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Chaesman
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Location: Missouri, usa

Plant zone?

Ok I live in South east missouri about 120 miles south of saint louis and just north of sikeston mo it is what is considered the bootheal region and I am trying to figure out what planting zone I am in for veggies and trees
thanks for your help :?:
Jon

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Kisal
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Location: Oregon

Sikeston is in zone 6b, but I think you're right on the line, or very close to, zone 7a. You can probably grow plants rated for either of those zones if you place them in the appropriate microclimates on your property.

You can find your zone by entering your zip code on [url=https://www.garden.org/zipzone/]this site[/url]. Googling USDA planting zone will find several similar pages. You'll want to do that if your zip code is different from Sikeston's. :)
"Isn't it enough to see that a garden is beautiful without having to believe that there are fairies at the bottom of it too?" - Douglas Adams

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Chaesman
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Location: Missouri, usa

From the link you provided it lists Benton Mo as 6a (Thanks for the link).

So does this mean I should only grow Items rated for this zone or does it mean I just have to take precautions such as indoor starting and so forth to grow other things?
Jon

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Kisal
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You'll probably be able to grow plants from at least zone 6b, and perhaps 7a and 7b as well. Hardiness is usually expressed as a "range", such as "hardy to zone 5." Such plants will grow nicely in warmer areas, and there are usually different varieties of a species that can take more cold or heat. There really won't be all that many limits on what you can grow.

Depending on how much effort you want to put into it, you might even be able to succeed with plants from much warmer zones. Giving the plant what it requires is what it amounts to. If a particular plant can't handle the winters in your area, you might be able to grow it in a container and bring it indoors during the cold season. :)
"Isn't it enough to see that a garden is beautiful without having to believe that there are fairies at the bottom of it too?" - Douglas Adams

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applestar
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Location: Zone 6, NJ (3/M)4/E ~ 10/M

I can't find it right now but some one posted a link to a site where you can enter your zip code to get accumulated record of average first and last frost dates for the zip code area. That's pretty useful too since seed sowing and started seedling planting out timings are closely related to those dates.

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Kisal
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That's the 6th post in [url=https://www.helpfulgardener.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=30588]this thread[/url]. DoubleDogFarm posted it. :)
"Isn't it enough to see that a garden is beautiful without having to believe that there are fairies at the bottom of it too?" - Douglas Adams

Dead Rabbit
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im curioius as to what zone im in also....is there a map here or elswhere anyone knows that they can link me too

thanks

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Kisal
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Click on the link in my first post in this thread. The link is the words "this site". It is the URL to a page where you can enter your zip code and find out your USDA plant hardiness zone. :)
"Isn't it enough to see that a garden is beautiful without having to believe that there are fairies at the bottom of it too?" - Douglas Adams

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