Lil_Hell_Kat
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Location: Cambridge, ON

Tiger Lily

Hey everyone. I have given up most hope of getting any order in the yard this year, so I have decided to start for next year. I have a small spot on the side of the drive that the previous owners had planted tiger lilies. They have become way overgrown and I need to take them out. I had considered just thinning it out, but they grow into my drive and just seem to be too tall for their location. How do you remove all the bulbs? I hope they are bulbs cause ill feel stupid if they arent . Any suggestions as what I should do to my soil to prepare it for a good planting bed next year? I don't know just yet what I am planning for it as its very small maybe just a moss or something. Thx Kat

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Kisal
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Re: Tiger Lily

Lil_Hell_Kat wrote:Hey everyone. I have given up most hope of getting any order in the yard this year, so I have decided to start for next year. I have a small spot on the side of the drive that the previous owners had planted tiger lilies. They have become way overgrown and I need to take them out. I had considered just thinning it out, but they grow into my drive and just seem to be too tall for their location. How do you remove all the bulbs? I hope they are bulbs cause ill feel stupid if they arent . Any suggestions as what I should do to my soil to prepare it for a good planting bed next year? I don't know just yet what I am planning for it as its very small maybe just a moss or something.
Don't feel stupid! :) I have all kinds of daylilies in my yard. I love 'em. But it's been awhile since I dug any of them up. As I recall, the roots are more of a tuber than an actual bulb, but my memory could well be off! :lol:

I would use a digging fork to uproot them, but a spade or small shovel would work, too, if that's all you have. Depending on the type of soil you have, you might want to soak the ground where they're planted a day or two before you dig, just to make things easier on yourself.

Here are some step-by-step instructions I found online:

"1. Prepare a new Daylily bed.

Preparing the soil for a new daylily bed before digging the old clump allows you to get the divisions into the ground without delay, before their roots become dried and damaged from exposure to the open air. Remove any weeds from the chosen spot and work the soil to a depth of a foot or so, incorporating several inches of peat moss to make the soil more pliable and moisture-retentive.

2. Dig the clump

Cut back the Daylily's long outer leaves to about 6 inches to make it easier to handle. Try not to damage the new inner leaves growing in the center of each fan. With a pitch fork loosen the soil all around the clump. Work around the perimeter several times to free as many of the roots from the soil as possible. Because daylilies develop extensive root systems, it may be necessary to dig down 10-12 inches.

Next, use the fork to pry the entire clump out of the ground. Shake or wash excess soil off the roots so you can see the individual fans.

3. Make Divisions

Once out of the ground, a large, solid clump of daylilies can look pretty daunting. Begin by separating it into two sections; use two spading forks placed back to back in the center of the root mass to pry the halves apart. Then pull each section apart or use a sharp knife to cut the clump into smaller and smaller chunks.

4. Plant the Divisions

Dig the planting holes 18 inches to 2 feet apart and wider than the root masses. Then make a small mound of soil in the center of each hole, set the crown of the division on it, and spread the roots evenly around it. If some roots are too long, trim them back to eight inches or so rather than cramming them into the hole. Firm the soil over the roots, covering the crown with no more than an inch of soil. A plant buried under too much soil may rot.

Water the plants well and tuck a light mulch in around their bases (but not over the crowns) to help the soil retain moisture. During hot spells, shade the new plants with shingle or shade cloth supported on stakes. When freezing weather approaches, cover them with a mulch of straw or evergreen boughs. The covering protects the young plants from being heaved out of the ground by alternate freezing and thawing of the soil."

(from https://www.daytonnursery.com/tips/Daylilies.htm)

HTH! :)

minnesota_girl
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Tiger lilies are bulbs, don't feel stupid. Daylilies are more of a tuber like Kisal said. If possible I would wait until it cools down a little to seperate them. I don't know about where you live, but I would wait until September or October, then I would dig them up but DO NOT remove the stem, your lilies might not overwinter well if you do. Wait until the stem turns brown then feel free to remove.

As for preparing a bed for next year, why wait until next year plant you lilies in the fall and they should come up fine. What kind of soil do you have? Lilies aren't too picky but, if you soil is like mine you may want to add manure. I have horses so I just add horse manure after it decomposes somewhat. There are plenty of options for amending your soil.
Last edited by minnesota_girl on Sun Aug 17, 2008 6:41 pm, edited 1 time in total.

MaineDesigner
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Minnesota_gal provided good advice but I have one small caveat to add: Tiger lilies, Lilium lancifolium or Lilium tigrinium, can be (note "can be" not always are) carriers for several lily family viruses. The tiger lilies are effectively immune (highly tolerant) and may not show symptoms but if they carry viruses they can be transmitted to other lilies which are susceptible. I wouldn't lose sleep over it but it is something to watch for if you have other lilies. If you see symptoms all you can do is rip them out and destroy them.

minnesota_girl
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What are the symptoms? I have tons of lilies in my yard, kind of a favorite of mine. In fact one just bloomed today, I was excited because I had bought it in a mix so I didn't know what color it was. It turned out it was a bright pink. Very bold pink.

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rainbowgardener
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Lkjh,etc... All flowers (bananas are a partial exception) produce seeds. The lily is a bulb and produces seeds. The bulb produces bulblets that can be split off into new plants and the seeds will also sprout.

It's your science project, do a little reading!

Here's one little place to start:

https://www.herbs2000.com/flowers/l_propagation.htm

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