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Duh_Vinci
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2011 Varieties List - finally decided

Somehow, there hardest part for me every year is to chose the varieties to grow. Cutting back a little (about 50% on tomato plants this year), so makes the deciding even more difficult :roll:

So my 2011 list for main garden is:

Ananas Noir
Armenian
Aunt Ruby's German Green
Black Krim
Brandeva (Brandywine OTV x Eva Purple Ball)
Brandywine Sudduth
Bull's Heart Pink
Cherokee Green
Cleota Pink
Cleota Yellow
Dawson's Russian Oxeheart
Dynnye
Everett's Rusty Oxheart
Hazel Gold
Heart Of The Bull
Jumbo Jim Orange
Lithuanian Crested Pink
Orange Minsk
Pink Berkley Tie-Dye
Prue
Reif Red Heart
Roger's Best Black
Sakharnyi Zheltyi
Spudakee
Spudatula
Striped Red Boar (Red Boar)
Wes
Wisconsin 55

Aside from the above, Delicious and Beefsteak for $2.00 garden project of $0.20 seeds. And hoping for a good summer, and less bugs this year :lol:

Will start seeds next weekend (first batch anyway)

Happy growing to all!

Regards,
D

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gixxerific
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That is quite a list. Hoping you the best this year I know last year was rough for you so this one has got to better right? :P

First batch you say. :lol: Nice, I did like 3 or 4 waves of toms last year.

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Duh_Vinci
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Less than half of what I grew last year, but I can easily manage these guys, and more room for other veggies to :lol:

Regards,
D

badata2d
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That's less than half ?? Wow, I guess I won't complain about trying to do too much in my little garden ! best wishes for a good 2011

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GardenRN
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Holy Smokes!!!! I wish I had room to do that many! How many plants of each variety are you aiming for? And out of curiosity, do you plant backup seedlings? how many?

And btw, you saying you're gonna start your seeds next weekend just gave me an excuse to jump the gun a little bit on my plan. :lol:
Jeff

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Failure is only a fact when you give up.

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Duh_Vinci
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Jeff,

If you think that's many, you may want to ask TZ-OH6 how many he grows :wink:

I usually plant in the ground only on of each variety, bucket's sometimes 2 of each, depending on variety and what I want to do with the fruit. As for the back up...

I plant 3 usually 3 seeds of each, and most of the time, I have at least 2 seedlings come up (bust 3 for majority). Once the first set of leafs are visible, the 2 strongest of the sprouts I up-pot, and they take off pretty quickly. The left overs, I just put into 3oz mouth wash cups, so they don't take much space. Those are early giveaways, I let others babysit them when 2-3 sets of true leafs present, and are 6" tall or so, there is always "demand" at work for early and healthy heirloom seedlings.

When it's time to transplant into the ground, I plant one of each of the stronger bunch, and keep the other seedlings for another week or two. If nothing is damaged by the frost, those are giveaways also, and they go very quickly too.

And yes, this coming weekend would be planting seeds for about 20 varieties. In a month another 3-5 and another 3-5 1st of May. Had to work this past weekend, otherwise would have started some seeds already :lol: I find that if I'm "too early" on some, it's rather easy to retard their growth by not up-potting them the second time.

So jump my friend! Mr. Phil said we are in for an early spring, is he right???

Regards,
D

dirtyfingers
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Just planted some seeds for my two favorites, carbon and pineapple. The carbon tomato looks weird as heck, but it is so sweet and juicy picked off the vine! Here's hoping for a great crop like last year!

tedln
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Nice list DV. You and I are growing many of the same varieties. It will be interesting to compare how well those varieties perform. Have you ever grown Orange Minsk? I'm growing a few orange varieties this year and have the feeling I may have missed one of the better ones by not growing it.

Ted
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Duh_Vinci
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Just looked through you list - yes indeed, many of the same varieties! Nice list you have there, looks well thought out! So definitely share some notes from this season!

Never grown Orange Mink, wanted last year, but opted for Orlov Yellow (Tatiana's favorite) and it was great. But so many speak highly of it, getting around to try it. Some other great oranges from last year were KBX (excellent taste and production), Orange Strawberry (monster producer, huge, unruly plant with sweet bright orange hearts) and absolute favorite Ludmila's Yellow Giant. Firm, sweet, just enough tartness to make it exciting, good keeper and near blemish free (moderate production though).

It is suggested by local farmers, that due to the mild winter, we will have many bugs again this year, so I think I'm doing the right thing, by not growing as many as I did last year, will be easier for me to attend to plants and plant many marigolds, and spray with neem and alike more often to keep the bugs out!

There is always next year to try few more =)

Regards,
D

tedln
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DV,

Have you grown Jaune Flamme before? I'm really anticipating what it will be like when it starts producing. I think everyone agrees that the KBX is a winner so I am looking forward to it also. Sungold also seems to be a consensus winner for a hybrid. I want to see what a tomato that is supposedly "so sweet it doesn't taste like a tomato", tastes like. The variety I am growing that really has me intrigued is the "Gary Ibsen's Gold". I received the seed as a bonus pack with an order from TomatoFest. Gary's blurb about the variety is that he received the seed in the mail as an "Old Family Heirloom" without a name. He grew it out for a few years and named it. It is the variety that I experimented on all winter. They should all be dead, but they kept on growing, so I am planting a couple of plants just to see how they produce and taste. I don't know if I can offer seed to anyone even if they do great under the promotional name. I may have to start calling it GI"s Gold or Ibsen's Gold if it does well.

Ted
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Cirtes
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Southern California List

Here is my list:

In ground and setting flowers (Greenhouse):
Three Each:

Fireworks
Black Crim

Six Each:
Azoychka
Bush Beefsteak
Early Wonder
Sophie's Choice
Rutgers Improved

Seeded four days ago for yard planting Mar/Apr:
Two Each:

Arkansas Traveler
Black Sea Man
Black Zebra
Brandy Boy
Brandywine Red
Carmello
Cherokee Purple
Earl of Edgecombe
Florida Pink
Green Zebra
Kellogg's Breakfast
Lemony
Marvel Striped
Mortgage Lifter Red
Mortgage Lifter Yellow
Moskovich
Purple Russian
Slava

Eight of (Gazebo Shade Crop):
Italian Tree

I actually seed 100% more then pick the most vigorous plants for the yard and give away the rest.
Sunset Zone 21 - USDA Zone 10

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Duh_Vinci
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Ted,

I've tried Jaune Flamme twice, first time - lost to frost, and had no spares, second time - deer ripped it out. But I'm determined, trying it again, should be fairly early and nice balance of tart with a hint of sweetness. So indeed, looking forward to it!

Cirtes - very nice list! Have a nice growing season!

Today is THE day, starting majority of my main varieties :lol:

Regards,
D

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hendi_alex
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I was having a terrible time culling down the number of varieties and plants. I like to plant between 25-40 plants each year. But I want insurance for my favorites and grow between 3-5 Delicious, 3-4 sweet cluster, 2 juliets. That really limits me on the other 20-30 plants. Anyway, was having such a tough time decided, I ended up doing something really wacky, and opted for pot luck. Last fall I took all of my green tomatoes and dumped them in a single baggy called 'green tomatoes'. Took all of my indeterminate large tomatoes and dumped them together in a baggy called beefsteak. Consolidated all purple and chocolates into a baggy called black. Another baggy is called roma. Delicious, Juliet, and Sweet cluster are the only plants that I'll know their true i.d. The rest will just be surprises. I planted five seeds from each mixed bag.
Eclectic gardening style, drawing from 45 years of interest and experience. Mostly plant in raised beds and containers primarily using intensive gardening techniques.
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tedln
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aallllleeeex!

Missed you!

I like your idea. My fear is that I would love one so much and not have an idea what it is. When my friends tour my garden, I could honestly tell them "I don't know" when they ask what a variety is.

Hope you have a great year.

Ted
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alaskagold
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I have yet to grow chocolate or purples.

I want to order some, but hesitate as I know of no one up here who has ever grown them.

Any advice? Do they grow the same as beef, early girls, etc?

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hendi_alex
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I had a bad growing season last year as most plants died from blight about mid season. But the chocolates were some of my favorites, good balance between meat and juice and good balance between sweet and tart. I would recommend you try Black Carbon, Cherokee Chocolate, Cherokee purple, or Black Krim.
Eclectic gardening style, drawing from 45 years of interest and experience. Mostly plant in raised beds and containers primarily using intensive gardening techniques.
Alex

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Duh_Vinci
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Alex,

Good to see you around again! Surely you have some plants in the green house already! Let's hope for a better season this year! BTW, did you stick to "succession" planting last year as you planned originally?

alaskagold,

As Alex mentioned, Carbon, Cherokee's, Black Krim are usually the consensus for the "most liked" varieties. How long is your tomato growing season? I can send you some seeds, so you can try them, just PM me with your address.

Regards,
D

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hendi_alex
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Succession planting worked very well as usual. We had tomatoes until frost in November, but most of the mid season plants died very quickly over a two or three week period. I keep saying that I'll try the spraying routine with milk and hydrogen peroxide solution. Have yet to try that however.

Last year was one of the best ever, especially for cucumbers, squash, egg plant. Green beans didn't do as well in later summer plantings. The loss of the main crop of tomato plants so early in the year was frustrating however.

Here is a photo taken late in the tomato season. Photo was taken October 27th.

[img]https://farm5.static.flickr.com/4068/5120762673_293c50054a_o.jpg[/img]
Last edited by hendi_alex on Sat Feb 26, 2011 1:14 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Eclectic gardening style, drawing from 45 years of interest and experience. Mostly plant in raised beds and containers primarily using intensive gardening techniques.
Alex

tedln
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I like the idea of succession planting and tried it in a minor way last year by planting some plants about three weeks later than the originals. Two weeks later it was ninety five degrees and it went downhill from there.

This year, I am planting well defined early, mid season, and late season varieties all on March one. Since most of the earlies are determinate vatieties, I expect them to die early and I will replace them in a form of successive planting.

Good Luck with your garden alex.

Ted
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alaskagold
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DV, oh wow I would really appreciate that! It is hard to get seeds as many companies think I am in another country, it is quite annoying.

Our growing season varies. Last year, I like Hendi, had serious blight as it was a wet and humid year. I only got 4 tom's from my beef but I got quite a few from my micro patio. Normally, due to the sun, we get at least 2 months of full sun, even if it isn't the warmest, I have a nice canvas hot house 16x16 that works great.

I will pm you in a few. :) thanks!

tedln
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"DV, oh wow I would really appreciate that! It is hard to get seeds as many companies think I am in another country, it is quite annoying. "

hhhmmmm, I wonder if it's because of that little empty space between Alaska and the lower 48. NO WAiT! I bet it's because your closer to Russia than the lower 48. (Just kidding, I envy you for where you live) :D .

I don't know if you are aware of it, but many varieties have been bred as early season or short season varieties specifically for the Northern climates. Do a google search for Siberian and Kimberly varieties. I can't remember the website, but a guy in Canada sells seeds for varieties that perform well in his short season climate. I can find it if your interested.

Welcome to the forum.

Ted
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alaskagold
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Hi Ted :) thanks for the welcome.

My first tom plant was a Siberian hybred of an early girl variety. I have never found that type since. But it was a great producer.

I guess I need to suck it up and order them. It's time, I am just not very good at getting seed from tom's. But, I have grown corn up here... that was an experience all it's own!

akg

tedln
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I'm growing "Siberian Bushy" and "Siberian 2" this year as early varieties. I'm aware of about five "Siberian" varieties including simply Siberian. All of those are open pollinated instead of hybrid. I would offer to send seed, but I traded for them and only received five of one variety and ten of the other. I don't want to offer them to anyone until i have grown them out myself. I have read that you should avoid the varieties known as "Siberia" instead of "Siberian" They are short season, but supposedly have no taste.

Ted
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alaskagold
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Point taken, and I will watch what I order. Thnk you for the heads up Ted!

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Duh_Vinci
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Ted makes great point on varieties, and that's why I was asking about your growing season.

From what I've read, you area has an average of 100-110 days of frost free growing season, and June with extra day light can make a difference in the early production. So varieties you grow, are important, that is why your beefsteaks don't offer many fruits, they usually mid/late maturity fruits.

The earliest from "Black" varieties I know are Black Krim and Noir de Crimee (some say variation of original Black Krim), you can also try Spudakee (potato leaf version of Cherokee Purple), seems to be earlier, and more productive... I have the sees for these 3, will send you some to try. Let us know how they do in Alaska!

Regards,
D

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