lesgold2002
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AL KUFFA TOMATOES

Howdy Clan,

I'm excited about the fairly new variety available here...the Al Kuffa from Iraq. Has anyone experience with this kind? Do they need staking? Spacing? Hints?

Les Thanks!

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Duh_Vinci
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Well, I've never grown it myself, but I did order some seeds to send to a fried to Europe at her request last year...

If I remember correctly, it is a very compact plant, may even be dwarf, that produces well into the frost.

I hope that someone can provide more details, but it is not very widely known variety, so don't forget to post some pictures and let us know how it does in your garden!

Regards,
D

cynthia_h
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An on-line search returned the information (from a vendor I personally have had good dealings with) that the Al Kuffa tomato grows on "compact, dwarf" vines and is a "mild" tomato.

It is, as you say, a species native to Iraq. Perhaps deserving of wider repute among gardeners... :)

Cynthia H.
Sunset Zone 17, USDA Zone 9

lesgold2002
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That sounds good! Now if they will survive the heat and humidity of the Gulf Coast.

Thanks, ya'll.

Les

JulieTAdolf
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I ordered this as well and am curious to see how it performs! So far, it germinated really well--we'll see!
Julie

Tater
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Did anyone read the quote from the Iraqi gentleman in the Baker Creek catalog about these seeds? Sounds like a cool plant to try..

JulieTAdolf
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I love the Baker Creek catalog--and the note from the Iraqi gentleman is what led me to try this variety! Can't wait to taste the results! :-)
Julie

GardenGeek
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To be honest i am listening to this variety of Iraqi tomato for the first time in my life but i would give a try for the sake of an experiment. Who knows it grows really good :roll:

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digitS'
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Can those who grew the Al-Kuffa variety this year . . .

. . . tell us about your experiences?

Steve
We are each other's harvest; we are each other's business; we are each other's magnitude and bond. ~ Gwendolyn Brooks

tedln
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digitS' wrote:Can those who grew the Al-Kuffa variety this year . . .

. . . tell us about your experiences?

Steve
Steve,

I have seed to grow it next season. The following is the information I have on the variety.

deter, OP, 50 days, good taste, good yield, 6 oz, small plant

I've been told by people who grew it that it is a very early producer of ripe fruit on a plant under three feet tall. If you think about it, heavy production of 6 oz fruit on a plant just over two feet tall is a pretty good deal. I understand the fruit is also good tasting. I believe it is more of an upright tree type plant instead of a sprawling type of plant. I plan on growing three plants. Since it is such an early variety, it should bloom and set fruit with little danger of cross pollination with other varieties. I hope to have a lot of seed to share next fall.

Ted
I simply enjoy gardening!

Citrus
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I would like to try growing this variety myself. Does anyone have any seeds or know of a good place I could get some? :lol:

tedln
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I traded for the seed. I only got about five seed so I don't have any to send out this year, hopefully I will next year. I seem to remember seeing one vendor who had it when I was searching, but I don't remember which vendor. Do a google search for it.

Ted
I simply enjoy gardening!

gumbo2176
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[quote="lesgold2002"]That sounds good! Now if they will survive the heat and humidity of the Gulf Coast.



You ever see the summer temperatures in Iraq? The gulf coast in the summer would seem like spring to that region. But, we've got it all over them in the humidity department.

I don't know how our troops can handle that type weather with all the gear and protective flak jackets they wear while on patrol.

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digitS'
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Well, it is those hot, dry conditions that make me interested in this variety.

I did a little research on my summer climate and how it compares with the rest of the world. We often list our hardiness zones but that doesn't make sense for tomatoes - we aren't concerned about their ability to withstand the most severe temperatures of winter.

Anyway, my growing season is much the same as some locations in the Mediterranean region. If the winters here were not so severe, the climate would be classified as a Continental Mediterranean climate. However, I do not grow 80 days-to-maturity varieties; the fruit just doesn't have enuf time to ripen.

A couple, early-maturing Mediterranean varieties have done real well in my garden. However, most varieties that I can find are 80 day plus to maturity. Maybe . . . . I should head on into the Middle East :wink: !

Steve
who is a little concerned that those who said they would grow Al-Kuffa, never got back to tell us it did well for them . . .
We are each other's harvest; we are each other's business; we are each other's magnitude and bond. ~ Gwendolyn Brooks

Sani
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Well, Im from Kuwait and let me tell you the climate is very very harsh in the summer; tomatoes are grown in industrial greenhouses all year around because it reaches maximums of 50 degrees celcius in the summer, with almost no frost at all :(

tedln
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Steve,

"who is a little concerned that those who said they would grow Al-Kuffa, never got back to tell us it did well for them . . ."

Yea, I sent Duh_Vinci a PM about a month ago just checking to make sure he is okay. He disappeared from other forums at about the same time. He is a nice guy and I miss his comments. I have sent PM's to a few other folks who haven't been around much lately and I received replies letting me know they are okay and will return. Still haven't heard anything from Duh_Vinci.

Ted
I simply enjoy gardening!

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digitS'
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I noticed the name Duh_Vinci on another forum but that was quite a few months ago, Ted.

Sani!! What can you tell me about early maturing varieties from your part of the world?? (Now, I suppose :) , this is an official hijacking of this thread from what was intended by the Original Poster.)

I understand that "Early Girl," for example, is often grown here in the US in places like southern Arizona where summer temperatures are too hot for tomatoes. So, a very quick maturing variety is chosen for early planting. Well, I can't set them out in February, but I never have much trouble growing Early Girl.

I don't need a 50-day variety but a nice 68-day slicing tomato would be great . . . okay, let's go all the way to 75 days :wink: . Aaand, no cracking, please!! That can be a real problem here.

Any ideas on an early-maturing outdoor tomato there in Kuwait, Sani?? Maybe I can find the seeds . . .

Steve
We are each other's harvest; we are each other's business; we are each other's magnitude and bond. ~ Gwendolyn Brooks



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