eyecandiuk
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All Concrete

Guys im hoping you can help
i have just purchased a terraced property which has a garden which is just concrete at varying levels and slops away from the property some of which is broken up... can i put topsoil on top to level off the garden and then lay lawn on top?

Cheers

Dave

opabinia51
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If you are talking about putting topsoil on top of the concrete, yes you can but, what would be better would be to lay down some cardboard or black and white newspaper then a layer of vegetable matter followed by a layer of leaves and finally your topsoil. This will ensure that your soil will be good and rich and that your lawn will be healthy.

Don't use newsprint with colour articles in it as the inks have dioxins and other nasty chemicals that are unhealthy for plants.

The Helpful Gardener
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It's doable, especially the way Opa has listed. Grass needs very little soil (2" or so) to grow.

Any exposed concrete would heat and transfer, so you couldn't bring lawn to the edge (or shorter) of a concrete slab, or the slab would bottom heat the grass roots and dry them; certain death...

Guest

Growing Grass over Concrete

Intriguing concept! This just might work for a troublesome area I have. Some questions to pose. When I picture a terraced garden I think of Paul Bunyan giant steps up a steep slope or a terraced vineyard planted on a hillside. Each step is level with the top of its wall and, as I assume from this post, covered over with concrete. The concrete is sloped and broken in some spots.

What holds the soil in place if it rests on a sloped piece of concrete level with the top of the terrace? It seems rain, wind and vibration from walking would cause it to move around? All three of which I have in abundance! How high would the finished combined layers be? Would it not become to compacted at some point to support plant growth?

The other suggestion made for my area was gravel gardening. Another concept I am unfamiliar with but seems to be successfull and popular in England.

eyecandiuk
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Joined: Fri Apr 29, 2005 9:03 am

Smash the blighters!!!!

Thanks chaps'

would it help if i smashed that concrete up to allow for drainage?
Also to stop movement from the soil on the edges of my garden where i have a fence would i be best to enclose the soil using railway sleepers also giving me a border as it may be also
Also at its deepest point the soil maybe up to up about a foot deep. At its lowest point it will be about 6 - 10 inches.


Cheers Guys

The Helpful Gardener
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Both breaking up the concrete and the railway ties are excellent ideas. The soil depth is more than sufficient...

eyecandiuk
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as with regards to the cardboard would i also be wise to maybe thow down some of that bark chippings stuff before i put down my top soilll
top soil is £78 for 1.3 tons so i may also be able to save some money there by putting a ton of that down if it helps the soil

The Helpful Gardener
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And it would help drainage some as well, but add too much and when it breaks down it gets very fine and clogs, getting waterlogged (noit much of a threat to lawn, but can create drainage issues). Not too much mind you, but some is o.k....

opabinia51
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As far as the soil being blown away by wind: It is a possibility but, if the soil is rich in humus and other organic matter, the matrices formed within the soil should be sufficient to hold it in one place even in high wind or a lot of rain.
Of course, breaking up the concrete would be best but, given that most people want the least amount of work as possible... just putting the soil on the concrete should be fine. 8)

The Helpful Gardener
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Opa's the soil doc around these parts; if he says right, it's right...

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