S.p.smith
Newly Registered
Posts: 4
Joined: Sat Jul 23, 2016 3:40 pm

Low Budget Way to Reinvigorate a Patio Area?

So we bought a new house with a garden in need of lots of tlc.

The big tree needs to go, the shed and fence replaced and Palm cut back....

But thoughts please on a low budget way to reinvigorate the patio area.
The house has no direct access to the garden only through the property,
So is it a case of putting in decking, reslabbing?

Ideas please on a budget solution that will provide lasting garden pleasure.

Thanks in advance
Attachments
Lots of work needed
Lots of work needed

User avatar
webmaster
Site Admin
Posts: 9085
Joined: Sun Feb 08, 2004 5:59 pm
Location: Amherst, MA USDA Zone 5a

Re: Low Budget Way to Reinvigorate a Patio Area?

What kinds of activities would you like to enjoy on the patio? A relaxing spot to enjoy a quiet breakfast or outdoor dinner? Is a grill or bbq out of the question? I think the best place to start is sketching out what you'd like to be doing in the patio space.

S.p.smith
Newly Registered
Posts: 4
Joined: Sat Jul 23, 2016 3:40 pm

Re: Low Budget Way to Reinvigorate a Patio Area?

Hello webby.
Thanks for the reply. Short answer is a bit of all of those. Somewhere quiet to sit in the sun, have a bbq when the weather's nice etc.
As you can see many of the existing slabs are broken and have subsided.
The biggest issues to me are having to transport materials through the house as there's no way to get a mixer or wheelbarrow through this seems to me to make putting new slabs in problematic.

User avatar
applestar
Mod
Posts: 27485
Joined: Thu May 01, 2008 11:21 pm
Location: Zone 6, NJ (3/M)4/E ~ 10/M

Re: Low Budget Way to Reinvigorate a Patio Area?

More than that, how are you going to replace the shed and fence?? Through the house?

When they are taken down, THEN will you have access? Because if you do, then that would be the ideal time to do major work.

Otherwise, I think first order of business is to clear away and clean up as much as you can to really see what needs to be done to make it an inviting space -- maybe once the vines are cleared away from the shed, a coat of paint will make the shed look better for now. Likewise the fence -- a little repair and stain?

I could also see just lifting all the pavers, re-grading and leveling with some sand or underlayment, then laying the pavers back down. (You might be able to power wash or sand blast them too, though not sure if that's feasible in the small space -- may have to go with elbow grease and stiff brush)

All the plant matter could be chopped up as mulch or stuffed into the compost bin -- that's what that black thing is, isn't it? _- without having to remove them OR bringing in bagged mulch through the house... And later on, the compost can be used for planting -- making this space as self sustaining as possible.
Learning never ends because we can share what we've learned. And in sharing our collective experiences, we gain deeper understanding of what we learned.

User avatar
rainbowgardener
Super Green Thumb
Posts: 25303
Joined: Sun Feb 15, 2009 11:04 pm
Location: TN/GA 7b

Re: Low Budget Way to Reinvigorate a Patio Area?

Yup, to start with you need to get it all cleared away, de-junked, cut everything back and see what you have. If you can do without the shed (do you have any other storage area?), I'd get rid of it. It will open up the space a lot. I like applestar's idea of just lifting the pavers, regrading (put down new paver sand) and re-using. You can get concrete stain for them to give them a color lift. It is like thin paint so it soaks in a bit, but it still has to be redone every year or two. My previous house had grey concrete patio which I stained terra cotta:
patio.jpg
On the right side of that patio, the strip of green was a bench the whole length for additional seating. There's a trellis behind the bench and then a raised bed on the other side.

Since your space is very narrow, you want to avoid just putting stuff, plantings or whatever, down the sides. You want to put something across the back, once it is all cleared away and opened up.

Could be a wall with fountain, preferably a little less busy than this one:
Image

or a smaller scale version of seating area:
Image

Image

It could be a really pretty space!
Twitter account I manage for local Sierra Club: https://twitter.com/CherokeeGroupSC Facebook page I manage for them: https://www.facebook.com/groups/65310596576/ Come and find me and lots of great information, inspiration

S.p.smith
Newly Registered
Posts: 4
Joined: Sat Jul 23, 2016 3:40 pm

Re: Low Budget Way to Reinvigorate a Patio Area?

To Apple star, unfortunately that still doesn't provide access unless through other people's gardens as we are surrounded on all sides.

To everyone.. some great ideas, the shed is a complete wreck, all that ivy has ripped the roof apart and the wood is completely rotten

S.p.smith
Newly Registered
Posts: 4
Joined: Sat Jul 23, 2016 3:40 pm

Re: Low Budget Way to Reinvigorate a Patio Area?

image.jpeg
Clearance work done (next door not willing to pay for their "fence" such as it is.... So will have to put the new fence beside it. Tree coming down this week then new fence

imafan26
Mod
Posts: 11119
Joined: Tue Jan 01, 2013 1:32 pm
Location: hawaii, zone 12a 587 ft elev.

Re: Low Budget Way to Reinvigorate a Patio Area?

How big is this space?
I think start with clearing out what you are not keeping first. Make a plan for what you can do with it.

The pavers will be a lot of work but you may be able to repair the uneven parts if this is a dry laid path.

What kind of fence are you putting in. A solid fence will block light and air. A slatted fence will allow air and some light in. A chain link or wrought iron fence offers less privacy but will let the most air and light in. A chain link fence will be the cheapest to put up and offers possibilitiies for traingin some edibles like peas, beans, squash, cucumber or an ornamental vine like clematis or a climbing rose. I prefer the edibles mainly because they are temporary although some of the squash and beens can get very long they are annuals and only live a short time so the vines won't eat up the garden permanently. The planting strip is narrow but since vines go up some low flowers or herbs and vegetables like lettuce and Asian greens would grow 6-18 inches tall. Some herbs and vegetables can be interplanted among flowers so they look more ornamental but are also practical. Some even have edible and ornamental flowers
https://content.ces.ncsu.edu/choosing-a ... ers-ag-790



I would actually think about rebuiliding the shed for storage. You can add a little porch on it for a sitting area. Maybe with a swing or hammock. and a table. you can hang lanterns from the porch ceiling for lights at night.

http://www.familyhandyman.com/sheds/how ... h/view-all

You can use a regtractable clothesline that won't be in the way when you want to use the yard or you can hang the clothesline in the shed but furniture would have to be collapsible like folding chairs and tables that you can keep in storage. I would not put in the side window if there isn't a view.

On the other side I would do tier plantings. In the back something tall and long blooming like hollyhocks or some foundation shrubs like Dee Runk boxwoods that grow tall and narrow. Hinoki false cypress (Chamaecyparis obtusa) is one of the most versatile and durable plant choices. Most cultivars grow slowly into irregular pyramids that need little to no pruning. (Zone 5). They would still need some maintenance. In front of that I would do annuals. Similar to the plan below. As long as you select plants about the same height you can substitute different plants or a different complementary color scheme.
Layer the plants and repeat. For the best effects it is better to mass plants in groups of three or more rather than one plant at a time. It stands out better and is more cohesive. Dividing the groups and planting on both ends makes it look more cohesive and balanced. Leave texture and shape also add interest. Thinks like spikey ornamental grasses can contrast with soft underplantings. White and dark purple go with almost anything. Choose plants with long bloom times or plants that bloom in different seasons if you are using perennials.
Annuals complete their cycle in a year or less. Sometimes as little as 50 days. They grow bloom and die. They need to be replanted. Most of the summer annuals, and vegetables are like this.
Perennials can live a year or more. Some are shortlived and grow the first year and bloom the next and then die. Perennials usually have seasons of bloom and most do not bloom year round.

Before you put in the plants you need to amend the soil with compost and fertilizer. And continue to add compost and some fertilizer every time you plant. Mulching will keep weeds down. Measure the space and do your research. Space plants according to their mature size. It will look bare in the beginning; mulch will help. You will save money if you follow a plan and don't have to pull out the extra plants later.
http://www.bhg.com/gardening/plans/easy ... an/#page=0
Happy gardening in Hawaii. Gardens are where people grow.

Return to “Landscaping”