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applestar
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I need emotional support! Neighbor must have herbicided HIS

I went out for my usual morning stroll around the garden and discovered that much of my Native Shade Garden is wilted. :( I have a strong suspicion that my neighbor has sprayed HIS side of the fence with some kind of an herbicide (good neighbor -- ha! :x -- type of wooden fence with boards on alternating sides, leaving approx 2" gap if you look at it from an angle)

I'm going to find out what he used, but at this point, there's dismal hope that these growing collection of native plants I've been establishing over the past 3 years will survive.... :( :( :(

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Ozark Lady
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Oh no!
I am so sorry, Apple.

It is too late to say much more than how sorry that I am.

Hey, some that the electric company thought they killed are going to sprout and come back. So, I think some of yours might too. So, don't be too quick to remove them. Sure once it is dead remove the top, but any living roots, just might push up again. A major set back, but my tough old rose bushes look like they just might fight their way back. And of course the spraying didn't bother the locust trees much at all. Although everything looked dead at the time.

I would be looking for some solid plastic or glass to put behind my plants all along where folks could spray and do that. Or at least board it up solid in some way.

The sprayed stuff developed a weird mottled look to the leaves, and then they wilted and started turning and dying. Look for the mottled look.

But, I would be finding out what they sprayed, so you know if you have more that will be dying. But, by the time you find them wilting, it is too late to save the present foliage. Your only hope is that the roots are strong enough to send up new.
Talk to your plants.... If your plants talk to you... Run!

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applestar
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I know Ozark Lady. It's heartbreaking.

Tiarella, Heuchera, Turks Cap lilies, tips of native Azaleas just starting to bud though not the entire shrubs, just emerging False Solomon's seal, almost full carpet of sweet violets, Maiden hair fern, Hay Scented fern, Ostrich fern, Applemint (well, OK that's not native :wink: ... and yes it was in a container.), Jewel weed, American Wild Ginger, Native Pachysandra, Willow in a container waiting to be planted, Peach seedling in a container, just purchased still in its pot Bleeding Heart.... :evil:

I just finished talking with the wife, who of course said they NEVER spray anything, but they have a rock mulched area on the other side of the worst affected section of the garden....

FWIW, I've mixed up a compost soak, strained and mixed with my own A-EM and Neptune's fish and water can drenched the area.

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Kisal
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Awww, rats, Applestar! :(

I used to have that kind of fence, and one year my helpful neighbor decided to spray the weeds along my side of the alley with herbicide when he did his. I usually just went out with my weedeater once a week to keep them down.

When he sprayed, killed all my beautiful sweet peas that were growing on my fence. :evil:
"Isn't it enough to see that a garden is beautiful without having to believe that there are fairies at the bottom of it too?" - Douglas Adams

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Ozark Lady
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A roll of the plastic that is used when making a greenhouse would probably be the cheapest and easiest thing to line your side of the fence with.
I think you need to protect the entire length of the fence. It is bad, but you surely don't want it to happen again. With any chance of recovery, you can't let them get you again, or in other areas.

So sad, and your yard is so pretty and productive.
Last edited by Ozark Lady on Wed Apr 21, 2010 6:10 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Talk to your plants.... If your plants talk to you... Run!

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rainbowgardener
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Oh jeez..... wow, what can I say. Since I grow all those native plants too and cherish them, I can imagine how heartbreaking and frustrating that is.

Don't have much to add to all of the above, but I agree with OL, don't be too quick to pull things. Since they presumably didn't get any direct spray, just drift, a lot of things may be set back and lose current foliage but come back from the roots.

I don't know whether I would be crying or fuming, but probably some of both! It's hard to deal with the neighbors about it when they are denying they did it; just makes it worse. Least they could do would be to 'fess up and apologize.
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applestar
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Thanks everyone. :) It really helps to know that you all understand what I'm going through. :shock: :evil: :cry: :?

Since the fence is the neighbor's, technically I can't put anything on it... BUT DH has been wanting to install our own fence flat up against theirs. I've been protesting that the idea is absurd, and even if we DO put up this fence-against-fence, we'd continue with our 5' picket fence rather than a solid 6' fence that he wants....

Well, I think I changed my mind.... :x

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Ozark Lady
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Oh definitely I would fence it really well.

I think this is a wake-up call to all of us.

Go look, where is your garden and flower beds at risk? What can you do to protect them, and yourself?

It's kind of fitting that herbicide is called "roundup". Like in the old west.

I feel like I am a rancher in the old west and trying to defend against rustlers. But in this case, my livestock is plants and insects, and they are spraying poison instead of bullets or arrows. Where is Matt Dillon when you need him?

You can have bees tested to see if your neighbor poisoned them, I wonder if there is any protection for plants? To prove who done it?
Talk to your plants.... If your plants talk to you... Run!

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tomf
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It may be to late to trim the leaves off the plants but you could try.

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Kisal
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I'd make very sure of the property line, before I installed a fence "flat up against" someone else's. Perhaps it only applies to Oregon, but here, people install their fences at least 6" on their own side of the line. The reason is that, if a fence is right on the property line, then it belongs equally to the owners of both abutting properties. You would have to get permission from the other owner if the fence ever needed maintenance, and if the other owner wanted to, he/she could deny you the right to touch the fence. Just something to check before you build. :)
"Isn't it enough to see that a garden is beautiful without having to believe that there are fairies at the bottom of it too?" - Douglas Adams

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Ozark Lady
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Yep, same in Arkansas, I wondered how the fence could only belong to the neighbor.
Here if it is on the property line, it belongs to both, no matter who built it or paid for it.
You might check the laws and find that you do in fact own half that fence, and they are hoodwinking you that they own it.
If you own it too, then sure, nail tin, or plasic or whatever it takes on your side to protect your plants.
Talk to your plants.... If your plants talk to you... Run!

Susan W
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Very sad story. This is especially sorry as your plants are not common and have been babied. (unlike common ones easily re-planted).

Have you dug away some of the dirt and put in fresh? Washed the plants well?
Let us know how this resolves, well if some plants pull through.
Have fun!
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tedln
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I truly sympathize with you Applestar. I know how you value your native plants. Each one is like a garden child.

My son's neighbor had his son paint his fence with a power sprayer with brown stain last week. Surprise, Surprise, Surprise; My son's swimming pool, patio furniture, limestone skirting around the pool, outdoor cooking center and flower garden are now covered with brown oily stain. The neighbor tried to deny his responsibility, but his fence was the only one with a brand new coat of stain.

Ted
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Kisal
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Ha! I once had a neighbor who sent her son out to rototill a garden for her. The kid wasn't paying attention and ran the tiller right across the property line, digging up my entire tulip bed ... and the tulips were in bloom! I was absolutely enraged! :twisted: :twisted: :twisted:
"Isn't it enough to see that a garden is beautiful without having to believe that there are fairies at the bottom of it too?" - Douglas Adams

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One2ManyHobbies
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My gosh, these are horror stories! All of your anguish makes me feel better about the huge loud dogs to one side and kids on the other side who won't stay out of my back yard. They break the fence down to get their balls or what-not out of my yard. But the brown stain everywhere would be horrible. People really just don't care about others anymore. What's worse is that in today's world no one takes responsibility for their actions anymore either. They've learned that, under the eyes of the law, if no one saw me do it then I didn't do anything.
"So much time and so little to do! Strike that, reverse it." - If you don't know who said this quote, shame on you. For those who are shamed, Willy Wonka.

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gixxerific
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Just saw this Apple I'm so sorry I know how much love and care you put into your garden.:(

I'm thinking a few things to do that wouldn't be prudent to talk about on this site. One involves a baseball bat, everyone loves baseball don't they. :twisted:

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applestar
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Thanks, Gixx. :D
The good news is that the Crested Iris that were all in bud have managed to all bloom. Not sure if it was less susceptible compared to other broadleaved plants. The Tiarella flower stalks are starting to lift their heads again, too, and the native azaleas, including my favorite orange sherbert colored ones are starting to bloom. So there's hope. Maybe the compost soak water helped.

Funny thing: There are tons and tons of Jewelweed seedlings there -- a carpet of them. I was getting ready to pull most of them out and put them in the compost, leaving only a selected few. So you can guess that aside from loss to my compost GREENS, I wouldn't have minded if a good % of these seedlings bit the dust if anything had to go. Well, guess what's going strong with no visible sign of distress? :roll: -- I guess it's the hydrophobic leaf surface which beads water into glittering jewels that saved them. The most unwelcome English Ivy shoots that keep creeping in from THEIR side of the fence show no sign of wilting either. :x

The trouble is now, I can't/don't want to casually pull the weeds with my bare hands, not knowing what might be on them, and I don't think I want to put them in the compost pile either. :? And so my sense of :mrgreen: is doubly, no triply offended because now I'll have to put them out with the garbage. :evil:

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gixxerific
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Or you could pull them and throw them back into your neighbors yard. Not like I have ever done that or anything. :wink:

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tomf
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If the spray they used only made the ivy sick and it came back and did not kill it then most likely they used some thing like Round up, to kill ivy a woody plant you use Crossbow or a woody plant killer or a mix of round up and Crossbow. The woody plant killer stays longer in the soil.

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applestar
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Well, Ozark Lady, here's MY "lemonade". :D

I let all those Jewelweed grow, and left the roped off area untended until today. Since then, the neighbor has stained his side of the fence -- As he worked, he draped a canvas tarp over the fence on my side to keep the spray on his side - so he *is* listening -- and probably sprayed other stuff as well, but the Jewelweed, hopefully provided a modicum of protection over the area.

Everyone else seems to be getting rain, but we're in a midst of a drought (a good thundershower rolled along the horizon yesterday, close enough to set off the Lightening Detector in the nearby athletic fields, yet we only got a teaser of a sprinkle).

In the last two days, the Jewelweed started to droop, and I knew it was time. 8) Today, I was armed with my hand sickle but the hollow stem and base of the Jewelweeds easily broke off at ground level. I bagged them all. One 2 cu.ft. bag and one 0.5 cu.ft. bag -- both overstuffed, so at least 3 cu.ft., maybe more like 3.5, of biomass, that hopefully accumulated and sequestered all the bad stuff -- Bio-remediation, my style. :wink:

I watered the area well, though we're *supposed to* get some rain tonight. Will get some AACT brewing to restore the area. Having to remove all that biomass (which should have been cut and left as mulch) probably means a pretty hefty nutrient loss. :?

Jewelweed carpeting the area:
[img]https://i290.photobucket.com/albums/ll272/applesbucket/Image7029.jpg[/img]

Base of Jewelweed:
[img]https://i290.photobucket.com/albums/ll272/applesbucket/Image7035.jpg[/img]

1/2 of the Shade Garden cleared of Jewelweed:
[img]https://i290.photobucket.com/albums/ll272/applesbucket/Image7031.jpg[/img]

All clear! :()
[img]https://i290.photobucket.com/albums/ll272/applesbucket/Image7039.jpg[/img]

Straight into the trash!
[img]https://i290.photobucket.com/albums/ll272/applesbucket/Image7038.jpg[/img]

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