TheLorax
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Way to go European Union!

Way to go European Union!

PRATIQUE
https://secure.csl.gov.uk/pratique/index.cfm
CSL launches new pest risk analysis system!

Defra agency Central Science Laboratory (CSL) has launched PRATIQUE -
Enhancements of Pest Risk Analysis Techniques, the EU Seventh Framework
research project.

Expansion in the global trade of plant material over the last century has
led to a steady increase in the rate of entry and establishment of new,
economically or environmentally damaging plant pests, diseases and
invasive alien species.
The threat is likely to further increase as a
result of climate change and EU expansion.
See link below for the full article text-
https://www.freshinfo.com/index.php?s=n&ss=nd&sid=45805&s_txt=&s_date=0&ms=&offset=0

Way to go UK!
https://www.parliament.uk/documents/upload/stSTDEFRA.pdf

wingdesigner
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Nosh kidding.
Happy Gardening,
Wing

TheLorax
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Pretty exciting isn't it! Look for the US to be coming in through a back door in the very near future!

New Zealand has been leading the pack for quite a few years. The time to begin modeling after their successes was long overdue.

wingdesigner
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Well, that's what I get for not reading the full article; I was only responding to the part you quoted, Lorax. Sorry.
Happy Gardening,
Wing

TheLorax
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Ahhh, it's pretty dry reading so you aren't missing much. Exciting for anyone who works in natural areas though.

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Jess
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Excellent and about time!
Defra is not the most pro-active government body. We hear lots of noise about various pests/ alien species having an effect on our natives but we never see a face. Lets hope things change now.
The only time there was any real effort put in to controlling a new disease was when Phytophthora ramorum arrived. That was scary as if it had been found on the premises we would have been shut down. Plant passports are all very well for tracing back where the disease comes from but it still hits the business at the end of the chain most.
Knowing without doing is like plowing without sowing."

TheLorax
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Say Jess,

Old news but did you see this-
[url=https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1022484/War-declared-invasive-foreign-fauna-costing-2bn-battle.html]War declared on invasive foreign flora and fauna costing £2bn to battle[/url]

excerpt-
New measures to slash the £2billion cost of tackling invasive foreign plants and animals to cut the threat to Britain's wildlife were announced today. Non-native species such as floating pennywort and American mink cause enormous damage to the British environment, the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs said. And with climate change, more species are expected to arrive in Britain as warming temperatures cause them to move
They are taking over our waterways, hunting down our native animals and spreading disease.

So fearsome is the invasion of foreign plants, animals and insects that combating it costs Britain £2billion a year, the Government said yesterday.

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Jess
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Nope. I don't tend to read newspapers (apart from the local) and I didn't hear anything about it on the news.
I did spot a stand of knotweed the other day. I meant to stop and ask the owners of the land if they have reported it as it is a notifiable weed. DEFRA tend to take note of that one too as it can destroy a building given half a chance.
A friend sent me a photo of a new build site he was on a few months ago. Knotweed had come through an interior wall of a house that had only been built the year before!
I still can't believe that mink were ever imported for fur. What were they thinking?! Greed, as usual, takes priority over common sense.
In the last week I have come across several Harlequin ladybirds and dispatched them. I have yet to see a New Zealand flatworm as they are supposedly in this area but I did find a rosemary beetle on one of my plants last year and squished that!
On a more positive note I heard today that the first pair of beavers have been reintroduced to Britain after 500 years and have settled in well. https://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk/7472988.stm Some people still not sure whether it is a good idea.
Pretty sure I spotted a red kite not so long ago. They too were bred for rerelease a few years ago and are flourishing. :D
https://www.redkites.co.uk/
Knowing without doing is like plowing without sowing."

TheLorax
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I still can't believe that mink were ever imported for fur. What were they thinking?! Greed, as usual, takes priority over common sense.
Hey, that's our mink! Give it back to us ;) In defense of both of our Countries, I don't think we collectively knew as much back then as we do now. It's really as simple as that. My question would be why didn't we begin to take more action back when we first began learning of the unprecedented toll these introductions were taking on our environment. Better late than never though. Speaking of what were we thinking deals, are you familiar with the Nutria we imported for fur?
https://www.friendsofblackwater.org/nutria.html

I understand you have a big environmental mess on your hands thanks to our eastern bullfrog, Canadian goose, gray squirrel, and northern cottontail.

https://www.europe-aliens.org/

I have difficulty dispatching much of anything although I will suck up Asian lady beetles with a shop vac, cringe when I have to empty a rat zapper that I set, and do realize all feral cats I trap are humanely destroyed after animal control picks them up. That's the upper end of my limit currently although I do have personal friends who prefer native species who are like you and are capable of doing what needs to be done.

An incredible amount of research went into the re-introduction of those beavers. Bravo for them. Sure do wish we'd see the re-introduction of wolves around here and for that matter cougars.

Here's a list of the world's top 100 invasive species-
https://www.conservationinstitute.org/invasivespecies.htm

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