Geekcore
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A question about cloning

I'm not entirely sure this belongs in this section... Forgive me if I'm mistaken <(^.^)>

I've read that cloning requires leaching (which I've never had to do) but as far as I know... leaching is washing.... everything from the soil(?) Which I would think would be done on potted plants (via the hole in the bottom). But, the article doesn't specify weather this is for potted or grounded plants... at any rate it says to: "Leach the soil with water, at a rate of 1 gallon water per 5 gallons of soil, once a day for 5 days prior to cloning". Which now that I think about it... I suppose that would be enough water to filter anything through the ground huh... haha But I ramble... my questions are this:

1. Is it necessary to leach prior to attempting to clone?
2. Are the aforementioned instructions the proper leaching for grounded plants? (more specifically American Wisteria)
3. Is it likely that a plant will root without the use of a root hormone? (I figure since wisteria seems to me, to be an extremely hearty plant it would be just fine)


Thank You in advance for any help.

opabinia51
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It's not totally necessary to use entirely sterile media when attempting to create a clone from a cutting.

The plant horemones that causing rooting are called Auxins and Giberellins and are naturally found in soils. A lot of people like to use perlite to start their clones in because it is sterile and therefore does not contain an potential pathogens.

However, I always, always, always place my cuttings in nutrient rich soil. This way, you don't have to rememberto transfer your tree to a nutrient medium after they have formed roots. The nutrients are already there and your plant can start acquiring nutrients right away.

Also, with a healthy population of microbes, the pathogens will be held in check by the beneficials and the plants immune system (in the form of secondary metabolites) will be able to start coping with any pathogenic soil microbes from the outset. This will produce a healthier, plant in the long run.

Geekcore
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Okay so... let me make sure I've got all this info processed correctly <(^.^)>
opabinia51 wrote:It's not totally necessary to use entirely sterile media when attempting to create a clone from a cutting.
So leaching isn't a must.(?)
opabinia51 wrote: The plant horemones that cause rooting are called Auxins and Giberellins and are naturally found in soils.
A good soil will help promote root growth w/o the use of store bought hormones.(?)
opabinia51 wrote: ...I always place my cuttings in nutrient rich soil. This way, you don't have to rememberto transfer your tree to a nutrient medium after they have formed roots. The nutrients are already there and your plant can start acquiring nutrients right away.
So putting the cutting in rich soil while waiting for the roots will give it essentially what it needs to fight off any potential harm from putting it into plain soil.(?)
opabinia51 wrote: ...with a healthy population of microbes, the pathogens will be held in check by the beneficials and the plants immune system (in the form of secondary metabolites) will be able to start coping with any pathogenic soil microbes from the outset. This will produce a healthier, plant in the long run.
What doesn't kill it makes it stronger.(?)

opabinia51
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Yes, I really don't know where that leaching idea came from because it seems counter intuitive. If you want to use sterilized soil, then that would be fine. A lot of people do that and have very good results. If you want a totally nutrient free environment that is also sterile, use perlite or vermiculite. But, there would be no point in buying a soil, leaching all the nutrients out of it, just to resupply them again once you have a seedling.

And yes, personally, I don't like killing off all the flora and fauna because you are not just killing the bad stuff but also the good stuff which, are actually way way way more abundant that any bad micro and maco-organisms.

Yes, Auxins and Giberellins are a part of a good soil but, buying some more wouldn't hurt. I think it is about 3-8 dollars for a small vile of rooting hormone. This will last you for years, so it is a good investment. But, you may wish to try rooting some with and some without to see what works better. My Aunt never uses the stuff and has great success. I always try both methods.


With regard to the rich soil and MO's within it. YES. :D

Oh and yes, if you encourage a healthy soil to grow up around the litttle seedlings, the soil will be that much more able to control disease as, will the plant.

One underlying notion of organic gardening is this:

FEED THE SOIL, NOT THE PLANT.

Geekcore
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As for the leeching it said to do so prior to taking the cutting... and the plant I'm wanting to take it from is in the ground. Maybe it would have helped if I had made that clear from the start huh <(^.^)>
"Adde Parvum Parvo Magnus Acervus Erit."

~Publius Ovidius Naso

"Ego Modus Operandi Est Amalgam."

~Samurai Champloo

opabinia51
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Now that is interesting.

So, the information that you have accessed so far states that you should starve the parent plant before taking the cutting?

Very interesting..... here is my take on that:

By starving the parent plant, you are depriving it of nutrients and therefore, denying it of the necessary growth elements that it needs. Therefore, it will most likely produce more secondary metabolites and essentially start going into a sort of dormancy. All of the stomata will probably close to conserve water and it may produce excess amounts of various hormones (I am never sure about the spelling of that word).

This could work.... yes, very interesting.

However, after taking the cutting, you are going to want to put back the nutrients that you have leached away from the soil by adding; compost, composted manure, organic fertilizers, etc. Otherwise the parent plant will be that much worse for wear. And that much more prone to disease, dessication and the like.

cheers and thanks for the clarification.

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