mikeingeorgia
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Tomatoes near broccoli?

Hey all, I read in the vegetable gardening area that you couldn't grow tomatos near broccoli, why is that? And how far away from them should they be?
USDA Zone 7

mbaker410
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I am not sure why but I grew tomatoes and broccoli in the same garden last year with only a row of jalepenos in between the two. I would say that it was about 3 feet or so in between.

The broccoli was devoured by insects but besides that I had healthy plants and 6' + tomatoes.

I would be interested in hearing the issues as well.

Mike

mbaker410
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I actually just saw this on another post.
Basil is one of the good companion plants for tomatoes. According to a table from catalystmagazine.net, the following are good companions for tomatoes. Basil, bee balm, broccoli, canlendula, cauliflower, cabbage, carrots, onions, parsley, sage for improved growth and flavor. Borage and dill to reduce pests.
So maybe its actually good to do?

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Rob
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Just like anything else in the garden, if they're planted to close together, and are both fighting for the same nutrients, then someone's gonna suffer.

At least that's the way I 'figer it.
What happens in the event horizon, stays in the event horizon.

The Helpful Gardener
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Seems that tomatoes like broccoli big time...

[url]https://westernfarmpress.com/vegetables/verticullium-tomatoes-0408/[/url]

More proof that it is all in the soil, and that Mother Nature always does nice work.... :D

HG
Scott Reil

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tomatoes near broccoli

That's what makes gardening so interesting. Check this article on companion planting for tomatoes (not scientific research more like a compendium of lore) https://gardening.about.com/od/totallytomatoes/qt/Tomato-Companions.htm

It gives these as good companions and gives some reasons why: Plants Recommended for Companion Planting with Tomatoes: amaranth, asparagus, basil, bean, calendula (pot marigold), carrots, celery, chive, cleome, cosmos, cucumber, garlic, lemon balm, lettuce, marigold, mint, nasturtium, onion, parsley, peas, sage, stinging nettle and sow thistle.

Then it gives things not to plant with tomatoes and broccoli tops the list
Cabbage (Brassica) Family - All relatives of cabbage stunt the growth of tomato plants, (incl: broccoli, Brussels sprouts, cabbage, collards, cauliflower, Kale, kohlrabi, rutabaga, turnip).

I in fact have broccoli planted in the bed with tomatoes, which I have done before. It works well because the broccoli is done early. By the time the tomatoes are getting really big and taking over the bed, I can pull the broccoli. Having just recently read the above, I was considering moving my broccoli.... now I'm just confused :?

The Helpful Gardener
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Okay, here's the deal...

"In rotation with" means one or the other, not both at the same time, so the article I posted does not contradict the other article. Here's why not together; Brassicas are alternate hosts for Pseudomonas solanacearum, or bacterial blight...

[url]https://www.memidex.com/p-solanacearum[/url]

In good organic soil we have a plethora of biology taking up available habitat, so RG has not had problems; in a biodiverse system it is hard for pathogens to shoulder enough room to get a good start. In a chemical culture system we have knocked big holes in the biota and pathogens have room for a running start and to build a population. Organic culture has likely mitigated the worst of the issue (protozoas eat ALL bacteria, including badguys). Plus RG has been pulling the broccoli when it is done, removing the source just as tomatoes are finding their feet. Which is probably why RG has had no issue... and why there are NO absolutes in gardening...

So best to keep them seperated, but if you can, switch them back and forth from season to season...sorry about the confusion...

HG
Last edited by The Helpful Gardener on Mon Apr 20, 2009 4:59 am, edited 1 time in total.
Scott Reil

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rainbowgardener
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rotation!

Thanks so much HG (Helpful Guy!). There's always more to learn! :)

mikeingeorgia
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Ok, well, since I already have them planted, I guess I'll leave them the way they are. But my tomato plant is very small, only about 4" tall at the moment while the broccoli is big enough that it should be producing something edible soon. So, once I get the broccoli, the tomato plant should just be getting big enough to start producing so I'll pull up the broccoli plants and put them in the compost pile. So many things to consider......
USDA Zone 7

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