Tony02905
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Joined: Tue Apr 12, 2011 7:34 pm
Location: Massachusetts

Going to try a non thinning method..

Watched a video on youtube from one of the universities growing extensions, can't remember which one, but in the video the tomato seeds were started in a smal pot, about 10 to 12 seeds.

About two weeks after they had sprouted, instead of thinning them, they were tipped out of the pot, separated and all were replanted in larger pots. I recently planted some more tomato seeds this way, 27 seedlings in three pots, going to try this and see what happens.

Anyone else ever try this?
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Lunacy
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Joined: Tue Mar 30, 2010 9:16 pm
Location: Los Angeles

I tried that this year in small peat trays. I planted about five seeds in a pot and just pulled them apart after a week or so. They all did fine.

Tony02905
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Posts: 38
Joined: Tue Apr 12, 2011 7:34 pm
Location: Massachusetts

Glad to hear that! I figure it will save space in the beginning and materials such as soil mixtures, pots, peat pots etc..Keep me updated !!
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gumbo2176
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Location: New Orleans

Tomato seedlings are pretty hardy. They can stand a bit of abuse and still come out fine. I usually plant 2-3 seeds a pot and thin them for transplanting to larger pots before placing in the garden. Just about all plants survive if you don't critically damage the roots when pulling them apart.

I find lettuce, as fragile a plant as it seems is also one that doesn't mind some "not so gentle" handling.

TZ -OH6
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Location: Mid Ohio

I do it all the time

https://www.flickr.com/photos/51251503@N03/

SOB
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Location: Radnor, OH

This is my second year and I planted two seeds per cell and I found it time consuming to carefully pull them apart when I transplanted as their roots grew together. Next year I'll plant only one per cell with twice as many cells and make it much easier to pop it out of the cell and toss it in a new pot.

Now, space isn't a concern for me when they are in cells so that may be the difference...

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Alan in Vermont
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Joined: Sun Feb 21, 2010 5:20 pm
Location: Northwest Vermont, Champlain Valley

I start my seeds in the containers you get rotisserie chickens in at the store. We buy a roasted chicken once in a while, they have a nice solid plastic pan for the base and a clear dome cover. Just about the right size to start two packages of tomato or pepper seed in each one.

When they set true leaves I move them up into plastic cell 4-pack trays. I set the trays in a standard 10x20 nursery flat, fill them with potting soil then flood the tray with water so the cells are literally filled with soggy mud. Then I flood the starter tray as well and let it set so it really loosens up.

Any sort of stick or plastic spoon to loosen the soil in the starter tray then gently tease the seedlings out of the resulting mud. I poke a hole in the mud in the cell with my finger then push the seedling, with any soil that clingss in the roots, into the finger depression. If the seedling comes out bare root I just drape the roots over the hole and press them down as far as I can. Pull my finger out and sort of puddle the mud back in around the stem and it's done. Maybe ten seconds a plant once the trays are prepped.

This year I put about 100 broccoli and cabbages in paper pots, 40 peppers, 54 tomatoes and 24 cauliflower in cell trays and so far 0 lost seedlings. There is one pepper that may not make it, it was barely sprouting, the seed case was still on it so it is chancey. Fourth year I have done it this way and never any appreciable plant loss.

They don't get potted up again, from here they go outdoors for a week or so here at home then they go to the garden and into the ground.

Tony02905
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Joined: Tue Apr 12, 2011 7:34 pm
Location: Massachusetts

I let my tomato plants get there third set of true leaves and re-potted them this oast weekend. It is true that it is a bit time cnsuming to separate them all, but even with some roots getting "torn" I managed to pot my first set, which gave me 32 individula tomatoes.

I was really surprised at how much they have grown since the weekend. They immediately took to their new homes! I'll have another set to separate by the end of the weekend as well, should give me at least 20 more plants. 5 seeds per peat pot.

I made my own gardening soil which I mixed plenty of organic compost. I was told that I wouldn't need any additional fertilizer since the compost has manure in it and it is slow release and won't burn. Is this true?
Love to Grow!



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