Davyd
Full Member
Posts: 20
Joined: Tue May 03, 2005 1:50 am
Location: UES (Z=5b/LF=lMY)

Border plants

We've got a very long tree patch at the back border of our front yard facing west. I just spent this weekend thrashing it up as it were to prepare it for... well, SOMETHING better than what it looks like. I'm taking trees out (adolescents and less, we're talking it would be a giant trunk if something wasn't done!) and fighting a grueling battle with honeysuckle, but seem to be coming out on top.

Now, there will obviously be trees remaining and they should provide ample cover for the better part of the day for the front cover area (reminder - it faces west so the sun only gets to it later). I'd say about 5-7 hours of direct sunlight in the later portion of the day (mid-spring to mid-fall). To my main question though; this IS a long tract, about 80' or more. Not much depth, but very long. Before anyone can crack the inevitable 'spaghetti plant' joke, is there anything i can plant in spaces that would survive the area and spread of it's own accord? Flowering, preferable. I've seen a brochure on the Wave Spreading Petunias and they look like they could do a good job with a good look, but they seem to require more sun than they're going to get.

Or am i off? Any other ideas?
Hardiness/Heat= 5b Last Frost= latMay

The Helpful Gardener
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Posts: 7493
Joined: Tue Feb 10, 2004 2:17 am
Location: Colchester, CT

Well you chose an annual that would need replacing every year; seems like a lot of work.

Shade groundcovers are plentiful, but are often invasives. As I have no idea where you live I will not recommend one, but suggest that general tack as a good one to start looking at...

Davyd
Full Member
Posts: 20
Joined: Tue May 03, 2005 1:50 am
Location: UES (Z=5b/LF=lMY)

They're annuals? :shock: Not that I'm totally ignorant (i know i've heard Petunias are annuals), i just thought that how i've seen them grow the patches were from a multi-years' worth of growth. I suppose that they grow extremely fast then? Or you just get massive amounts to make a large patch?

Excuse the lack of area. I always use the airport codes and forget some people don't know them. It's Greensboro, NC. Zone 7a/b.

I haven't actually picked out the plants and gone ahead, i've just preselected what to get. I haven't really finished prepping the spot yet. Just wanted some ideas on some good colorful ground cover that could stand the shade and area where i plan on inserting them. And i figured that an annual might be best anyway, at least for the first year to see how it would go for later crops.
Hardiness/Heat= 5b Last Frost= latMay

The Helpful Gardener
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Posts: 7493
Joined: Tue Feb 10, 2004 2:17 am
Location: Colchester, CT

I would look at a true geranium by the name of 'Rosanne' . Reliable, non-invasive, not too tall, and with a May to October bloom time. Quickly becoming a favorite of the design/install crowd because of the negligible maintenance...

Davyd
Full Member
Posts: 20
Joined: Tue May 03, 2005 1:50 am
Location: UES (Z=5b/LF=lMY)

Perennial/Annual?

Colors? (as in, what colors does it come in) Not that it really matters, but we're trying to go away from yellows - our primary garden has a predominant yellow 'flavor' to it.
Hardiness/Heat= 5b Last Frost= latMay

Davyd
Full Member
Posts: 20
Joined: Tue May 03, 2005 1:50 am
Location: UES (Z=5b/LF=lMY)

Excuse. :oops: Think i knew they were perennials. But was just wondering how they weathered seasons. Just did a quick Net-wide search to get some info. Looks like they're usually a pretty blue, and spread quite nicely. Thanx for the idea. Now if i can just find some for sale.
Hardiness/Heat= 5b Last Frost= latMay

The Helpful Gardener
Mod
Posts: 7493
Joined: Tue Feb 10, 2004 2:17 am
Location: Colchester, CT

Shouldn't be a problem; this is a trade standard already...

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