petalfuzz
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I just got my seeds in. Tomato growers supply was out of Carbon black tomato and substituted Paul Robeson. I'm fairly disappointed because black tomatoes don't grow very well this far north, and I knew Carbon was pretty much the safest bet for my climate. I'll just have to wait and see now.

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hendi_alex
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Location: Central Sand Hills South Carolina

A quick search and here is a site for the Carbon black tomato.

$2.50 plus $3.50 shipping - perhaps use this as an opportunity to try something else new, so shipping per pack is not so steep

https://www.amishlandseeds.com/tomatoes_colors.htm
Eclectic gardening style, drawing from 45 years of interest and experience. Mostly plant in raised beds and containers primarily using intensive gardening techniques.
Alex

Trish-A
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Posts: 48
Joined: Thu Oct 23, 2008 6:23 pm
Location: SW PA - Zone 6a

This season we are going with...
10 Mortgage Lifters
10 Pink Brandywine Heirlooms
10 Box Car Willies
5 Experimental Hybrids :?:

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hendi_alex
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Location: Central Sand Hills South Carolina

I'm not into canning or freezing tomatoes but love to experiment, and have the luxury of many varieties. By the time the planting list includes my favorites plus several new varieties to try (this year heirlooms), and of course growing two or three plants of each variety just to be on the safe side, the tomato population swells to 25-40 plants. Can't imagine what I'll do if they all produce a bumper crop one year. During the summer we usually eat the equivalent of two medium sized tomatoes per day. Two or three vigorous plants should provide that when in peak production. Should have an awful lot to export, making friends and acquaintances very happy.
Eclectic gardening style, drawing from 45 years of interest and experience. Mostly plant in raised beds and containers primarily using intensive gardening techniques.
Alex

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applestar
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Location: Zone 6, NJ (3/M)4/E ~ 10/M

Okay, I've caught the tomato bug too :lol:
After last year's lackluster performance from the farmer's market transplants, I've gone ahead and ordered these seeds (HL= Heirloom, OP=open pollinated, OG=organic)

Moskvich (HL) 60 days Ind. Rich taste 4~6oz OG
Bellstar (OP?) 65 days Det. Favorite early plum 4 oz OG
Principe Borghesi (OP) 75 days Det. Sm plum. For sun drying
Valencia (HL) 76 days Ind. Best flavor. Orange color 8~10oz OG
Lyn's Mahogany Garnet (OP) 70~80 days Det. Black Russian x Gr. Zebra 8 oz

Add to them the seeds from last year's Grape tomato (unnamed) plus the 3 mystery tomato seedlings that have started growing (way too early!) from compost used for indoor winter garden. 8) Hopefully they won't be too stressed before they can go out :roll: One of them needs to be planted up into a 1qt pot right away! :shock:

BTW - I've followed the nursery's ID for HL and OP. I'm pretty sure they are interchangeable terms -- i.e. basically you can save the seeds of the tomatoes and grow the same characteristic plants. I'm a bit confused about whether this is still true if I grow all these tomatoes near each other though.... :?:

TZ -OH6
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Location: Mid Ohio

BHN 589 VFFT Hybrid and its relatives suffer mainly from having a code name. There are several numbered Heinz varieties as well, but "Heinz" is more user friendly than "BHN". Obviously they were bred for commercial growers, but I wonder why the producer's didn't rename them. "Happy Smiley Red" would be a stupid name but wouldn't scare people off.

Believe it or not the disease resitances on those big beefsteaks [VFFN] come from crossing with tiny currant tomatoes (a different species) several generations back, not mutation.

Planting far enough apart to avoid cross pollination is almost impossible for home gardeners because the tiny sweat bees that love tomato flowers hit pretty much every tomato in the garden before they fly off to unload their pollen collection. If you can walk to it they can find it and fly to it.

Cirtes
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Joined: Wed Feb 18, 2009 7:30 pm
Location: Mokelumne Hill, CA

Here goes my list

I selected the following mainly for good heat resistance:

Amana Orange
Amy’s Sugar Gem
Black Cherry
Black Krim
Black Prince
Bloody Butcher
Boondocks
Brandywine
Carmello
Costoluto Genovese
Fireworks
Italian Tree
Lemon Boy
Marvel Stripe
Mortgage Lifter Red
Mortgage Lifter Yellow
Mule Team
Super Sioux
Sunset Zone 21 - USDA Zone 10

elevenplants
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Posts: 187
Joined: Tue Mar 03, 2009 6:23 pm
Location: alabama

dang...

And here I already posted my varieties on another thread! Oh well. I'll just retype them here, it makes me happy to see them all listed!

Brandywine
Genovese Costoluto
Amish Paste
Beefsteak
German Tree
Bloody Butcher
Russian Black
Carbon
Cherokee Purple
Black Cherry

I can't wait!!! :D

Rebecca

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JustPeachy
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Joined: Thu Jan 29, 2009 5:16 am
Location: Eastern NC

Cherokee Purple and Yellow Pear! Never tried either of these but I am very excited about the Cherokee Purple...
;)

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segubs
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Joined: Mon Mar 02, 2009 12:25 am
Location: Texas

What all are you growing this year?!

Big Zac
Jetsonic
Champion 11
Goliath
Green Sausage
Green Zebra
Oxheart Red
Black From Tula

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applestar
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Posts: 28026
Joined: Thu May 01, 2008 11:21 pm
Location: Zone 6, NJ (3/M)4/E ~ 10/M

Wow! Some of you must have a huge garden! :shock:
How many plants to you plant, how much do you harvest, and what do you do with them all? 8)

elevenplants
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Posts: 187
Joined: Tue Mar 03, 2009 6:23 pm
Location: alabama

Last year I had 13 plants either in the ground or containers. Doesn't take up that much room, surprisingly. I just had them stuck here and there. This year, in a new locale, I have one bed prepared specifically for about 8 plants, and planters and containers for the rest. I hope to plant at least 15. I am usually blessed in the growing of tomatoes, harvesting enough to sauce, freeze, dry and otherwise preserve, and still have plenty to give away.

I'm also a pepper grower, and already have several sweet peppers and jalapenos in containers inside, and lots more to plant out when the time is right. I have had very good luck with pepper from seed. We even planted seed from one unidentified delicious pepper that we bought at a local tienda, and doggone if they didn't come up! 'Bout an inch and a half high and heading skyward. :o

Rebecca

Burner
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Joined: Sat Dec 22, 2007 10:26 pm
Location: Cottonwood, AZ

Wow. I feel so inadequate. :shock:

I was just going to go to Wal-Mart and pick up a Celebrity, a Beefsteak, and whatever cherry tomato was available. I already have an upside down hanging tomato plant going, but I can't remember the particular variety.

You guys have got me thinking about going with something kind of fancy.

Here's my bottom line with tomatoes: slice, salt, pepper, eat. Can anyone recommend a fantastic tasting slicer?

elevenplants
Senior Member
Posts: 187
Joined: Tue Mar 03, 2009 6:23 pm
Location: alabama

Here are three:

Brandywine
Beefsteak
Genovese Costoluto

Good luck!

Rebecca

damethod
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Posts: 183
Joined: Mon May 05, 2008 4:15 pm
Location: Miami, FL

Two good slicing tomatoes I've tried recently:

Brandywine
Box Car Willie

Burner
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Joined: Sat Dec 22, 2007 10:26 pm
Location: Cottonwood, AZ

Thanks for the replies.
I was doing a little research today, and a Brandywine is defitely going to be added to my garden. Thanks again.

Burner
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Joined: Sat Dec 22, 2007 10:26 pm
Location: Cottonwood, AZ

So...my "upgraded" tomato garden this year:

HL Red Beefsteak
HL Pink Brandywine
HL Soldacki
HL Black Krim
Hybrid Celebrity
Hybrid Sweet 100 Cherry
Mr. Stripey

elevenplants
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Joined: Tue Mar 03, 2009 6:23 pm
Location: alabama

Mmmmm! Sounds great, Burner! Let us know how the Mr. Stripey turns out. I grew those a couple of years ago here in zone 7a, and was disappointed in their yield, although the few I did get were wonderful flavor. Only had one plant. Next time I try them will probably do 3-4 plants for a decent yield. IF I ever try them again....there are soooo many varieties, I might not ever get back to them! :lol:

Rebecca

Burner
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Location: Cottonwood, AZ

Rebecca, my kids picked out Mr. Stripey. I saw the picture of it and told them "No." and then finally thought, what the heck, why not. I'll post the outcome here. :D

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tomatodude
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Posts: 21
Joined: Sat Mar 21, 2009 8:57 pm
Location: Texas

This year I'm growing the work horses, along with some new heirlooms.
Work Horses are...
Rutger (heirloom)
Celebrity
1) BHN 444
2) BHN 589
3) BHN 640
4) Black Krim x2
5) Brandywine Sudduth*
6) Carbon
7) Costoluto Genovese x2
8) German Red Strawberry
9) Giant Belgium
10) KBX* x2
11) Husky Red Cherry
12) Kellogg's Breakfast
13) Neves Azorean Red
14) Olena Ukrainian
15) Opalka x2
16) San Marzano*
17) Stump of the World

Squash

1) Golden Zucchini x4
2) Straighneck (yellow)x4
3) White Bush Vegetable Marrow (white) x4

Cucumber

Glorie de Paris x6
Burpee Hybrid
Lemon
Poinset 76

Looks to be a busy gardening season.

here's some pics...of this years garden..

[img]https://i56.photobucket.com/albums/g187/atascosa_tx/gardenpermulch.jpg[/img]

[img]https://i56.photobucket.com/albums/g187/atascosa_tx/raisedrows2.jpg[/img]

and my tx tiller

[img]https://i56.photobucket.com/albums/g187/atascosa_tx/Jdeere.jpg[/img]

I ran out of Coastal mulch....so I'll finish that on next Saturday..
Remember...Mulch is important to regulate moisture,,,the thicker the better,,,I use at least 5 inches
It's not what you Grow, it's How you grow it.

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tomatodude
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Location: Texas

Have to clarify...
my work horses are the BHN 444, 589, and 640's
along with the celebrity toms and Husky red cherry..
It's not what you Grow, it's How you grow it.

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Earl K
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Posts: 351
Joined: Sun Mar 22, 2009 1:44 am
Location: Melbourne ,Fl.

what im growing

this is my first time growing.my girl did 2 yrs. ago but i didnt get into it. i picked out the plants this time and theyre mine now! limited on space,so all in 5 gal. buckets i have-1 sweet 100-1 better boy -1 patio tomato,2 anehiem-1 giant marconi-1 jalepeno peppers,2 zucchini & 1 sequoia strawberry.all on the pool deck.already have fruit on all except zucchini &strawberry.happy gardening :D

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tomatodude
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Location: Texas

Glad to see that everyone has the "growing bug" this year!
Earl, once you start growing, you're gonna get hooked...oh and give those
zucchini squash a wide spacing, they can easily grow 3 foot wide or better.
Happy Gardening
It's not what you Grow, it's How you grow it.

ManokAnak
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Posts: 13
Joined: Wed Mar 25, 2009 5:39 am
Location: Chicago

San Marzano this year again. All the plants I grew were the size of bushes and had so many tomatoes we just finished all the sauce we made with them last month.

Unfortunatly i do not have much growing space and hope to do Costoluto Genovese next year also. I am a sucker for any variety with Genovese in the name.

I am very excited for tomato harvest and nothing is even in the ground yet.

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hendi_alex
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Joined: Sun Jul 06, 2008 11:58 am
Location: Central Sand Hills South Carolina

I'm going to have to try 'black krim'. The variety keeps popping up all over the place as folks talk about their favorite tomato varieties.
Eclectic gardening style, drawing from 45 years of interest and experience. Mostly plant in raised beds and containers primarily using intensive gardening techniques.
Alex

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Rob
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Posts: 63
Joined: Sun Mar 22, 2009 9:51 pm
Location: Cottonwood, AZ

I've got 4 black krim in my selection this year.
To be honest, all I REALLY care about are my tomatoes. Everything else is secondary.
What happens in the event horizon, stays in the event horizon.

elevenplants
Senior Member
Posts: 187
Joined: Tue Mar 03, 2009 6:23 pm
Location: alabama

I've seen that Black Krim mentioned a lot, too. Maybe next year. This year I am trying the Russian Black from Baker Seeds together with about 9 other varieties.

I've done a wild thing! :shock: I just decided on a whim the other day that since I have so many tomato plants going from seed (to give away, etc.), that I would go ahead and put a few in the ground and just see what happens to them, although it is still nearly a month from the recommended planting time for zone 7. What the heck. I planted them and the very next day we got rain for 2 straight days, with some cooler temps (though not below 50), and they held up fine under the pounding rain and seem to have 'latched on'.

We will see what we shall see....

Rebecca

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applestar
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Location: Zone 6, NJ (3/M)4/E ~ 10/M

If you don't have wall-o-waters, one recommendation I've seen is to use tomato cages surrounded with either clear plastic or, even better, bubblewrap. Tape down the end with clear packing tape and be sure the cages are securely staked so it doesn't blow over. As the weather warms up, you can cut slits in the side for ventilation and eventually take the plastic off, though I've seen mention of keeping a couple protected as long as possible for earlier crop. If severely cold temp threatens, you can toss a cover over the top opening. April 1, I'm going to try this myself with the two big volunteers that are getting too large for the windowsill. I thought the date is appropriate for such a crazy experiment. 8) :wink:

elevenplants
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Posts: 187
Joined: Tue Mar 03, 2009 6:23 pm
Location: alabama

Thanks, applestar. I happened to have enough bubble wrap on hand to do one, so I fixed it up for the german tree tomato I have put into a large concrete planter. We'll see how it works. Don't you love experimenting??

Rebecca

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applestar
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Location: Zone 6, NJ (3/M)4/E ~ 10/M

:-() :lol: I've been waiting for an opportunity to say this :lol: :-()
For some reason, every time I see your on-line name, I see "elvenpants" :oops:
I have to force myself to physically FOCUS and read "elevenplants" :roll: :hide:

Keep us posed on the progress of your German tree tomato. :wink:

elevenplants
Senior Member
Posts: 187
Joined: Tue Mar 03, 2009 6:23 pm
Location: alabama

:lol: :lol:

....elvenpants! I like it! And don't worry, I'll keep you posted on ALL my 'maters!

Rebecca

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Rob
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Posts: 63
Joined: Sun Mar 22, 2009 9:51 pm
Location: Cottonwood, AZ

I'll be checking back to this thread all year. We should post some pictures of our 'maters as they progress.

I just ordered some Purple Cherokee seeds. Anybody ever tried them? My expectations are high, as the reviews are very good (exceptional flavor, big slicer, etc).
What happens in the event horizon, stays in the event horizon.

elevenplants
Senior Member
Posts: 187
Joined: Tue Mar 03, 2009 6:23 pm
Location: alabama

Good idea about the pictures, Rob. Here's one of a Genovese Costulato almost ready for the ground. I have about 8 varieties. Yes, I'm trying the Cherokee Purple for the first time this year, the seedlings are just up, got a late start on those, they were backordered.

[img]https://i701.photobucket.com/albums/ww13/elevenpictures/photo-3.jpg[/img]

Rebecca

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Gary350
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Joined: Mon Mar 23, 2009 5:59 pm
Location: TN. 50 years of gardening experience.

My garden space is small so I only plant things we eat the most. 40 tomato plant, I will can about 70 pints and 10 quarts. Blue Lake bush beans, I will can about 60 pints. Silver Queen corn, I will freeze about 200 ears. Red Potatoes, bell peppers, 2 banana peppers, 1 chili pepper, yellow squash, okra, zucchini squash, carrots, onions, garlic, leaks, beets, 1 egg plant. I will plant greens late August and plant peas and beets in the snow. Winter crop, turnip green, swiss chard, kale, beets, peas.
Last edited by Gary350 on Fri May 08, 2009 3:37 am, edited 3 times in total.

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applestar
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When you say can green beans -- do they turn out like the canned beans in stores? I don't like limp canned green beans, but maybe it's different home canned? Also green beans have to be pressure canned, right?

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Gary350
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Location: TN. 50 years of gardening experience.

applestar wrote:When you say can green beans -- do they turn out like the canned beans in stores? I don't like limp canned green beans, but maybe it's different home canned? Also green beans have to be pressure canned, right?
Garden canned green beans in Mason jars actually turn out much better than can green beans from the grocery store. I pick about 2 bushel basket of beans, clean and snap them, then cook all day on the stove with seasoning. Season with bacon, sometimes potatoes, mix with other vegatable if you like. Pack it in mason jars, put on the seals and lids, put it in the water bath cooker and cook for the correct time. I don't recall the correct time without looking in my book but I think it is about 20 minutes for pints and 30 minutes for quarts. I have several large pots I can get 1 pot on each eye of the stove. I have one 12 gallon pot that covers 2 burners it holds about 25 mason jars. Sometimes I use the pressure cooker but my water bath is faster I can do 9 jars per pot or about 36 jars at a time with 4 pots.

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applestar
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Location: Zone 6, NJ (3/M)4/E ~ 10/M

Gary350, :shock: Wow, sounds like a lot of work! I'm not so sure if I'm ready for all that.... but thanks! If in my enthusiasm I end up with a whole lot of beans, I just might try it! :wink:

Elevenplants, "The April Fool" has been planted! :clap: I have a tomato cage wrapped with a whole (2 layers) white trash bag PLUS a wall-o-water around it. it's already wee bit of a tight fit (the leaves are touching the bag) but hopefully it'll be cozy enough for now. :roll:
[img]https://i290.photobucket.com/albums/ll272/applesbucket/Image3951.jpg[/img]

Really crazy considering the wind gusts of 40~50mph predicted in the next couple of days and low 30's lows in the next week... but here he is all tucked in for the evening :lol:
[img]https://i290.photobucket.com/albums/ll272/applesbucket/Image3953.jpg[/img]

Maybe after this cold snap is over, I can take off the bag and just use the wall-o-water. OR I'll have to go for a bigger cage and bubblewrap.

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hendi_alex
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Posts: 3567
Joined: Sun Jul 06, 2008 11:58 am
Location: Central Sand Hills South Carolina

No ground yet for any of my plants. They are cozy and warm in their one gallon to three gallon containers. All are growing rapidly with plenty of room for the roots to spread. Will wait until the weather is settled and the ground is nice and warm before putting the plants in the ground. We are supposed to dip into the 20's one day next week. Hopefully that will be the last cold air intrusion. Just so happens that I'm out of town next week and can't move the plants outside to inside and back. Guess I'll just stick them in the greenhouse with the whiteflies for a few days. Hopefully, the whiteflies won't get too attached to the plants. Really nuked the greenhouse today, while no veggie plants were inside. Hit the flies with a mix of orthene, merit, Enstar II hormone regulator, and oil spray.
Eclectic gardening style, drawing from 45 years of interest and experience. Mostly plant in raised beds and containers primarily using intensive gardening techniques.
Alex

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applestar
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Joined: Thu May 01, 2008 11:21 pm
Location: Zone 6, NJ (3/M)4/E ~ 10/M

You know, "The April Fool" was in a 1/2 gal. pot. Planting him deep (3 lower leaves removed) was a bit of an effort.... Do you know the whole while, I was envisioning your well-grown plants in those giant pots! Moving them in and out, planting them all.... More power to ya! :lol: Anyway, good luck with your tom's and don't worry, you're doing everything you can for 'em. :wink:

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hendi_alex
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Location: Central Sand Hills South Carolina

It has been pretty nice, since sizing the plants up all have stayed outside day and night for the past couple of weeks. Brought the four biggest plants in one night when the temp dropped to around 40, but left all others in two cold frames outside. They did just fine. So really have not had to move the plants much at all since they got larger. Had to move them often when they were small, but most all were in trays at that time. Only had about eight items to move in and out for a couple of weeks. Low thirties or into the 20's makes me too nervous to rely on the unheated cold frame, so this move will be a good bit of work, probably thirty or more containers. Still will take only 15 or 20 minutes each direction, and hopefully will be the last time they need to move into a warm area.
Eclectic gardening style, drawing from 45 years of interest and experience. Mostly plant in raised beds and containers primarily using intensive gardening techniques.
Alex

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