JONA878
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rainbowgardener wrote:So by maiden trees you mean little seedlings?
I mean one year old grafted trees.
They are around 4 - 5ft tall according to variety and good ones would have plent of small side shoots..( feathers )

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Farmer Dave
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Maiden trees

A maiden tree is usually considered a single 1 year stem, the product of budding or grafting. Similar to a whip.
I am raising my family on a permaculture homestead in Northern California. I like to shares my knowledge and passion for organic home gardening.

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JONA878
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Re: Maiden trees

Farmer Dave wrote:A maiden tree is usually considered a single 1 year stem, the product of budding or grafting. Similar to a whip.
The day when a fruit grower would be content with a single whip as a one year old apple maiden are gone.
Perhaps on some of the more difficult triploid varieties, ok, but in the main he would expect at least eight to ten feathers on his stem.
In that first year from budding he would want the nursery to induce bud initiation up the growing stem so that he does not have to cut back to get the branch system going.

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Farmer Dave
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stand corrected

Hey Jona
I see what you mean, I was using an old definition.
I am raising my family on a permaculture homestead in Northern California. I like to shares my knowledge and passion for organic home gardening.

https://www.family-gardens.com
See you there
Farmer Dave

Hibrix
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Hi guys

Have a look on google for rocket pots. An arborist here in Perth who I deal with swears by them. Bassically they prevent the fruit tree roots from curling back in on themselves. Sounds like a reasonable theory.
From little things big things grow

The Helpful Gardener
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Checked out some interesting pots at New England Grows that air pruned the roots, causing really great ramification near the root ends. One of them was the rocket pot, but there are several using this type tech. The guys on the bonsai forum have been doing this with colanders and such for a while. Really works...

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Scott Reil

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I have determined that fruit trees prefer to be abused, ignored, and basically misused.
I planted a dozen fruit trees, well cleared woods area, plenty of daylight, deeply dug holes, enriched, you name it. They were awesome.
They all died the first winter, notta thing left but a rotten stem.

The next go round, I bought 3 trees, and just as I arrived home, I got a phone call from the Army that my son was injured in Iraq, to get my passport in order.

Well, long story short, those trees got small holes, barely dug, right under a black walnut tree... to hold them, until I dealt with the crisis.

I went to Germany for 2 weeks, to be with my son. He is now okay.
I got home and on the third day home, recovering from jet lag, and catching up my house, unpacking etc... I managed to re-break my right hand and discovered it had been broken for about 2 months, and I thought it was only bruised. Well, the cast made it definite this time.

How to re-plant trees with a cast... wait it out.
Well, those trees survived with haphazard watering, and little more.
No compost, no mulch, no decent holes, nothing.

The next spring, I expected to pull out dead stems... they lived!
The first ones ever... Second winter one died...

It is now 5 years later and they are still alive. The peach tree sets fruits when the weather doesn't kill the blooms, but the apricot just makes leaves.

I did build boxes around them, and fill them with aged compost and keep it topped up now. But, they survived, the blackwalnut roots, the poorly prepared hole, the clay soil, the lack of care.... all of it.

I will never baby fruit trees again... it kills them.
Talk to your plants.... If your plants talk to you... Run!

The Helpful Gardener
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OL, sorry to hear about your boy but glad to hear he is okay. I wish him home ASAP (and the rest too).

HG
Scott Reil

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Ozark Lady
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Thanks, actually, he is home, he is no longer in the military at all. But, he would like to be...

We just have to believe that our sons and daughters there know what they are doing, and will do the best job they can.

My son felt that he made a difference while he was there. We need to be supportive of our military persons, whether we agree with the war, or reasons or not. Many were national guard, like my son, and didn't really mean to leave the country.

Aren't we fortunate to not live in a war-torn country? I have read of gardeners in countries where they must watch for mines while gardening... And my major worry is snakes...

I pray that America stays free and war free. And we can continue to gripe about the weather, the prices, the this and that... and not have to watch out for mines as we garden.
Talk to your plants.... If your plants talk to you... Run!

GeorgiaGirl
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GREAT info on this thread - thank you, Farmer Dave and others! I was just looking at peach and apple trees at the nursery this morning but decided against buying any just yet, scared of the thought of having to spray for bugs etc.

Where do you buy your fruit trees? At your favorite local nursery or are any of the online sites decent for good quality fruit trees at a not-too-outrageous cost?

Boy, Farmer Dave, I thought I was going fruit-tree-crazy by planning to plant 10-12 fruit and nut trees. I can't imagine having an orchard the size yours is -- how wonderful that must be!!
Julia in Georgia

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