SDGardener
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Location: San Diego, CA

New guy here. Need help.

I am new to this forum, as of today. I am new to gardening as well and was going off of advice from Home Depot. My tomato plant is in need of help. All was going good and then it seems in the matter of a week, leaves starting turning yellow, wilting and then healthy green leaves starting to form small black spots. I only have one tomato on the plant which is still green and just smaller than a golf ball, but the bottom of it didn't form right and it almost looks like a crack along it. We just had a lot of rain and temps have been in the 50's to 60's. This is a "beefmaster" tomato plant, as listed at Home Depot.

Thanks,
Vince

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rainbowgardener
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Joined: Sun Feb 15, 2009 11:04 pm
Location: TN/GA 7b

tomato problems

Sorry, we do try to be helpful. I think nobody really had a good answer, so we were all hoping someone else would jump in.

It helps if you can post a picture (instructions for that are in the introductory section Helpful Tips and Suggestions for New Members). Otherwise, the more information you can give us, the more likely someone will be able to help. For example, you said lots of rain. How well drained is the area for getting rid of the rain? What is your soil like? Have you been fertilizing the tomatoes (with what)?

Here's some thoughts off the top of my head: 50's is a little low for tomatoes. Not that they can't survive it, but they don't thrive real well (especially if that is day time high temps and night time temps are lower).
Lots of rain could mean they are a bit over watered and not getting enough sun. Also the cracking tends to happen when there's variable moisture -- the tomatoes dry out a bit and the skin hardens up and then a bunch of rain comes and they expand faster than the skin can stretch. Cure is to try not to let them dry out between the rains.

Yellowing leaves and black spots could be a disease, early blight or something like that. Lots of rain is conducive to fungal conditions. A good treatment for fungal diseases is to dilute some milk with water, to half and half or so, let the mixture stand at room temperature for a few hours to develop better bacterial culture (you could even add a spoonful of yoghurt to help it along) and spray it on all the leaves (including undersides). If it keeps raining, you would have to redo the treatment after the rain.

You may just have started your tomatoes a little soon. Once the weather warms up and the rains go away, they should do better.

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gixxerific
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Location: Wentzville, MO (Just West oF St. Louis) Zone 5B

SDGardener wrote:Wow. Not such a helpful site afterall. Thanks everybody. 36 views and no response.
Easy now, you won't find a better site on the net, I have been to most of them, trust me on this. Please don't go away mad, or at all for that matter.

Rainbow was right though it may just be too cold for Tom's. Let's hope this is not another rerun of last year with big box store tomatoes bringing disease throughout the country.

Stick around it aint so bad and good luck. Can you take it back, probably not but worth a shot.

flgardenman
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Location: Orlando, FL

Re: New guy here. Need help.

SDGardener wrote:I am new to this forum, as of today. I am new to gardening as well and was going off of advice from Home Depot. My tomato plant is in need of help. All was going good and then it seems in the matter of a week, leaves starting turning yellow, wilting and then healthy green leaves starting to form small black spots. I only have one tomato on the plant which is still green and just smaller than a golf ball, but the bottom of it didn't form right and it almost looks like a crack along it. We just had a lot of rain and temps have been in the 50's to 60's. This is a "beefmaster" tomato plant, as listed at Home Depot.

Thanks,
Vince
I am also new to this forum but, I have gardened for many years and have raised a lot of tomatoes. At this time I have 16 seedlings I am growing indoors for my spring garden.

From what your saying, it definitely sounds as though you have a over watering problem. IMO all symptoms you have described are a result of over watering. Also if your daytime highs have been running in the 50 and 60s your nighttime lows are probably too cold for your tomato to set fruit. As your weather improves, hopefully so will your tomato plant.

vermontkingdom
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Joined: Sun Nov 08, 2009 1:03 pm
Location: 4a-Vermont

I agree with the temperature being too low and soil too wet. Those conditions can be corrected fairly easily. What concerns me more however is the spotting of the leaves. Early blight loves cool, wet conditions and once it starts, it's difficult to destroy without fungicides.
"Good gardeners do not have green thumbs. They have brown knees, soiled hands and big hearts."

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