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hendi_alex
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I had a bad growing season last year as most plants died from blight about mid season. But the chocolates were some of my favorites, good balance between meat and juice and good balance between sweet and tart. I would recommend you try Black Carbon, Cherokee Chocolate, Cherokee purple, or Black Krim.
Eclectic gardening style, drawing from 45 years of interest and experience. Mostly plant in raised beds and containers primarily using intensive gardening techniques.
Alex

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Duh_Vinci
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Alex,

Good to see you around again! Surely you have some plants in the green house already! Let's hope for a better season this year! BTW, did you stick to "succession" planting last year as you planned originally?

alaskagold,

As Alex mentioned, Carbon, Cherokee's, Black Krim are usually the consensus for the "most liked" varieties. How long is your tomato growing season? I can send you some seeds, so you can try them, just PM me with your address.

Regards,
D

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hendi_alex
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Succession planting worked very well as usual. We had tomatoes until frost in November, but most of the mid season plants died very quickly over a two or three week period. I keep saying that I'll try the spraying routine with milk and hydrogen peroxide solution. Have yet to try that however.

Last year was one of the best ever, especially for cucumbers, squash, egg plant. Green beans didn't do as well in later summer plantings. The loss of the main crop of tomato plants so early in the year was frustrating however.

Here is a photo taken late in the tomato season. Photo was taken October 27th.

[img]https://farm5.static.flickr.com/4068/5120762673_293c50054a_o.jpg[/img]
Last edited by hendi_alex on Sat Feb 26, 2011 1:14 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Eclectic gardening style, drawing from 45 years of interest and experience. Mostly plant in raised beds and containers primarily using intensive gardening techniques.
Alex

tedln
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I like the idea of succession planting and tried it in a minor way last year by planting some plants about three weeks later than the originals. Two weeks later it was ninety five degrees and it went downhill from there.

This year, I am planting well defined early, mid season, and late season varieties all on March one. Since most of the earlies are determinate vatieties, I expect them to die early and I will replace them in a form of successive planting.

Good Luck with your garden alex.

Ted
I simply enjoy gardening!

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alaskagold
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DV, oh wow I would really appreciate that! It is hard to get seeds as many companies think I am in another country, it is quite annoying.

Our growing season varies. Last year, I like Hendi, had serious blight as it was a wet and humid year. I only got 4 tom's from my beef but I got quite a few from my micro patio. Normally, due to the sun, we get at least 2 months of full sun, even if it isn't the warmest, I have a nice canvas hot house 16x16 that works great.

I will pm you in a few. :) thanks!

tedln
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"DV, oh wow I would really appreciate that! It is hard to get seeds as many companies think I am in another country, it is quite annoying. "

hhhmmmm, I wonder if it's because of that little empty space between Alaska and the lower 48. NO WAiT! I bet it's because your closer to Russia than the lower 48. (Just kidding, I envy you for where you live) :D .

I don't know if you are aware of it, but many varieties have been bred as early season or short season varieties specifically for the Northern climates. Do a google search for Siberian and Kimberly varieties. I can't remember the website, but a guy in Canada sells seeds for varieties that perform well in his short season climate. I can find it if your interested.

Welcome to the forum.

Ted
I simply enjoy gardening!

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alaskagold
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Hi Ted :) thanks for the welcome.

My first tom plant was a Siberian hybred of an early girl variety. I have never found that type since. But it was a great producer.

I guess I need to suck it up and order them. It's time, I am just not very good at getting seed from tom's. But, I have grown corn up here... that was an experience all it's own!

akg

tedln
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I'm growing "Siberian Bushy" and "Siberian 2" this year as early varieties. I'm aware of about five "Siberian" varieties including simply Siberian. All of those are open pollinated instead of hybrid. I would offer to send seed, but I traded for them and only received five of one variety and ten of the other. I don't want to offer them to anyone until i have grown them out myself. I have read that you should avoid the varieties known as "Siberia" instead of "Siberian" They are short season, but supposedly have no taste.

Ted
I simply enjoy gardening!

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alaskagold
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Point taken, and I will watch what I order. Thnk you for the heads up Ted!

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Duh_Vinci
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Ted makes great point on varieties, and that's why I was asking about your growing season.

From what I've read, you area has an average of 100-110 days of frost free growing season, and June with extra day light can make a difference in the early production. So varieties you grow, are important, that is why your beefsteaks don't offer many fruits, they usually mid/late maturity fruits.

The earliest from "Black" varieties I know are Black Krim and Noir de Crimee (some say variation of original Black Krim), you can also try Spudakee (potato leaf version of Cherokee Purple), seems to be earlier, and more productive... I have the sees for these 3, will send you some to try. Let us know how they do in Alaska!

Regards,
D

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