hgunder
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Joined: Fri Aug 18, 2006 12:32 am
Location: central MA

Is ivyleaf morning glory invasive?

I have an ivyleaf morning glory vine in my garden. I can't tell if it falls into the invasive/noxious category. Should I rip it out before it sets seeds or is it okay here in MA? Thanks.

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Grey
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Joined: Sun Apr 17, 2005 12:42 am
Location: Summerville, GA, Zone 7a

I *think* in your area it is ok.

I know around me (zone 7) it is invasive, because our growing season is that much longer.

hgunder
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Joined: Fri Aug 18, 2006 12:32 am
Location: central MA

Thanks. I'll save a few seeds and see what happens next year. I can always rip it out next year if it starts invading.

opabinia51
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Location: Victoria, BC

I would check your states invasive list. Morning Glory (once it is established) can be very invasive.

Flowerpots
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Location: Melbourne, Australia

Where I live it is considered a week, looks in in pots and kept under control thoough, a bit like jasmine as well.

Newt
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Location: Maryland zone 7

If the seeds are anything like the traditional morning glory, then you'll find it will reappear year after year. We had to remove about 6" of topsoil from the garden 5 years ago. I still find morning glories appearing from time to time even though I haven't grown any in all that time. The seeds are very hard and can stay dormant in the soil for several years. Digging in the garden brings some to the surface. They're easy enough to pull out if you spot them, but they do drop alot of seeds.

Newt

slakker
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Location: Coquitlam, Canada

I'm not sure if it's the same, but we call perenial Morning Glory, Bindweed in our area and it is VERY invasive (zone 8). I'm been fightin gthese things all summer to stop it from choking everything in sight.

It climbs on my rhodos, hydrageas, astilbies, etc.. What I've resorted to is daily manual weeding and spot herbicide on the root base and spraying the leaves.

Newt
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Location: Maryland zone 7

Slakker, the roots of mature bindweed can go 14' deep in the soil! Bindweed is not morning glory, it's Convolvulus arvensis. This site has some interesting info on it.
https://www.ipm.ucdavis.edu/PMG/WEEDS/field_bindweed.html

I don't agree with their chemical recommendations, but if you have some mature plants that you haven't been able to eliminate, you might want to try this with vinegar.

Put about an inch of vinegar in a clear plastic container with a tight fitting lid like you might get at the deli with potato salad. Cut a slit in the lid and insert the tips of the vine in the vinegar when in active growth (has leaves on it and the leaves need to be in the solution). Leave the vines in the solution for 48 hours and then cut the vines near the lid. To remove the vine from the lid, be sure and take the container to a safe place so that no vinegar splashes on anything precious. You can reuse the vinegar until it is all absorbed. Everytime I find a new sprout I do this same procedure.

Good luck,
Newt

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