to slow this disease. The foil should extend 2 inches above and 2 inches below the soil line."

https://www.ugaurbanag.com/content/tomato-wilt

Yep, I had to dig to find it. If you want to know what signs are, picture this, cut a healthy plant off at soil level and wait 12 to 24 hours. :(

Juliuskitty
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Re: Cornell.edu Tomato Diagnostic link

Heres on more very excellent link. I think this whole thread should be stickied if it isn't already.

https://www.wvu.edu/~agexten//ipm/factsh ... y_6_09.pdf
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Franenuss
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Re: Tomato Diseases and Disorders PDF

Thank you!

imafan26
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Re: Tomato Diseases and Disorders PDF

Thank you. There are a few university websites that have very good information on tomatoes.
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imafan26
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Re: Cornell.edu and other Tomato Diagnostic links

The cornell website also has this table (scroll down to see the table) of tomato cultivars and the various resistances they have. It does not list every tomato under the sun, but it is a comprehensive list.

I need to use it when I think about trying a new tomato since nematode, fusarium, verticillium , virus and heat resistance are important considerations in whether a tomato will even survive here. The ones that are not nematode resistant need to be in pots off the ground. Fusarium and verticillum resistance is important because the high humidity favors fungal growth and I don't like to have to spray all of the time.

https://vegetablemdonline.ppath.cornell. ... Table.html
Happy gardening in Hawaii. Gardens are where people grow.

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