AmyL
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Bought plants-NOT Planting-them to live through winter-HELP!

Good Day,

First of all - sorry if this is placed in the wrong forums...


Okay so I want to start landscaping and just starting all over. I bought some plants 'cause they were on sale (since it's getting cold). Can't plant them now and need to wait for spring

So... 2 nurseries told me 2 different things

#1- You gotta place them indoor or in a insulated garage... can't let root freeze or they will die. Water infrequently, they need some sun

#2- They are outdoor plants and you shouldn't have them indoors. What kills a plant is "shock" not the freezing of roots or whatnot - quick changes in temperature. If you wanted them indoor make sure you keep them in the garage and NOT indoors where it is warm. Recommended to water them well then huddle the plants together and cover their pots with mulch. That should insulate and keep them alive during the winter months - since temperature changes etc, happen gradually. Keep them in less windy areas if possible


I live on the border of Detroit, Michigan (in Windsor, Ontario, Canada)

Plants:
- 2 Blue Point Spirals
- 2 Blue Point Poodles
- 1 Juniper Blue Alps (weird thing for this plant is... can't keep to find it in google... wrong name?) See [url]https://helpfulgardener.com/forum/viewtopic.php?p=277460#277460[/url]

- Plan to get a few more plants

Thanks[/code]

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jal_ut
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I assume you want these for planting outdoors next season?

Is your ground frozen? If not I would plant them now, tamp the soil well, water well, then mulch. I think they will fare better outdoors where they are intended to be than in a garage. Fall planted trees often do better than spring planted.
Gardening at 5000 feet elevation, zone 4/5 Northern Utah, Frost free from May 25 to September 8 +/-

AmyL
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Well the reason why I can't plant them is because

1- We plan on changing the garden's entire look in the spring

2- It's right now in the high 40s and there is even talk of some snow next week... that's hardly fall at this point. To top it of, my brothers/father aren't home and I tried digging a hole... the ground is to hard and yeah I feel pathetic and weak

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applestar
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What is your USDA Hardiness zone? (this is based on average lowest temperature in winter)
What are the hardiness range of the plants you purchased?

(I believe Canadian hardiness zone scale is different from US's but if you know what that is for your location and the plants, we could work from those numbers as well)

DoubleDogFarm
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#2 "Healing in" is the practice here. Cluster your potted and or balled and burlapped plants in a sheltered area. Now cover with mulch, saw dust, wood chips or even leaves. Leaves may blow away. Be careful. It's winter, almost, I don't think Sun is all that critical. I would shoot for 4 to 6 inches of material over the pots.

Eric

Green Mantis
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If you can do what Jal_ut says, if not go with what DDF says.

Do you "ever" sound like me :oops:

Did the same thing, got everything planted, barely in time.

Except my Garlic. :(

DDf knows "all" about this, :oops:

Still hoping to get really well rotted virtually soil in here, and plant the garlic cloves in my above ground garden.

Just need to get the soil in there. But I "think" I'm too late, ground has frozen here. :(

Am hoping it will warm up like the weatherman says? If so I'm going for it.

If not, not sure what to do about those garlic then?????

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applestar
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I missed planting garlic last fall and planted them in January when southern state folks started talking about planting them then. We had an extra mild winter and ground had thawed. Harvested very nice garlic though three of the Elephant garlic ended up as walnut sized single bulbs. I saved them and planted them yesterday so hopefully they will grow into monster sized, properly separated into cloves, elephant garlic bulbs next summer. 8)

So yeah, plant them if the ground thaws enough to get those cloves planted. :wink:

AmyL
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Okay I need to be honest here... I'm a pathetic excuse for a female (oh and I live alone for the nest 6 months)- I can't lift 40 pounds worth of stuff - much less dig a hole that will fit a 140++ pound plant (the larger one is). I can dig a large not-so-deep hole and toss the plants in then cover with mulch. Would this work? A hole that may not cover the entire pot, then water it, then mulch it. If I have to, I could remove the mulch during the winter and water it every so often. Problem is... we're fully landscaping and we got actual rocks! Yes rocks... the person before us had a drive way build and filled the ground with pebbles/rocks or something - hence the total landscaping... so planting is not an option. The backyard is for grass and that has already been layed so I don't want to disrupt it but digging holes there (at least temporary holes).

Another question... - assuming I can't dig a hole myself (i will try - bought a good pickaxe)... I have two options

1- Place plants under the deck - almost no wind. Buttom is concrete not grass though - water, then mulch 'em in.... now it's concrete... so...

2- Place them on grass, water them, mulch 'em in - may be windy-ish

Which of the two is better?

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tomf
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I huddle plants ever year but it does not get cold like where you live. I would put some mulch under the pots and put them on the cement.
When you dig the holes make sure the ground is not dry or it will be hard to dig, water it if needed and the soil should come up easy. If you are dealing with rocks can you get a tractor in to dig them up?

AmyL
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Well I don't have a contractor yet - relandscaping will happen in spring. Myself I can't dig through rocks but there are a few inches of clay before the rocks.

So just to clarify - placing the plants on concrete instead of grass is okay right? Now I read somewhere that placing mulch under the plants would let cold air around the roots - so it's not recommended... is that true?

Thanks

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tomf
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You want the multch or what ever you put down to be tight so as not to let air in. Some kind of insulation to help keep the cold from the cement would be good as cement holds the cold and will transmit it to the roots.

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applestar
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I don't know if under the deck idea would work or not since I've never tried anything like that. But assuming it would, why don't you get flattened corrugated appliance box (like for refrigerator) and put that underneath?

That should help insulate and *if still intact in spring*, make it easier to drag the whole pile out from under the deck. If you are willing to spend the extra expense, a sheet of plywood might be even better.

AmyL
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applestar wrote:I don't know if under the deck idea would work or not since I've never tried anything like that. But assuming it would, why don't you get flattened corrugated appliance box (like for refrigerator) and put that underneath?

That should help insulate and *if still intact in spring*, make it easier to drag the whole pile out from under the deck. If you are willing to spend the extra expense, a sheet of plywood might be even better.
I actually do have a TON of cardboard boxes for appliances, computers, TVs - that would work better than having them on plain cement?

I can place these boxes (flattened) on top of the cement and under the deck (where there is very little wind) and have the plants huddle on it - better idea?

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