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Location: Hurry-Cane, Florida USDA10/SZ25

External Exposure - blocking unwanted chemicals

So I'm going raised garden for a number of reasons - a small side benefit is I don't get neighbor's lawn chemicals in the garden (did raised beds before). It's more for other reasons, but that's a benefit.

However, I'm seeing notices in the paper that there is going to be mosquito spraying. Ideas for blocking that (and overspray from the back neighbor to whatever he does to his trees?).

The way I'm setting things up I can tent it at short notice, but with what and when? Weed block? Fine net? Clear plastic (not too worried about heat)?

Or are general mosquito sprays not enough to worry about (assuming they only do it every other month and I wash my veggies and fruits?)

Looked up our extension office and county mosquito control; they use a combo of things (larval control (hormones and bacterial), chemical treatment and "other" biological controls.

Thoughts? Am I overworried? We have a lot of agriculture in the area but more than a mile away and a lot of it is in huge scale greenhouses.
USDA Zone 10, Sunset Zone 25, 16 feet above sea level, surrounded by chem-turfers.

CharlieBear
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Location: Pacific NW

I personally wouldn't worry about spraying for misquitos especially early in the growing season, by law they have to break down fast anymore and I am an organic nut but also trained as an environmental engineer. As for sprays for fruit trees, find out what is being used, many of them are organic and not a danger to you at all, lawn chemicals now that is another issue all together. Also unless it is a very windy day you shouldn't end up with any fruit spray unless it is from a plane or something. Sprays are expensive and most home growers tend to use them so they get the most bang for the buck and have to mix as little a possible. I spray my fruit trees but with organically sound mixes.

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Thanks. Makes sense ; but I don't know the industry here.

Lawn Chems are an issue; is there a way I can test flow through water? I'd like to plant fruiting berry bushes eventually.
USDA Zone 10, Sunset Zone 25, 16 feet above sea level, surrounded by chem-turfers.

CharlieBear
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It is possible, but generally too expensive for the home gardener to consider it. For one thing assume that their is too much nitrogen all grass fertilizers are too high in nitrogen, some have either p and or K as well, but without reading what the bags say, it is only a guess. As for the weed part, probably cassaron, not a very nice player from our organic view. The key is whether your neighbor is conservative (cheap) and therefore keeps it all to a minimum or not. If the grass is excessively green, like a golf course then you will no doubt have a problem.

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What I can see from my second story (6 foot fence and a 5 foot gardener) it's pretty green. No idea what they use aside from dog poop (if the dog is still there, not sure).

If I'd thought about it earlier in the year I would have taken more care of the front porch tomatoes and brought over some tomatoes on Halloween when the kids do trick or treating ...

Well, I think i'll stick with containers off of the ground and plant the in-ground stuff on the other side of the A/C pad (presuming the water flow goes around it) and in the front yard. Just bought a blueberry bush and am stalking the pitiful displays at the big box stores for artichoke plants.
USDA Zone 10, Sunset Zone 25, 16 feet above sea level, surrounded by chem-turfers.

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