RyNJ
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Location: West Central NJ, Zone 6B

I'm flooded, and I don't know what I should/can do

I. HATE. RAIN. I don't hate watering, but at this point I hate rain. 2 Weeks of almost constant rain before Irene, then Irene, 3 days of sun, and now at least a foot of rain from Lee (I don't know what kinds of lies the weather authorities are trying to pass off about 6", but from the way some buckets I left out filled, we got WAY ore than that). And they're now saying that Maria or Katia might come this way too.

I had almost fought the powdery mildew off my zukes during those 3 sunny days, but now it's back with a vengeance. Septoria absolutely covering my tomatoes. I've removed the badly-affected branches, but I don't feel I can safely remove any more, but I don't know what else I can do. And the rain was pulverizing my mustard seedlings, so I put on some row covers, but even with them open to allow a good amount of air flow, I'm worried those are gonna succumb to some fungus. Flooded cabbage bed.

I tried out digging some pits to give the water somewhere to go to, but they just filled up with the water from the saturated ground around them. TOO much water and NOWHERE for it to go!

Is anyone else having similar problems? Could I put a thousand shamwows all over and just wring them out somewhere else every few hours? :lol: I need some kind of magically absorbant material to surround my plants with.

PS. I have to say that I'm still extremely thankful that only my garden is flooding. Some of the damage going on around me is unbelievable. My prayers are with you if you've been hit bad.

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applestar
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Location: Zone 6, NJ (3/M)4/E ~ 10/M

Ouch. Yesterday, we drove along 195 through patchs of VERY HEAVY rain -- one minute the pavement was dry, the next minute a dilute that the fastest windshield wiper setting couldn't keep up with!

Considering the DRY DRY spring (at least for us around here) it's almost unreal -- even my garden got rained on and the rainclouds typically by-pass us.

I'm thinking this is a horrible time of the year to get overmuch rain -- not sure how the grapes and grains are going to do, and some pumpkins, etc maybe threatening to burst, not to mention home-grown tomatoes.

If the ground is already saturated and there is no slope/grade, there's not much more you can do I suppose -- if there is, then you can try to direct the water. Surrounding the beds with bales of hay or straw to soak up the water may or may not help (the thing is that the bales will get very moldy, which in itself it OK, they will rapidly decompose and be a great BROWN addition to the compost pile or for winterizing the garden later, but depending on what spores were on them to begin with, your current situation may be aggravated).

For next year, since you've found out that your garden sits a little low, you may want to make raised beds. You can surround the beds with supporting material if you wish, or you can just pile loose soil. Fall is the best time to prep since there will be plenty of organic matter to build your beds with like fall leaves and yard/garden waste (yep the stuff you make compost with) as well as hay and straw bales, stable sweepings, etc. (most farms will want to clean out in preparation for winter).

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Tilde
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Location: Hurry-Cane, Florida USDA10/SZ25

What about hay bales with some plastic sheeting on the garden side, and dig a channel away?

I'm sorry about the damage to your garden (and everything else, I know some people think it's weird to be upset when people are losing houses and lives). :(
USDA Zone 10, Sunset Zone 25, 16 feet above sea level, surrounded by chem-turfers.

RyNJ
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Joined: Fri Jul 29, 2011 1:48 am
Location: West Central NJ, Zone 6B

Thank you for the suggestions, guys!

Honestly, I shouldn't be worried about potentially bringing more fungus in on hay bales. I've got more than enough as it is. Urg. I'm probably gonna try more channeling when I can and see if I can get some drainage going on.

I HAD some nice, smooth, uncracked brandywines almost ready to take inside, and now I have some split, under ripe brandywines that are probably gonna mold up before the other half ripens :( If I did have pumpkins I'd probably be losing my s***. All of it of course has to happen right as I'm starting school again.

I was about to put in some kale and hardy spinach, too, but now I'm worried about them getting drowned out. But I don't want it to get to be too late. Should I put those seeds in?

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soil
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and here i am with not a single drop since may, i hate watering. i really really hate watering.

sorry for your garden.
For all things come from earth, and all things end by becoming earth.

greenstubbs
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Location: N. Nevada

soil wrote:and here i am with not a single drop since may, i hate watering. i really really hate watering.

sorry for your garden.
You too? Guess maybe they should move to a dryer state than Ca. We have enough as it is!

Nature's Babe
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Location: East Sussex

We have had extremes of weather too, deluge and drought. I found Emelia Hazlips method works well for both deluge and drought. dig the topsoil from the paths to raise the beds, then mulch two or three inches on the beds with straw, spent crops and dried seed free weeds. Water will settle in the paths and the mulch prevents erosion from the rain, encourages worms near the surface which open drainage channels. In drought the mulch will slow evaporation and conserve water so you will not need to water so frequently.
just plant your seedlings through the mulch.
Sit down before a fact as a little child, be prepared to give up every preconcieved notion, follow humbly wherever and to whatever abyss nature leads, or you shall learn nothing.
By Thomas Huxley

DoubleDogFarm
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Nature's Babe wrote:We have had extremes of weather too, deluge and drought. I found Emelia Hazlips method works well for both deluge and drought. dig the topsoil from the paths to raise the beds, then mulch two or three inches on the beds with straw, spent crops and dried seed free weeds. Water will settle in the paths and the mulch prevents erosion from the rain, encourages worms near the surface which open drainage channels. In drought the mulch will slow evaporation and conserve water so you will not need to water so frequently.
just plant your seedlings through the mulch.
I really like this idea. Now where have I seen this method, seem so familiar I can almost smell it.

Double Dog Farm 2011
[img]https://i67.photobucket.com/albums/h300/eric_wa/Double%20Dog%20Farm%20Vegetable%20Garden%20plants/GarlicSheetmulch004.jpg[/img]
[img]https://i67.photobucket.com/albums/h300/eric_wa/Double%20Dog%20Farm%20Vegetable%20Garden%20plants/GarlicSheetmulch005.jpg[/img]
[img]https://i67.photobucket.com/albums/h300/eric_wa/Double%20Dog%20Farm%20Vegetable%20Garden%20plants/BCSTractor.jpg[/img]

Many more pictures if you would like to rummage.
[url=https://s67.photobucket.com/albums/h300/eric_wa/Double%20Dog%20Farm%20Vegetable%20Garden%20plants/#!cpZZ1QQtppZZ16]Albums to browse[/url]

Eric

Nature's Babe
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Location: East Sussex

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ugFd1JdFaE0 :D

her beds are about knee high, gosh you must be really flooded if its above that?
Sit down before a fact as a little child, be prepared to give up every preconcieved notion, follow humbly wherever and to whatever abyss nature leads, or you shall learn nothing.
By Thomas Huxley

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Gary350
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Location: TN. 50 years of gardening experience.

Nice thing about too much water you can look and see where the water is, where the high places are in the yard, and what to do about it. I had 2" of water standing in my garden for 6 days and 9" or rain. The soil is very soft now so that make it easy to dig a ditch with a shovel 200 ft to the street. I am going to put a 3" drainage pipe in the ditch then cover it up. I am going to dig a drainage hole in the back of he yard for all the water to go into the pipe.

My driveway had 2" of water standing in it too in some places so I need drainage for that too.

I will be prepaired for the next big rain.

RyNJ
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Joined: Fri Jul 29, 2011 1:48 am
Location: West Central NJ, Zone 6B

That definitely is the good thing that came of this, I now know what areas need the extra height. I'm raising the beds as much as I can for the last few things I'm going to plant (which are garlic, spinach, and kale). I'd be down to rock if I went as deep as Hazelip goes, but a few more inches should really help out! :)

Nature's Babe
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You could add a mulch of compost or well rotted manure on top later as beds will settle a little. :)
Sit down before a fact as a little child, be prepared to give up every preconcieved notion, follow humbly wherever and to whatever abyss nature leads, or you shall learn nothing.
By Thomas Huxley

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