ruggr10
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Location: Brunswick, Maine

different mulch???

Living here on the coast, we have lots of access to seaweed and eel grass. How about those as a mulch for veggies and strawberries? I met a local woman who uses the eel grass. It dries nicely and doesn't smell as bad as regular seaweed.

Whatcha think????

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Sage Hermit
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Location: Finlaysen, MN Coniferous Forest

What ever is in sea weed will be in your plants over time. It can help balance your ecosystem. I ate some the other day. Not so tasty but good for you. 8)
You can solve all your problems in a garden/laboratory.

lifegrower
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Location: Dennisport, MA

Any sort of seaweed is so rich in nutrients that you're lucky to have it. And it doesn't contain enough residual salt to matter a bit. The only downside is that it takes a long time to break down. Rugged stuff, but wonderful.

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applestar
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I don'have access to such riches, but it seems to me that seaweed would be a great compost ingredient. As mulch, wouldn't it become matted and stinky? Maybe the eelgrass would have a better structure.

I think I BUY seaweed (or at least kelp) dried and ground up and called "kelp meal" as fertilizer. Maybe that's your answer --dry and crumble on the driveway first. But I only use a handful at a time -- mulch maybe overkill.

Do you also have access to something called "salt marsh hay"? I've read about them as excellent weed-free hay, great for mulch. Combining the crumbled seaweed with other dry mulch matter before using seems like a good idea to me.

lifegrower
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Actually it doesn't get matted or stinky at all. I've used it for years. And yes it composts well. The only problem with it as mulch is that it will clog up the tines on your tiller, if you till at all. Salt marsh hay is also great because it grows in brackish conditions and won't come back as weeds in your garden -- but it can be a pain to get to and cut.

ruggr10
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Joined: Sun Dec 26, 2010 2:53 pm
Location: Brunswick, Maine

Salt marsh hay is a land plant so it is totally different from eel grass. I don't think I can get any of that unless I cut some along some the water. I'd be afraid on contributing to erosion.

Eel grass does get dry and crusty so I don't think it will clump. I am planning on drying some seaweed out on the driveway and then running my mulching lawnmower over it to add it to the compost pile. Last year I put in whole pieces and it didn't break down that well.

How about feeding seaweed to my red wigglers?



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