Zaccon
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Plant Material Around Paver Basketball Court

We have just installed a backyard paver stone basketball court. I'd love some suggestions as to what plant material I should use that would be hearty enough to withstand some possible foot traffic and bouncing balls? We are in a Zone 4 climate and the court is in full sun. Thank you!

grandpasrose
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What size of plants are thinking? Do you want groundcover, or shrubs?
How large is the space you are filling?
Just a little more info about what you are looking for would help. :wink:
VAL (Grandpa's Rose)
VAL (Grandpa's Rose)

Zaccon
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I'm not sure if I should do a hedge or groundcover or ornamental grass, etc. The amount of space to cover is quite large -- it is the perimeter of a kidney shaped patio - which slopes down around the edge into our yard.

The Helpful Gardener
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Foot traffic means groundcover, and to me, groundcover means Jeepers Creepers. Check out the site and look for high traffic plants; I LOVE Leptinella 'Platt's Black' and you can drive on it, for crying out loud! Neat plant from NZ!

[url]https://jeeperscreepers.info/[/url]

Scott

about ivy

ivy!!!it always works well and is very hardy.(and hard to get rid of!

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Grey
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What's with the goofy face? I don't get it.

Anyway - yes ivy is hardy and covers anything. I'm not very familiar with zone 4 plants, but your local nursery can probably give you some great suggestions. We have a few folks on this forum (including Scott, who already responded) who can probably help you. :)

Cool plant, Scott! Never seen that before, but wow!
Last edited by Grey on Thu Dec 08, 2005 2:59 pm, edited 1 time in total.

The Helpful Gardener
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Hold the Ivy! (invasive)

Hold the faces! (Disturbing!)

Scott

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Grey
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Hey Scott - thought the ivy might be okay since it sounds like it is paved all around the area - didn't think it would have a chance to be invasive there?

Oh and you haven't seen disturbing until you have seen The Studbaby.

The Helpful Gardener
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As soon as it fruits the European birds (and we have plenty of them) eat it and move it around, over wood and dale. Just shouldn't use that plant outdoors anymore. Lot's of other good plants like that Leptinella, Thymus, Sagina, Isotoma (also known as Laurentia), Sedums, Delosperma...I could go on and on here, without using one invasive, so why would I? Plus every one of the ones I just named has a flower feature too, so ivy is looking lamer and lamer...

HG

Scott

more ivy

ivy is only invasive when you don't train it and tend to it.

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Grey
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The Helpful Gardener wrote:As soon as it fruits the European birds (and we have plenty of them) eat it and move it around, over wood and dale. Just shouldn't use that plant outdoors anymore. Lot's of other good plants like that Leptinella, Thymus, Sagina, Isotoma (also known as Laurentia), Sedums, Delosperma...I could go on and on here, without using one invasive, so why would I? Plus every one of the ones I just named has a flower feature too, so ivy is looking lamer and lamer...

HG

Scott
Agreed. I actually didn't know English Ivy was on the Invasives list - I knew it had invasive tendencies, but didn't realize birds spread it.

Something with flowers = much better.

The Helpful Gardener
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T_D, that's everyones intent; "Oh it will be o.k because I will take much better care of it than everyone else." Then you go on vacation, or get sick, or sell the property and BOOM! An explosion...

It is the considered opinion of the Helpful Gardener that any plant displaying ANY tendencies toward bird born proliferaiton should be illegalized. Period. If you choose to garden with these plants on your own, so be it; I am not now, nor will I ever be, the garden police. But look at New Hampshire and Massachussets; they ARE illegalizing noxious weeds and are putting laws in place to prosecute propagation and dissemination, and I am one of the very few nursery people who welcome it.

I did not join this industry to become a polluter, but that's what many growers are becoming, and it is an even more dangerous form of pollution than an open pipe or buried drums. Those do not reproduce exponentially, ad perpetua, and do not limit beneficial species from populating the area. Finally it is very dangerous because the public perception is the same as yours; they don't hurt you directly and you can't SEE a problem. Talk to some scientists who work in these fields as I have and see how alarmed they are and you may begin to change your mind. The rainforest isn't the only place losing species daily...

Scott

Anonymous

does ivy kill animals? is that wut your saying, and some states have outlawed the use of ivy?wow! i have never heard of such a thing!!!

The Helpful Gardener
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Not directly, but most insects can't feed on non-native plants, so when a non-native takes over an area, the native plants get choked out, and insects lose a food source. Less insects means less food for birds and animals; less birds means less native plants because of less seeds being disributed (and the insects that pollinated them are not there to do that). Less plants means more space for invasives...it's a self perpetuating loop that grows more pronounced as we go. There are some scientists talking about the "slippery slope" hypothesis, that we have already started to lose the battle to the point of no return, but I am far more optimistic than that. Still something needs doing NOW, and continual use of habitat degrading plants needs to start with you, the home gardener. Spread the word...

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