plantlover
Newly Registered
Posts: 9
Joined: Sat Dec 02, 2006 3:20 pm
Location: Barcelona, Spain

Can you help me identifying this plant???

Hello,

I have this plant but I do not know its name. Up to now, I kept it inside but it is becoming bigger and I wonder if it can survive outside.

Can you please help me identifying it?
Thank you!
[img]https://img689.imageshack.us/img689/4692/img3433o.jpg[/img]
Last edited by plantlover on Wed Mar 24, 2010 1:46 pm, edited 1 time in total.

User avatar
applestar
Mod
Posts: 27796
Joined: Thu May 01, 2008 11:21 pm
Location: Zone 6, NJ (3/M)4/E ~ 10/M

Welcome to the forum! :D

We might be able to help with the ID if you give us some descriptions. A photo or two -- a close up and an overall look -- would be even better. Look in the New to Helpful Gardener forum for guidelines and tips on how to post photos and on ways to post for better responses. :wink:

thanrose
Greener Thumb
Posts: 720
Joined: Fri Oct 16, 2009 2:01 pm
Location: Jacksonville, FLZone 9A

I'm thinking this might be Pandanus utilis or screw pine. The pine refers to the fruit. If it is, the leaves will have tiny red teeth on the edges. More mature plants will send out roots from the lower stem so that it looks like pencils or chopsticks helping to hold it up.

It could be a number of things, but that's my best guess from this photo.

User avatar
applestar
Mod
Posts: 27796
Joined: Thu May 01, 2008 11:21 pm
Location: Zone 6, NJ (3/M)4/E ~ 10/M

Hmm. The leaves look serrated until you enlarge the photo by clicking on it.

Doesn't this REALLY look like a Yucca plant? (I see that some common names for Yucca include Spanish Dagger and Spanish Bayonet 8))
The one I have is hardy outdoors here (and winter lows can get as low as -5ºF), but there are a number of different species, I believe, so I can't say if yours would be. How cold does it get in your garden? Oh! It'll also depend on whether it's in the ground or potted as potted roots can freeze without protection.

If the hardiness of your plant is borderline in your area, and you decide to grow it outside, it would be best to plant it in the ground this spring so the plant will have plenty of time to establish roots. You could provide additional protection in the winter with good mulch and perhaps a burlap wrap.

User avatar
Kisal
Mod Emeritus
Posts: 7648
Joined: Tue Jun 24, 2008 5:04 am
Location: Oregon

I agree with Applestar's suggestion. It looks like a yucca to me. I had one in my backyard for awhile, until it bloomed. I discovered then that I am very allergic to the pollen, so I dug it up. (The root system, which as I recall was made up of large tubers, took me a couple of years to completely eradicate.)

You can find quite a bit of information about yucca here:

https://www.bennyskaktus.dk/Yucca_UK.htm
"Isn't it enough to see that a garden is beautiful without having to believe that there are fairies at the bottom of it too?" - Douglas Adams

plantlover
Newly Registered
Posts: 9
Joined: Sat Dec 02, 2006 3:20 pm
Location: Barcelona, Spain

I believe you are right, it is a yucca

Thank you, I think you are right, it is a YUCCA.
I have just spent a few hours trying to find out which one it is but I was not successful...

I got this plant in Barcelona, Spain and it would stay on my terrasse. I now went back home in France and the area where I live is an oceanic climate. Mild and humid. However, this winter temperatures went down to 14 degres farenheit.
Shall I plant it or put it in a bigger pot?

plantlover
Newly Registered
Posts: 9
Joined: Sat Dec 02, 2006 3:20 pm
Location: Barcelona, Spain

Thank you Kisal for sending me to Benny's website. After a few hours trying to identify which yucca was mine, I gave up and sent an email to Benny who informed me that my plant was not a yucca but a Dracaena.

I was wondering if any of you had any experience planting that kind of plant outside... Or if it is exclusively an interior plant in most parts of the world. Thank you for sharing if you have some experience.

Return to “What Doesn't Fit Elsewhere”