iskhan
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How to make organic NPK separately?

hi

As you know that some time any one of NPK is lacking for specific plant.
How to make organic NPK separately?
I mean organic Nitrogen , I mean organic Phosphorus ,I mean organic Potash. so if a plant have a deficiency of Potash we put only organic Potash.

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rainbowgardener
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Personally, I don't think gardening is about doing chemistry.

What we want is to create a rich, living soil which has not only all the nutrients plants need, but all the soil life that works with the plants to make those nutrients available to them.

Best way to do that is good homemade compost, made from tons of different ingredients (all the different vegetable scraps you eat, lots of different pulled weeds, plant wastes and clippings, grass clippings, leaves, etc). It will have all the different macro and micro nutrients in a form that feeds your soil and the life in your soil. Then the plants can take from it what they need.

That said, if for some reason you feel the need to do what you were suggesting, adding composted manure, grass clippings, blood meal, used coffee grounds are sources of nitrogen. Burying a banana peel next to your plant helps feed it a bit of extra potassium. Wood ash also is a potassium source, but acidifying [by which of course I meant alkaline, see notes below] . Bone meal (that you asked about in a different post -- in this country, we just buy bone meal; I never heard of home gardeners making their own) is a source of phosphorus.
Last edited by rainbowgardener on Wed Jun 23, 2010 6:35 am, edited 1 time in total.
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sweet thunder
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rainbowgardener wrote:Wood ash also is a potassium source, but acidifying.
It is? I thought it was alkaline.

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rainbowgardener
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OH OOOPS! That was just a brain burp! I have said alkaline in many other posts around here and it just came out wrong this time!

Thanks so much for catching it!! I will fix it above!!
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iskhan
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Here Every thing is develop by yourself and if you want to buy NPK, DAP, Urea e.t.c. the minimum quantity is 50KG.
2nd there are no bone meal available here only BONES available.
I am using dry manure powder and compost as a fertilizer.
Because you are an expert so now you suggest me what to do?
1)I have Aubergine and Date giving not a single fruit.
2)Kidney Been and Lady Finger giving very little amount of fruits.
3)Apricot, Almond and Jambolan not growing.
4)Euphorbia milii & Pedilanthus tithymaloides leaves are folded.

garden5
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Here's the thing, it may not be that the nutrients are not available, but that the plants can't access it. Have you checked the ph of your soil? If it's too acidic or alkaline, that could be restricting your plant's ability to uptake the nutrients it needs.

Also, the nutrients may be there, but not in a plant-available form. For example, phosphorus can exist in the soil as rockphosphate, dicalciumphosphate, tricalciumphospahat, etc. I know I'm getting into chemistry here, but it's really kind of simple.

You see, when you add "pure" nutrients like you were suggesting, those nutrients can gas off, wash away, or combine into forms making them unavailable to plants. When you add compost, you are amending your soil, making retain nutrients better and you are also adding microbes, which help convert existing nutrients into plant-available forms.

If you don't have any compost, your best bet is to use RG's suggestions (blood meal, ash, etc.), but get that compost heap started :wink:.....you'll be glad you did.

Good luck with your garden :).
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Kisal
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Iskhan, bone meal is made by cooking raw bones, and then crushing them into a powder. The cooking process removes the fat and protein. Usually, the bones are steamed, but I think any cooking process would work okay. If you have bones left over from roasted or broiled/grilled meat, or perhaps bones that were used to make soup, those ought to be fine to use to make bone meal.

The difficult part will be crushing the bones into a powder, as they are quite hard. You could start by breaking them with a hammer. The small pieces might then be able to be ground in an electric blender. If you have some other type of grinder available ... perhaps a flour grinder, or maybe even a meat grinder ... that might work, too.

Blood meal would be more difficult to make at home, I think. It is actually animal blood that has been freeze-dried while being sprayed. I think it would require quite a lot of specialized equipment to do something like that at home. The only thing I can think of that might work would be to pour a very thin layer of blood onto some kind of plastic sheet and allow the moisture to evaporate. I'm not sure it would be a smell you would want around your home, though, and your neighbors might complain. It would probably attract a lot of flies and rats, too. I'll never forget the stench from the vat of blood and feathers that was being cooked at a chicken processing plant I once reviewed. Not good! :roll:
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I am so proud of you guys... :D

Iskhan, the advice here is very good so far. In particular I would recommend Rainbows first post to your question. Soil biology contains most of the nutrients you are looking for and when plentiful, provides a weak acid reaction that chemically etches the trace minerals and potassium directly from the minerla contents of soil...

We have been brainwashed into believing that the bounty of our planet is unlocked by chemical dispersions when, if we view Nature around us, our planet does this very nicely with simple food webs of biology. Our soil is no different; when it becomes a healthy teeming ecosystem it supports healthy vibrant plants...

While bone meals and blood are natural sources, we are treating symptoms, not the true reasons for lack of nutrient in the soil. Nutrition is bound to soils by carbon, and carbon is the root of all lifeforms on our planet. Once we build carbon levels in our soils, nutrition remains in abundance, supplied by the microscopic masses that live in that soil... you ask after phosphorus; this tells me your soil is very low in fungal mass. Fungi are rich in phospholipids, the waxy substance that makes mushrooms water-proof. Increase the fungal component of your soil and you will increase phosphorus content naturally...

I am most supportive of composts, and the carbon and biology that they bring back to soils. Manure and plant based composts return most everything our soils need; I use less and less fertilizer all the time, as I need less and less (I use fish based fertilizers as they feed both plants and soil biologies, including fungi). High carbon inputs will help your compost to be more fungal; wood shavings, shredded paper, seaweed or chopped twigs would all be beneficial...

Hoping this helps...

HG
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joey678923
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Re: How to make organic NPK separately?

NPK organic. Alfalfa hay 2.45 - .50 - 2.10

Apple, fruit .05 - .02 - .10

Apple, fruit pomace (what’s left after squeezing) .20 - .02 - .15

Apple leaves 1.00 - .15 - .35

Barley, grain 1.75 - .75 - .50

Basalt rock 0 - .78 - 1.29 (50% silica, 14 feO, 5 mgO, 8 caO, 3 sodiumO, .24 mnO)

Beet roots .25 - .10 - .50

Bonemeal, raw (2-4) - (22-25) - 0

Bonemeal, steamed (1-2) - (30+) - 0

Cattail reed and stems of waterlily 2.02 - .81 - 3.43

Coffee grounds (dried) 1.99 - .36 - .67

Corn, sweet 1.65 - .65 - .40

Corn, dent ? - .28 - .28

Corn, green stalks and leaves .30 - .13 -.33

Cottonseed 3.15 - 1.25 - 1.15

Cottonseed meal 7.00 - 2.50 - 1.50

Cowpeas, green vines and leaves .45 -.12 - .45

Cowpeas, seed 3.10 - 1.00 - 1.20

Crabgrass, green .66 - .19 - .71

Dog manure 1.97 - 9.95 - .30

Dried blood (12.00-15.00) - 3.00 - 0

Dried jellyfish 4.60 - 0 - 0

Duck manure, fresh 1.12 - 1.44 - .49

Eggs 2.25 - .40 - .15

Eggshells 1.19 - .38 - .14

Feathers 15.30 - 0 - 0

Felt and shoddy (4-12) - 0 - 0

Field bean, seed 4.00 - 1.20 - 1.30

Field bean, shell 1.70 - .30 - .35

Fish scrap, fresh water (2-7.5) - (1.5-6) -0

Fish scrap, salt water/red snapper and grouper 7.76 - 13.00 - 3.80

Garden beans, beans and pods .25 - .08 - .30

Gluten feed (4-5) - 0 - 0

Granite dust 0 - 0 - (3-5.5)

Grapes, fruit .15 - .07 - .30

Greensand (glauconite) 0 - 1.50 - 5.00

Greensand marl 0 - 0 - 7.0

Hair (12-16) - 0 - 0

Hen manure (fresh) 1.63 - 1.54 - .85

Hoofmeal and horndust 12.50 - 1.75 - 0

Horse manure (fresh) .44 - 17 - .35

Kentucky bluegrass, fresh .66 - .19 - .71

Kentucky bluegrass, dried hay 1.20 -.40 - 1.55

King crab, dried and ground 10.00 - .26 - .06

King crab, fresh (2-2.5) - 0 - 0

Leather, ground (10-12) - 0 - 0

Lemons .15 - .06 - .26

Lobster shells 4.60 - 3.52 - 0

Milk .50 - .30 - .18

Molassas 1 - 0 - 5

Mussels .90 - .12 - .13

Oak leaves .80 - .35 - .15

Oats, grain 2.00 - .80 - .60

Oranges .20 - .13 - .21

Peach leaves .90 - .15 - .60

Peanuts, seeds/kernels 3.60 - .70 - .45

Peanut shells .80 - .15 - .50

Phosphate rock/rock phosphorus 0 -(about 2%) - 0

Pigeon manure, fresh 4.19 - 2.24 - 1.41

Pine needles .46 - .12 - .03

Potatoes .35 - .15 - .50

Potatoes, leaves and stalks .60 - .15 - .45

Pumpkins, flesh .16 - .07 - .31

Pumpkins, seeds .87 - .50 - .45

Ragweed, great .76 - .26 - 0

Red clover, fresh .55 - .13 - .50

Red clover, hay 2.10 - .50 - 2.00

Redtop hay 1.20 - .35 - 1.00

Rice, grain (0?) - .32 - .34

Rice, brown (0?) - .25 - 0

Rockweed 1.90 - .25 - 3.68

Roses, flower .30 - .10 - .40

Salt-marsh hay 1.10 - .25 - .75

Sardine scrap 7.97 - 7.11 - 0

Seaweed, fresh 1.68 - .75 - 5.00

Sheep manure (fresh) .55 - .31 - .15

Shrimp heads, dried 7.82 - 4.20 - 0

Silkworm cocoons 9.42 - 1.82 - 1.08

Spanish moss .60 - .10 - .55

Starfish 1.80 - .20 - .25

Sunflower seed 2.25 - 1.25 - .79

Sweetpotatoes .25 - .10 - .50

Swine manure (fresh) .60 - .41 - .13

Tea grounds 4.15 - .62 - .40

Timothy hay 1.25 - .55 - 1.00

Tobacco, leaves 4.00- .50 - 6.00

Tobacco, stalks 3.70 - .65 - 4.50

Tobacco, stems 2.50 - .90 - 7.00

Tomatoes, fruit .20 - .07 - .35

Tomatoes, leaves .35 - .10 - .40

Tomatoes, stalks .35 - .10 - .50

Wheat, bran 2.65 - 2.90 - 1.60

Wheat, grain 2.00 - .85 - .50

Wheat, straw .50 - .15 - .60

White clover, fresh .50 - .20 - .30

joey678923
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Re: How to make organic NPK separately?

Top phosphorus for fast release is to burn bones crush them with a hammer in two bags add to water and use like a tea. Burned bone 0-34-0 dog manure 2-10-0 rock dust. 0-15-2 salt water fish 7-13-4



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