Choggy
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Posts: 18
Joined: Fri Jan 19, 2007 10:29 pm
Location: London, UK

Really basic silly question from a beginner....

I've just bought a house and I'm a bit confused about whether my garden is North facing or South facing. It seems like such an obvious question that I feel like a complete twit being able to work it out, but I've seen a graphic which implies that my original assumption might be incorrect.

My garden is to the South of my house, and since I live in the Northern Hemisphere, this means that the bit of the garden which is closest to my house is in shaddow while the end of the garden gets the sun. Would I be right in thinking that my garden is North Facing? And if so, why does the graphic on the Light Levels Challenge at this site: https://www.bbc.co.uk/gardening/htbg/module1/light1.shtml imply that my garden is actually South Facing?! (to see what I mean, click the link for the Light Levels Challenge, and click "N" at the bottom right - you'll see that the graphic shows the part of the garden which is NEAR the house to be light, while the end is shaded)

Newt
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Posts: 1868
Joined: Wed May 26, 2004 2:44 am
Location: Maryland zone 7

My garden is to the South of my house, and since I live in the Northern Hemisphere, this means that the bit of the garden which is closest to my house is in shaddow while the end of the garden gets the sun. Would I be right in thinking that my garden is North Facing?
Yes, if the garden is to the south of your house then the garden faces south. If you are looking out the back door, and the sun rises to your left, then your garden faces south.

If you are looking out your back door and the sun rises to your right, then your garden faces north.

Here's a couple of things to keep in mind. In the winter the sun will be lower in the sky as it moves from east to west. If there are no obstructions such as trees and/or fences and your garden faces south, the sun will probably extend more into the house. In the summer the sun will be higher in the sky and it will be shadier closer to the house. Did I just confuse you more? :?

Any fences will block some of the sun, especially in the winter since the sun is lower in the sky.

I enjoyed the bird song at that sight, but found I was confused by the light aspect it shows.

Did that help?
Newt

Choggy
Full Member
Posts: 18
Joined: Fri Jan 19, 2007 10:29 pm
Location: London, UK

Newt wrote:
My garden is to the South of my house, and since I live in the Northern Hemisphere, this means that the bit of the garden which is closest to my house is in shaddow while the end of the garden gets the sun. Would I be right in thinking that my garden is North Facing?
Yes, if the garden is to the south of your house then the garden faces south. If you are looking out the back door, and the sun rises to your left, then your garden faces south.

If you are looking out your back door and the sun rises to your right, then your garden faces north.

Here's a couple of things to keep in mind. In the winter the sun will be lower in the sky as it moves from east to west. If there are no obstructions such as trees and/or fences and your garden faces south, the sun will probably extend more into the house. In the summer the sun will be higher in the sky and it will be shadier closer to the house. Did I just confuse you more? :?

Any fences will block some of the sun, especially in the winter since the sun is lower in the sky.

I enjoyed the bird song at that sight, but found I was confused by the light aspect it shows.

Did that help?
Newt
It does indeed help. It tells me I was right all along and that the BBC site must just have their graphics confused ;)

Newt
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Posts: 1868
Joined: Wed May 26, 2004 2:44 am
Location: Maryland zone 7

Did you look as soon as you posted to see if the 'edit' button showed?

Newt

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