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sheeshshe
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Joined: Sun May 27, 2007 12:17 am
Location: maine

pruning... ahhh, pruning LOL! :) my local orchard here that we got the trees from recommended this site to me for pruning: https://www.gardening.cornell.edu/fruit/homefruit/3treefruit.pdf

I bet there are lots of different ways of pruning though!

CherA
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Posts: 42
Joined: Mon Aug 02, 2010 6:19 pm
Location: Chelsea-Revere-Everett

My fruit and ornamental peaches are all diseased fungi

Hi, I;m new and in New england. My fruit trees eg apple has its own fungus disease; I have forgotten the name of it but it is multicolored like yellow and red etc. the fungi that is...on the leaves.
The ornamental peaches are full of peach tree fungus..and are so high up to spray. How can I remain organic and help these trees get rid of the fungi?? I also have it black and yellow fungi spots all over the roses for past few years. This yard is not the place for roses.
very lucky no swuash or vine veggies have it or at leastn ot yet. I have plenty of those tiny white whatchamacallits tho. I treat with soap and water but want to keep organic. Does this mean I am no longer truly organic? I have not had to use it on everything thank goodness.
But the Jap beetles ate every bit of mymini bok toy (choy) thatI grew for my parrots. I didn;t know what to do as birds can't handle additives...what should I do for next batch?
I know this was meant for fruit trees but fungus is on those and other things and teh Beetles are probably off topic so sorry. I will eventually find teh place t address that one. About the fruit trees, any help? Thanks Cher A
Cher Angelo; MLS,HS, ASCP, & CAS, cert ornith pending
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nullzero
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Posts: 3
Joined: Tue Jul 27, 2010 9:39 pm
Location: SoCal

I am growing about 30-40 fruit trees all in containers.

4 apple trees
2 mulberry trees
2 cherimoya trees
3 jujube trees
6 citrus trees
2 avocado trees
1 white sapote tree
1 mango tree
7 pomegranates (2 dwarfs)
1 persimmon
1 peach
1 loquat
2 yellow strawberry guava trees

A few other trees I can't recall at the moment. Its been a good learning experience. So far fruit production has been on the lower side (mainly due to age, most are 2-3 years old). My most productive fruit trees are the yellow strawberry guava trees, these will fruit most of the year with tasty fruit slightly smaller then ping pong balls. Another winner in the container setting is the Bonanza Peach (genetic dwarf).

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engineeredgarden
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Posts: 426
Joined: Thu May 13, 2010 3:51 pm
Location: NW Alabama

I have a backyard orchard myself, which consists of:

3 blueberry bushes
2 keifer pear trees
2 plum trees
2 apple trees
3 muscadine grape vines
1 fig tree

The plum curculio destroyed every single plum this year, and I sprayed dilligently

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Sage Hermit
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Posts: 532
Joined: Fri Mar 13, 2009 8:20 pm
Location: Finlaysen, MN Coniferous Forest

Plum trees

Mine did not produce fruit this year. :?: :?
You can solve all your problems in a garden/laboratory.

ronbre
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Posts: 91
Joined: Sun May 16, 2010 11:34 pm
Location: Michigan

I am growing tons of fruit and nut trees in my food forest gardens. I have 3 full size older apple trees that were grown from seed and they did quite well, i have 6 pear trees, about 10 dwarf apple trees including one pole variety of crab apple, I have 2 sour and 2 sweet cherries as well as ornamental and wild cherries, several peach and plum trees as well as a fruit cocktail tree, have lots of berries including mulberry and elderberry and others, and have a lot of baby nut trees, 3 kinds of walnuts, 6 hazelnuts, halls hardy almond, 2 hickories, 2 chestnuts, had pecans but they died here in the far north cold.

i also have just planted some service berries and mountain ash..I'm sure there are others that i forgot to mention
Brenda

Bloom where you are planted
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garden119
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Posts: 13
Joined: Sat Aug 14, 2010 12:34 am
Location: Ohio US

Im growing a pear tree and a peach tree and i want to add more I think maby a pawpaw if there self fertile and maby some other fruit berring tree

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Vorguen
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Posts: 191
Joined: Sat Jan 29, 2011 11:55 pm
Location: South Texas

soil wrote:i have 20 fruit trees in my forest garden. they are doing great this year with all the late rains.

if you are growing from seed, chances are you wont get the exact same pear as the one you ate, and the tree will become very huge ( not dwarfed) other than that good luck!

I have been very curious about how this works... is there any way you can help me understand?

I know how Hybridization works, and often the seeds are sterile, but I often wonder how you get a seed of a different fruit from another fruit etc...

my wife planted an orange tree ages ago, and everyone told her the oranges weren't going to be the same thing and that they would be bitter..

the tree grew to produce some of the sweetest oranges ever

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kimbledawn
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Posts: 225
Joined: Thu Jul 09, 2009 2:18 pm
Location: Memphis

We are just starting with trees. We have two apple, one peach, one plum. I have pawpaw seeds but I haven't started them yet. We also have two blueberry, two rasberry, two blackberry and I traded for a marionberry.
"Organic gardeners always know the best DIRT!"

tomc
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Posts: 2665
Joined: Sun Apr 10, 2011 6:52 am
Location: SE-OH USA Zone 6-A

applestar wrote:1 struggling PawPaw purchased as a seedling.
I like paw paw, an' fwiw too many dandy trees that are supposed to unsuited as bonsai come along just fine in tray culture. Except paw paw. :(

This ebony family tree has honkin big tender leaves, and ultra tender feet that will not tolerate root pruning. So I had'ta settle for them as landscape planting. Pick and prep your plant-out site carefuly. You will not be able to move it once planted.

Mine did overwinter fine in central NH. They are not self-fertile so like hazelnut, it takes two (or more) to tango. If you grow on Ohioan-clay they are indigenous here, but don't like standing water.

Pester me in the fall and If any of the current crop germinate I'll see about getting you a mate.
Think like a tree
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tomc
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Posts: 2665
Joined: Sun Apr 10, 2011 6:52 am
Location: SE-OH USA Zone 6-A

Vorguen wrote:I have been very curious about how this works... is there any way you can help me understand?

I know how Hybridization works, and often the seeds are sterile, but I often wonder how you get a seed of a different fruit from another fruit etc...

my wife planted an orange tree ages ago, and everyone told her the oranges weren't going to be the same thing and that they would be bitter..

the tree grew to produce some of the sweetest oranges ever
Germination issues:
Tree seed of temperate zone trees, if freshly planted have a fair to good germination rate. *If* you paint inside the lines woody plants demand. Mike Dirr in: Manual of Woody Landscape Plants has an elegant description of the inhibitors that keep tree seed germinating only at optimal times. Often this means a winters nap in the cold and thaw cycle of nature has to happen. Not a freezer or dried.

Cold stratification can be as elegant as in a cold frame in a germinating pan, or as low-tech as stuck inna pot of dirt and bermed into the garden with a plank on top till spring rolls back around.

Temperate zone tree seed is not a tomato seed that will spring to attention and grow as soon as heat, warmth, and moisture are supplied.

A minor number of Japan maple cultivar seed ARE sterile. Bloodgood (JM) seed is only sterile if you dry them... Even rugged crab apple seed will only tolerate a few months drying before seed is no longer viable.

Variability
*If* you demand fruit quality equal to, or better than the parent; then your odds may be as poor as 1 in 100 grown. If your making apple sauce, fruit leather, or cider, then just about any apple tree that makes fruit, will feed the posse at home. A few will seem exceptional to you and may become a tree you want to graft other examples of.

John Chapman made his living collecting pomace (the goo left over from cider) and planting out as a straight run every seedling it produced.

The funkiest feral pear will make a fruit, and if kept pruned can be hand collected. it may well be too grainy to be an exceptional dessert pear. it'll still cook out for pear butter fine.

I've had a southern arborist sneer at a stubby northern hearty pecan, he still jammed my pralines into his pie-hole fast enough with those 'inferior' nuts in it.

Pruning
This is more true of apple, prunus, and pear, but if I can keep a crab apple blooming and setting fruit at less than two feet tall, just how tall a standard tree on its own feet has to become is a lot less clear than some folks who sell trees on dwarfing rootstock might have you beleive.

As smarty-pants as this post sounds. An' I'll grant it does. I've grafted apple and not much else. I've listened to arborists who claim prunus and nut trees can be grafted. maybe their right, I dunno.

If there is a problem with growing your own fruit or nut trees out from seed it has more to do with the delay between generations. It is the only excuse I can find to justify using dwarf rootstocks, they come into production a few years faster than standard trees do. They die of old age sooner too.
Think like a tree
© 2016 Invisable Inc.

tomc
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Posts: 2665
Joined: Sun Apr 10, 2011 6:52 am
Location: SE-OH USA Zone 6-A

I'm bumping this back up to the top of the page. In hopes that voruen reads my last post.
Think like a tree
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ruggr10
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Posts: 352
Joined: Sun Dec 26, 2010 7:53 pm
Location: Brunswick, Maine

Planted last year.

Fruit Trees
1 Nectarine
2 Plums (Burbank and Santa Rosa)
1 Weeping Mulberry
1 Black Tartarian Cherry

Berries
9 Blueberries
2 Elderberries

This Year So Far
3 Beach Plums (Wild Goose, Dunbars, Bounty Canada)

On the Way
2 Apples (Candadian Strawberry, Frostbite)
4 Honeyberries
3 Aronia
1 Pink Blueberry (I love telling people this one)


Wanted
1 Peach
1 More dark cherry. My black tartarian is supposed to be self fertile but I don't trust that.
Hardy Kiwis

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