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applestar
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Location: Zone 6, NJ (3/M)4/E ~ 10/M

That's terrible! Though from your description, I suppose it looks natural, like a wildflower meadow (and I'm sure you worked hard to make it look that way).

Would it help to put up a sign or a kiosk with list of flowers and descriptions to show that the area is intentionally planted. Maybe a friendly handwritten sign saying something like "Native Flower Garden -- Please look and enjoy, but leave for the next person's enjoyment as well." Something unobtrusive to mark the area? (logs, stumps, rocks?)

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tomf
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The nerve of some people! :roll:

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applestar
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Location: Zone 6, NJ (3/M)4/E ~ 10/M

That was no "lady" :x :roll:

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BewilderedGreenyO.o
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Location: San Bernardino Mountains, California

Marlingardener wrote:One day I went to the barn and found a lady had picked up two pots and was walking back to the gate (which she had opened) to put them in the trunk of her car! I told her to return them, checked the trunk to find four more plants there! She said, "Well, they were just sitting there and I thought they were for anybody."
*Gasp* .... wow how awkward that must have been :shock: your lucky you caught her before she took all of them lol it sounds like she had most of them in her trunk by the time you caught her. Would have been a huge loss. Some People these days! Sheesh! :roll:
Confusion at its Finest :D
I'm rooting for you!

*USDA Zone 8b :: Sunset Zone ?*
https://bewilderedgreeny.weebly.com/

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tomf
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tomf wrote:The nerve of some people! :roll:
:roll:

She knew what she was doing.

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microcollie
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Location: Western MA

There's been a discussion going on in the veg forum about keeping raccoons at bay, and that made me wonder...What's the biggest hav-a-heart trap out there? (the pellet gun seems a little harsh even to me). Just bait it with some spare daylilies............

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Gary350
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Joined: Mon Mar 23, 2009 5:59 pm
Location: TN. 50 years of gardening experience.

I like the free cookies every day at 3 pm at Yosemite. That is the only thing I liked there. $400 a night is too much for a motel room. $50 a plate is too much for dinner at the restaurant dinner for 4 is $200. Every thing is too over priced there. Camp site $50 per night is way too much. I have been there once and I have no desire to get screwed again.
Last edited by Gary350 on Mon Aug 02, 2010 10:38 pm, edited 2 times in total.

cynthia_h
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Location: El Cerrito, CA

microcollie wrote:What's the biggest hav-a-heart trap out there?
According to the Hav-a-Hart website, their largest is 42" x 15" x 15":

https://www.havahart.com/store/live-animal-traps?&sortby=BestSellers&pageDisplay=22

Cynthia H.
Sunset Zone 17, USDA Zone 9

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Kisal
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Location: Oregon

When I worked at the Humane Society, we had a couple of live traps that were about 2' x 2' x 5' that we used to capture dogs that had been living on their own for awhile. Dogs that are dumped in rural areas, and which manage to survive by hunting and scavenging, often become very timid and fearful of people. Trapping was the only way to capture them, so we could help them.

The largest live trap I found available online just now is 48 in. wide x 36 in. tall x 96 in. long. It's intended for feral hogs, wild dogs, cougars, etc. It's roughly the size of the back of a full-sized pickup truck. And if it's gonna hold a hog or cougar, it's one tough trap! :lol:

BTW, if you're thinking of trapping an animal, you might want to phone your nearest F&W office to see if there are any special regulations you need to observe. Where I live, you have to have a permit to trap anything. You just go to the F&W office and they give you the permit ... which is free ... and if you want, they will rent you an appropriate live trap for a very nominal fee, which is 100% refundable when you return the trap.
"Isn't it enough to see that a garden is beautiful without having to believe that there are fairies at the bottom of it too?" - Douglas Adams

thanrose
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Location: Jacksonville, FLZone 9A

I think microcollie is talking about hav-a-hart traps for humans that would be drawn by plant-snatching. I thought it was funny.

Everyone is going to draw the line somewhere: we just differ on where exactly.

I've taken seeds, even a few pinched cuttings. Depends on where, how prolific, and to a great degree my familiarity with that plant and that situation. So a pinch of a lawn invading mint from a big public park in my town doesn't seem unreasonable, but I only gaze with plant lust in my heart at some young papayas on the periphery of the same park.

For the most part, I adhere to, "Take nothing but photographs, leave nothing but footprints."

OTOH, I've definitely benefitted from land under development, both as a native plants person in sanctioned rescues and as a passerby digging up crinums ahead of the bulldozer. I've also removed yard waste debris from illegal dumping sites. One of my prize plants came from such ignoble beginnings.

A plant list with an entirely different focus than here recently had some pretty vociferous positions made clear between large property owners and those not in that situation. People with acreage said pretty much that if you pilfer fruit, fallen or not, you are stealing from them or from the wildlife that lives on their property. They were also pretty unanimous about not being obligated to post signs delineating their property.

I think there is room for all of the viewpoints, but that certain mindsets will prevail in some areas. In a metropolitan area, you won't have many people believing that one should expect to be greeted with a shotgun if you wander off a trail. But that is exactly what will happen in some of those areas with large property owners of rural tracts.

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