petalfuzz
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What all are you growing this year?!

Hi, everyone! We're under 12" of snow here and I'm fantasizing about my garden yet again. Actually I made out my list of seeds last night and am super excited to grow new varieties of tomatoes. I know some of you have tons more space than me to devote to tomatoes--so you grow tons more varieties too. What did you pick to grow this year and why?!

My selection is:
Grushovka--a plum sized pink paste tomato. Heirloom seed. Picked because I want an early paste tomato for sauces.

Lime Green Salad--a small sized green tomato with great flavor. I really just want to try a green variety.

Siletz--a very early red slicer. Picked because I wanted exactly that and traditional tomato taste.

Carbon--a black variety with excellent reviews. Supposedly tastes better and produces better than cherokee purple. I have yet to taste either, but want to try a black tomato.

I picked open-pollinated varieties because I want to try my hand at saving seed this year, also!

dahoss2002
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Location: Louisiana

I'm trying some Heirloom tomatoes this year too. Started my seeds indoors last Sunday and about 1/3 have sprouted. I purchased these seeds from tomatofest

Arkansas Traveler-
A 100 year old heirloom tomato that was grown throughout the South from northwest Arkansas to North Carolina. Our TomatoFest organic tomato seeds produce indeterminate, regular-leaf, 6', vigorous tomato plants that yield abundant crops of 8-ounce, round rose-pink tomatoes. Considered to be one of the best tasting tomato varieties with well balanced sweet/tart flavors. Arkansas Traveler is much esteemed for its ability to produce flavorful tomatoes under normally adverse conditions high heat, humidity or drought. Resistant to cracking and disease.


Creole-
An heirloom developed in Louisiana for hot, humid climates. This variety has a very loyal following. Yields 3-inch, round, firm, red fruit with a lots of juice and delicious tomatoey flavors with good acidity.



Italian Tree-
A winner as a market tomato for 2008! Our TomatoFest organic tomato seeds produce big, sprawling, indeterminate, potato-leaf, tomato plants that yield on vines that can grow to 15-feet, enormous amounts of meaty, 1-2 pound, 4-5-inch, red tomatoes with superior sweet flavors perfectly balanced with just the right amount of acid to make it shout, "Now that's old-fashioned tomato flavor!" This tomato plant should be trellised as each plant can bear bushels of fruit. This has been selected as one of the best tomatoes for supplying farmer's markets or entering in the County Fair. A good canning tomato or eating fresh off the vine or in salads. A great sandwich tomato. A Gary Ibsen "personal favorite."


Cherokee Chocolate-
Craig LeHoullier stabilized this rogue heirloom originating from the popular old heirloom from Tennessee, Cherokee Purple. This 4-inch beefsteak variety has developed a great following among celebrity chefs because of its exceptionall


Black Cherry-
The only truly black cherry tomato. Our TomatoFest organic tomato seeds produce large, sprawling, indeterminate, regular-leaf, vigorous tomato plants that yield abundant crops in huge clusters of 1", round, deep purple, mahogany-brown cherry tomatoes. Fruits are irresistibly delicious with sweet, rich, complex, full tomato flavors that burst in your mouth, characteristic of the best flavorful black tomatoes. Beautiful to mix with other colored cherry tomatoes. Unique tomato variety. Disease resistant. Once you try it...you want MORE.


Black Plum -
One of my favorite Russian varieties that produces a long and steady crop of 2-inch elongated plum-shaped fruits colored a beautiful deep-mahogany with dusky-green shoulders. Fruit resembles a small paste tomato but with thinner walls. Unique sweet tangy flavor.

Isis Candy-
This tomato produces a delightful, 1-inch round, yellow with red tinge and marbling. Gold flesh. Typically a 'cat's eye' star of yellow on one end of fruit. The delicious sweet taste is rich and fruity. This has been a favorite "candy" treat with kids at my tomato tastings.

Sugary-
A 2005 All-America Selections Award Winner and favorite among cherry tomato lovers. 1-inch, brilliant pinkish-red, oval-shaped cherry tomatoes with a pointed blossom end. Huge amounts of tomatoes produced in clusters with very sweet flavors. Great for good snacking, salads or adding to culinary dishes. A perfect choice for container or patio gardens.


I'd rather be lucky than good

TZ -OH6
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I'm growing a bunch of oddball things so I can get seed from them. I'm also trying some paste types (Prue, Opalka, Polish Linguisa) for the first time now that I have a new freezer in which to save sauce. And I have a bunch of top notch beefsteaks to compare (Rose, Brandywine-Sudduth, Stump O the World, Chapman, Red Penna).


Carolyn, I hope you know that Lime Green Salad is a little thing, so you can stick it just about anywhere, including a bucket.

petalfuzz
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TZ -OH6 wrote:Carolyn, I hope you know that Lime Green Salad is a little thing, so you can stick it just about anywhere, including a bucket.
Oh, yes, I read that! I had already picked out my top candidates but just had to add the lime green, especially when I learned the plants were small! Otherwise I'd just be growing three kinds!

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hendi_alex
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Location: Central Sand Hills South Carolina

I try to have a succession of tomatoes to ripen. Have found that the small varieties tend to ripen first, followed by larger salad type tomatoes, followed by the slicing tomatoes.

After quite a bit of testing and tasting, I have chosen my two early favorites.

Juliet is an oval salad tomato about two or three times the size of a plum tomato. They always ripen earliest for me, about one to two weeks earlier than any other tomato. The vines are vigorous and disease resistant and prolific as they give a tremendous yield over a long season.

Next to ripen is 'sweat cluster', round and about 1.5-2 inch diameter. Like 'Juliet', 'sweat cluster' is early, prolific, vigorous, giving a large harvest over a long season. For us 'sweet cluster' beat out '4th of July' and 'super sioux', both of which are great small sized tomatoes.

Last year was tomato drying year, which I do in alternating years. About half of our tomato space was dedicated to Roma types of tomatoes. This year that space will be given for an experiment with heirlooms. I've grow brandywine two or three years, but would like to try others. This year the heirlooms will include German Johnson, German Queen, and Cherokee Chocolate as well as the brandywine. I love the brandywine flavor, but give it negatives for its low production of fruit.

I will also plant one or two each of my favorite modern slicers: parks whopper, big bite, big beef, better boy, celebrity

MaggieMD
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Wow, I’m glad to find this thread – I was just deciding what to plant in the garden in 2009 (like everyone, winter makes me yearn for the garden). Last year, I grew 16 tomato varieties, including 4 cherry tomato varieties; I was trying to have all different colors. Unfortunately, mid season, most of them developed wilt, so it probably wasn’t a fair trial for the late producing varieties. But I was able to make some judgments on those I did get to taste, and made notes of those I wanted to plant again.

By far the best cherry tomato was Sun Sugar FT Hybrid (from tomato growers) – orange, sweet, and pretty disease resistant. The produced the earliest and the longest of the varieties. My second favorite was Husky Cherry Red, a “dwarf indeterminateâ€

MaggieMD
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Location: Southern Maryland

Wow, I’m glad to find this thread – I was just deciding what to plant in the garden in 2009 (like everyone, winter makes me yearn for the garden). Last year, I grew 16 tomato varieties, including 4 cherry tomato varieties; I was trying to have all different colors. Unfortunately, mid season, most of them developed wilt, so it probably wasn’t a fair trial for the late producing varieties. But I was able to make some judgments on those I did get to taste, and made notes of those I wanted to plant again.

By far the best cherry tomato was Sun Sugar FT Hybrid (from tomato growers) – orange, sweet, and pretty disease resistant. They produced the earliest and the longest of the varieties. My second favorite was Husky Cherry Red, a “dwarf indeterminateâ€

Billy
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The one I'm most excited about is the Momotaro. I have bought this tomato fresh at a farmers market near my house ... it's got a great flavor and very low acid..

Here is a description from the seed company.


Momotaro is one of the best tomatoes ever developed by Takii Seed Company in Japan. Upon receiving numerous requests by our customers from various regions and countries, we have decided to carry and are happy now being able to offer this outstanding variety, although seeds are relatively expensive. Momotaro is an indeterminate type and vigorous plant. Plants produce pink red deep oblate fruits, 220 grams in weight, which are very sweet and delicious. Momotaro bears a lot of fruits, 6 to 7 fruits per cluster. Tomato with tough skin is tolerant to clacking. Plants are highly tolerant to disease attacks such as Fusarium1, Nematode, Stemphylium and Verticillium. An excellent tomato for home gardening and fresh market.

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PennyG
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Location: Ontario, Canada

I still havent quite decided yet, but i know in the end i will have close to 30 types of tomatoes. :D

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Shaggy
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I'l also be trying some heirloom tomatoes this year... got a friend sending my 5 strains... not sure which yet... This year we will be moving the veg garden into a prime spot that my wife had always claimed for flowers but then never had time to weed. It will give me 10x20 and the tomatoes are going to go in a vertical rack up the back wall in passive hydroponics.. I'll post pics
Don't just Go through life
Grow through life

eshenry
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Location: Tennessee

already planted some seeds.......

Black Krim
Amish Paste
Brandywine
German Johnson
Old German
Hillbilly
Canestrino I
De Pinto
Earlyanna
Cherokee purple
texas wild
Some people weave burlap into the fabric of our lives, and some weave gold thread. Both contribute to make the whole picture beautiful and unique.

damethod
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Location: Miami, FL

I've got a couple of tomato plants already producing abundant fruit. Down here we start planting in October, so my plants are pretty much full grown.

I've got:

Black Plum Tomatoes
Box Car Willie Tomatoes
Roma Tomatoes
Brandywine Tomatoes
Romaine Lettuce
Hot Banana Peppers
Jalapeno Peppers
Orange and Chocolate Bell Peppers
Anaheim and Poblano peppers
Sweet Basil
Quinalt Strawberries
Sequoia Strawberries

The tomatoes were all started from seed. The pepper plants were starter plants purchased at Home Depot for $3. Peppers from seed can be a chore!

The black plum tomatoes have a good flavor and are a bit on the mushy side. I made an excellent pasta sauce with them and have used them in salads as well.

The box car willie was surprisingly sweet. One of the best large tomatoes I have tried.

The brandywines and romas are currently ripening. So, I haven't tried them yet.

MaggieMD
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Thanks for the feedback on Box Car Willie. I have some seeds but was debating whether to start them since I have about 20 other varieties and I do actually have a full time job, in addition to my gardening! I am very jealous of people who have fresh garden tomatoes in February!

I just got back from a Growers Convention in PA, by the way, and there was a session about tomato varieties and the results of taste tests. The presenter said that Brandy Boy (a “heritageâ€

damethod
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Location: Miami, FL

No problem Maggie. I just re-read your post and noticed that your brother didn't want to grow a hybrid tomato.

Hybrids are basically a combination of two or more plants which have certain desirable characteristics. One plant may grow large and beefy tomatoes, but with little disease resistance. A second plant may not produce as desirable a tomato, but is very disease resistant. So, they cross polinate the plants in order to obtain a single plant with both desirable characteristics.

If you plant two heirloom plants close to each other and save the seeds of their fruit. You may not get the same plants from those seeds. Therefore, you will have created a hybrid! :D

Another reason tomatoes and other plants are hybridized is to make them commercially desirable. Commercial fruits and vegetables must have no cracks, have full color, good size, AND ship well(probably most important).

Are there any experts around who can add to, refute, or endorse my claims? :?:

Billy
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Location: Southern California

started mine today

Black krim
Paul robeson
Vinson watts
Dixie golden giant
Anahi
Italian heirloom
Momotaro
Fantastic hybrid



:D

petalfuzz
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I just got my seeds in. Tomato growers supply was out of Carbon black tomato and substituted Paul Robeson. I'm fairly disappointed because black tomatoes don't grow very well this far north, and I knew Carbon was pretty much the safest bet for my climate. I'll just have to wait and see now.

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hendi_alex
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A quick search and here is a site for the Carbon black tomato.

$2.50 plus $3.50 shipping - perhaps use this as an opportunity to try something else new, so shipping per pack is not so steep

https://www.amishlandseeds.com/tomatoes_colors.htm
Eclectic gardening style, drawing from 45 years of interest and experience. Mostly plant in raised beds and containers primarily using intensive gardening techniques.
Alex

Trish-A
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Location: SW PA - Zone 6a

This season we are going with...
10 Mortgage Lifters
10 Pink Brandywine Heirlooms
10 Box Car Willies
5 Experimental Hybrids :?:

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hendi_alex
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I'm not into canning or freezing tomatoes but love to experiment, and have the luxury of many varieties. By the time the planting list includes my favorites plus several new varieties to try (this year heirlooms), and of course growing two or three plants of each variety just to be on the safe side, the tomato population swells to 25-40 plants. Can't imagine what I'll do if they all produce a bumper crop one year. During the summer we usually eat the equivalent of two medium sized tomatoes per day. Two or three vigorous plants should provide that when in peak production. Should have an awful lot to export, making friends and acquaintances very happy.
Eclectic gardening style, drawing from 45 years of interest and experience. Mostly plant in raised beds and containers primarily using intensive gardening techniques.
Alex

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applestar
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Location: Zone 6, NJ (3/M)4/E ~ 10/M

Okay, I've caught the tomato bug too :lol:
After last year's lackluster performance from the farmer's market transplants, I've gone ahead and ordered these seeds (HL= Heirloom, OP=open pollinated, OG=organic)

Moskvich (HL) 60 days Ind. Rich taste 4~6oz OG
Bellstar (OP?) 65 days Det. Favorite early plum 4 oz OG
Principe Borghesi (OP) 75 days Det. Sm plum. For sun drying
Valencia (HL) 76 days Ind. Best flavor. Orange color 8~10oz OG
Lyn's Mahogany Garnet (OP) 70~80 days Det. Black Russian x Gr. Zebra 8 oz

Add to them the seeds from last year's Grape tomato (unnamed) plus the 3 mystery tomato seedlings that have started growing (way too early!) from compost used for indoor winter garden. 8) Hopefully they won't be too stressed before they can go out :roll: One of them needs to be planted up into a 1qt pot right away! :shock:

BTW - I've followed the nursery's ID for HL and OP. I'm pretty sure they are interchangeable terms -- i.e. basically you can save the seeds of the tomatoes and grow the same characteristic plants. I'm a bit confused about whether this is still true if I grow all these tomatoes near each other though.... :?:

TZ -OH6
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BHN 589 VFFT Hybrid and its relatives suffer mainly from having a code name. There are several numbered Heinz varieties as well, but "Heinz" is more user friendly than "BHN". Obviously they were bred for commercial growers, but I wonder why the producer's didn't rename them. "Happy Smiley Red" would be a stupid name but wouldn't scare people off.

Believe it or not the disease resitances on those big beefsteaks [VFFN] come from crossing with tiny currant tomatoes (a different species) several generations back, not mutation.

Planting far enough apart to avoid cross pollination is almost impossible for home gardeners because the tiny sweat bees that love tomato flowers hit pretty much every tomato in the garden before they fly off to unload their pollen collection. If you can walk to it they can find it and fly to it.

Cirtes
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Location: Mokelumne Hill, CA

Here goes my list

I selected the following mainly for good heat resistance:

Amana Orange
Amy’s Sugar Gem
Black Cherry
Black Krim
Black Prince
Bloody Butcher
Boondocks
Brandywine
Carmello
Costoluto Genovese
Fireworks
Italian Tree
Lemon Boy
Marvel Stripe
Mortgage Lifter Red
Mortgage Lifter Yellow
Mule Team
Super Sioux
Sunset Zone 21 - USDA Zone 10

elevenplants
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Joined: Tue Mar 03, 2009 6:23 pm
Location: alabama

dang...

And here I already posted my varieties on another thread! Oh well. I'll just retype them here, it makes me happy to see them all listed!

Brandywine
Genovese Costoluto
Amish Paste
Beefsteak
German Tree
Bloody Butcher
Russian Black
Carbon
Cherokee Purple
Black Cherry

I can't wait!!! :D

Rebecca

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JustPeachy
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Cherokee Purple and Yellow Pear! Never tried either of these but I am very excited about the Cherokee Purple...
;)

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segubs
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Joined: Mon Mar 02, 2009 12:25 am
Location: Texas

What all are you growing this year?!

Big Zac
Jetsonic
Champion 11
Goliath
Green Sausage
Green Zebra
Oxheart Red
Black From Tula

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applestar
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Location: Zone 6, NJ (3/M)4/E ~ 10/M

Wow! Some of you must have a huge garden! :shock:
How many plants to you plant, how much do you harvest, and what do you do with them all? 8)

elevenplants
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Location: alabama

Last year I had 13 plants either in the ground or containers. Doesn't take up that much room, surprisingly. I just had them stuck here and there. This year, in a new locale, I have one bed prepared specifically for about 8 plants, and planters and containers for the rest. I hope to plant at least 15. I am usually blessed in the growing of tomatoes, harvesting enough to sauce, freeze, dry and otherwise preserve, and still have plenty to give away.

I'm also a pepper grower, and already have several sweet peppers and jalapenos in containers inside, and lots more to plant out when the time is right. I have had very good luck with pepper from seed. We even planted seed from one unidentified delicious pepper that we bought at a local tienda, and doggone if they didn't come up! 'Bout an inch and a half high and heading skyward. :o

Rebecca

Burner
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Wow. I feel so inadequate. :shock:

I was just going to go to Wal-Mart and pick up a Celebrity, a Beefsteak, and whatever cherry tomato was available. I already have an upside down hanging tomato plant going, but I can't remember the particular variety.

You guys have got me thinking about going with something kind of fancy.

Here's my bottom line with tomatoes: slice, salt, pepper, eat. Can anyone recommend a fantastic tasting slicer?

elevenplants
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Location: alabama

Here are three:

Brandywine
Beefsteak
Genovese Costoluto

Good luck!

Rebecca

damethod
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Joined: Mon May 05, 2008 4:15 pm
Location: Miami, FL

Two good slicing tomatoes I've tried recently:

Brandywine
Box Car Willie

Burner
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Location: Cottonwood, AZ

Thanks for the replies.
I was doing a little research today, and a Brandywine is defitely going to be added to my garden. Thanks again.

Burner
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Location: Cottonwood, AZ

So...my "upgraded" tomato garden this year:

HL Red Beefsteak
HL Pink Brandywine
HL Soldacki
HL Black Krim
Hybrid Celebrity
Hybrid Sweet 100 Cherry
Mr. Stripey

elevenplants
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Location: alabama

Mmmmm! Sounds great, Burner! Let us know how the Mr. Stripey turns out. I grew those a couple of years ago here in zone 7a, and was disappointed in their yield, although the few I did get were wonderful flavor. Only had one plant. Next time I try them will probably do 3-4 plants for a decent yield. IF I ever try them again....there are soooo many varieties, I might not ever get back to them! :lol:

Rebecca

Burner
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Rebecca, my kids picked out Mr. Stripey. I saw the picture of it and told them "No." and then finally thought, what the heck, why not. I'll post the outcome here. :D

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tomatodude
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Joined: Sat Mar 21, 2009 8:57 pm
Location: Texas

This year I'm growing the work horses, along with some new heirlooms.
Work Horses are...
Rutger (heirloom)
Celebrity
1) BHN 444
2) BHN 589
3) BHN 640
4) Black Krim x2
5) Brandywine Sudduth*
6) Carbon
7) Costoluto Genovese x2
8) German Red Strawberry
9) Giant Belgium
10) KBX* x2
11) Husky Red Cherry
12) Kellogg's Breakfast
13) Neves Azorean Red
14) Olena Ukrainian
15) Opalka x2
16) San Marzano*
17) Stump of the World

Squash

1) Golden Zucchini x4
2) Straighneck (yellow)x4
3) White Bush Vegetable Marrow (white) x4

Cucumber

Glorie de Paris x6
Burpee Hybrid
Lemon
Poinset 76

Looks to be a busy gardening season.

here's some pics...of this years garden..

[img]https://i56.photobucket.com/albums/g187/atascosa_tx/gardenpermulch.jpg[/img]

[img]https://i56.photobucket.com/albums/g187/atascosa_tx/raisedrows2.jpg[/img]

and my tx tiller

[img]https://i56.photobucket.com/albums/g187/atascosa_tx/Jdeere.jpg[/img]

I ran out of Coastal mulch....so I'll finish that on next Saturday..
Remember...Mulch is important to regulate moisture,,,the thicker the better,,,I use at least 5 inches
It's not what you Grow, it's How you grow it.

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tomatodude
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Have to clarify...
my work horses are the BHN 444, 589, and 640's
along with the celebrity toms and Husky red cherry..
It's not what you Grow, it's How you grow it.

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Earl K
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Location: Melbourne ,Fl.

what im growing

this is my first time growing.my girl did 2 yrs. ago but i didnt get into it. i picked out the plants this time and theyre mine now! limited on space,so all in 5 gal. buckets i have-1 sweet 100-1 better boy -1 patio tomato,2 anehiem-1 giant marconi-1 jalepeno peppers,2 zucchini & 1 sequoia strawberry.all on the pool deck.already have fruit on all except zucchini &strawberry.happy gardening :D

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tomatodude
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Glad to see that everyone has the "growing bug" this year!
Earl, once you start growing, you're gonna get hooked...oh and give those
zucchini squash a wide spacing, they can easily grow 3 foot wide or better.
Happy Gardening
It's not what you Grow, it's How you grow it.

ManokAnak
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Joined: Wed Mar 25, 2009 5:39 am
Location: Chicago

San Marzano this year again. All the plants I grew were the size of bushes and had so many tomatoes we just finished all the sauce we made with them last month.

Unfortunatly i do not have much growing space and hope to do Costoluto Genovese next year also. I am a sucker for any variety with Genovese in the name.

I am very excited for tomato harvest and nothing is even in the ground yet.

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hendi_alex
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Location: Central Sand Hills South Carolina

I'm going to have to try 'black krim'. The variety keeps popping up all over the place as folks talk about their favorite tomato varieties.
Eclectic gardening style, drawing from 45 years of interest and experience. Mostly plant in raised beds and containers primarily using intensive gardening techniques.
Alex

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