Binkalette
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"Better Bush" Tomatoes, I'm impressed!!

I grew 2 "Better Bush" tomatoes this year, and now I don't think I'll ever grow a different variety!! The first thing to impress me was the big, thick stems the plant has. It is strong enough to stand up on it's own, even when it's weighed down by all the tomatoes! I had my first tiny green tomato show up a few weeks ago, and now my plants are COVERED in medium to large sized tomatoes, the first of which started blushing this week. I picked the first two ripe ones today and cut them up and I am so pleased!! They are nice sturdy tomatoes with a wonderful flavor, and very few seeds, they are very meaty! I think I've found my tomato!! I'll have to post pictures when I get on my computer.

garden5
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Is that an heirloom or a hybrid? Don't worry, I'm not going to get into an argument over it :lol:.

It sounds like a variety to put on the list for next year. Has anyone else experience the same with it?
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LindsayArthurRTR
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I have the same feelings about Marglobe, Rutgers, Black Krim, Sugary Grape, and this mystery yellow tomato. The first 3 were intentional plantings and the last two were surprises :() All 5 were new varieties for me and they are all heirloom. All 5 will be repeaters for next year. I have seeds fermenting now :() Marglobe has been my personal favorite flavor this year.
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MaryDel
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It's hard to beat Rutgers IMO. I grow 25 every year for Sauces, but they are fantastic for fresh eating too.

I grew black krims this year, and I really was not that impressed.

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stella1751
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I grew Better Bush last year. I was impressed, too. They were in a constant state of production all the way through the summer and fall, and the tomatoes were huge for such a small plant. Mine went all over the place, though. I tried staking them, but they just did their own thing :-)

They're a hybrid. I thought they'd make a great container tomato. Mine never got over 3' tall, maybe less.
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storyteller
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stella1751,

I am growing two Better Bush in containers this year; my first attempt with this variety. Mine are right at 48" tall and have been producing well also. The info I read about them online suggests that they don't need to be staked, but after buying the plants at Costco in the last week of March, I went to Home Depot and bought a cage for each, along with three stakes.

When I bought them, they were already in blossom and had about 10-20 pea sized tomatoes on each plant. They came in 3-Gal pots so I transplanted them into 5-Gal pots, adding a good organic mix with about 30% Vermiculite and topped with bark after watering them in. My first fruits were a bit small, but they have been averaging in size now about 4- inches.

Bon Appetit!
stella1751 wrote:I grew Better Bush last year. I was impressed, too. They were in a constant state of production all the way through the summer and fall, and the tomatoes were huge for such a small plant. Mine went all over the place, though. I tried staking them, but they just did their own thing :-)

They're a hybrid. I thought they'd make a great container tomato. Mine never got over 3' tall, maybe less.
Faith never knows where it is being led, but it loves and knows the One Who is leading. -Oswald Chambers "My Utmost for His Highest" March 19, 761 L

ruggr10
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All this talk of toms on vines makes me sad.... I'm still in the process of hardening my off since it's in the low 40s at night here in Maine!

We're almost there!

wordwiz
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I looked at Better Bush but instead opted for Bush Goliath. Impressive looking seedlings, just like the way you described the BB.

Oddly, another variety is Rutgers - the first year I have tried them. Rounding out the array are Celebrity, BHN 589 and Early Wonder.

I hope all of them are keepers but two of five will probably make it!

Mike

armac
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I have the Bush Goliath as well, they sound very similar. My Bush Goliath is standing up to the 40 mph gusts we have been getting down here in South Texas.

churchilllarry
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Is the better bush a nemetode resistant plant. I just moved to sw FL and menatodes are terrible. I am looking for one that is resistant. Thanks
bb

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digitS'
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Tomato Growers Supply says:

Better Bush is a "VFN" variety.

The "N" is for resistant or tolerant to nematodes.

Steve
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Tonio
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I didn't know FL has nematode issues.. as we do in So CAL.

There is actually a pesticide( biological control) for nematodes.. another species of nematodes... sorry I can't remember now. Hopefully someone has it in short order.

T

p.s. perhaps a separate thread would suffice for specific attention since the thread quite old?
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JoyousFaith
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Planted my first tomato plant EVER today- chose the Better Bush. It does not have any fruit yet, but stands at almost 12 inches right now. Planted it in a container in full sun. I'm praying it turns out some good fruit! I am a total novice at veggie/fruit planting, so any basic tips you all could share would be wonderful! I've been reading forum notes all day, but I'm anxious to learn as much as possible!

lily51
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This is good to hear, as I'll be tring this variety for the first time this year.
Another one I'm trying that a friend said was great is Salsa.
So many varieties, son little time !

JoyousFaith
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FRUIT!

Hi all! I just posted here that on the 3rd of this month I planted my very first tomato plant (first try at fruit or veggies ever-) and tonight I found my very first baby tomato!!! I'm doing a happy dance! :-() Dozens of blossoms on the plant, and one baby fruit. I'm so excited! I love tomatoes, and I'm super encouraged by how this plant is turning out!
Ps... have seeded squash and green peppers since... hoping I get as good a result with those as I did with this plant!

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rainbowgardener
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congratulations on first fruit! You will LOVE how your garden grown tomatoes taste!

Re the nematodes, it helps to plant a bunch of marigolds around your tomatoes. They exude a substance from their roots that is repellant to the nematodes.


"Another possible solution may be the solid planting of marigolds for 3 months in areas heavily contaminated with nematodes. The marigold, when grown on soil infested with nematodes, suppresses the population of these nematodes and reduces the numbers found in the roots of susceptible host plants. Three compounds of an a-terthienyl type, toxic to nematodes, have been identified in root exudates from these plants. Terthienyls are released from growing roots, even without their decay, but benefits require three to four months to become clear. There is some evidence that a-terthienyl is inhibitory to some plant-pathogenic fungi too. Marigolds also function as a trap crop since larvae which penetrate the roots do not develop beyond the second larval stage and do not lay eggs."

https://aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/archives/parsons/fallgarden/nematode.html
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