User avatar
rainbowgardener
Super Green Thumb
Posts: 25303
Joined: Sun Feb 15, 2009 11:04 pm
Location: TN/GA 7b

end of season

We haven't had a frost yet and the yard still looks pretty nice with asters, mums, jerusalum artichokes, fall crocuses, white snakeroot, goldenrod blooming. Also annual and perennial salvia, sweet alyssum, obedient plant, a last few blooms on the honeysuckle trumpet vines. And in containers impatiens, petunias, marigolds, scaveola, ageratum..

We still ate fresh from the CSA farm corn last night, but it will be the last. I'm eating tomatoes from my plants, but they are ones I picked green and ripened indoors and they just aren't the same as vine ripened (but still better than store bought!). No more tomatoes are ripening outside.

Couple days ago, I brought in my last four green peppers. Peppers did very well this year with all the rain. These were still green, but huge and thick walled, very crisp and crunchy, juicy and flavorful. But they are the last. There's still babies and buds out there, but too cold for them to do anything.

I brought in herbs to dry. So far I have oregano, mint, lemon balm stripped from the stems and jarred up and lavender, sage, basil still hanging to dry. Today I will bring in the parsley and jar up the sage. I love working with the herbs, immersed in the scent and I love having my neatly labelled jars of homegrown herbs and teas, but no more going out to the garden to pick fresh leaves to cook with. :(

Bittersweet joys of fall harvest!

User avatar
hendi_alex
Super Green Thumb
Posts: 3567
Joined: Sun Jul 06, 2008 11:58 am
Location: Central Sand Hills South Carolina

Why preserve parsley? I grow mine year round, though its production slows a bit during the winter. We got down to the single digits last year and the parsley didn't seem to mind. Why not put some in planters, perhaps bring them inside during the coldest periods and enjoy fresh parsley year round.
Last edited by hendi_alex on Thu Oct 15, 2009 1:35 am, edited 1 time in total.
Eclectic gardening style, drawing from 45 years of interest and experience. Mostly plant in raised beds and containers primarily using intensive gardening techniques.
Alex

User avatar
rainbowgardener
Super Green Thumb
Posts: 25303
Joined: Sun Feb 15, 2009 11:04 pm
Location: TN/GA 7b

Well I haven't really dried parsley before, but you can buy it that way in the store, so I thought I'd try. I'm just doing it like all the others, rubber band a bunch and hang it upside down, inside a paper bag. We'll see what happens. I didn't dig the plants, they are still outside, I just clipped all the big leaves. So if the plants keep going so much the better. I'm running out of room to bring more stuff inside, where they would have any sunlight. My two best window corners both look like jungles!

Everytime I go out I notice a few more things still blooming: pinks, veronica, statice, sedum....

User avatar
rainbowgardener
Super Green Thumb
Posts: 25303
Joined: Sun Feb 15, 2009 11:04 pm
Location: TN/GA 7b

Bit the bullet and pulled out the green pepper plants, it was purely wishful thinking to leave them... Pulled the last basil plant that was in the bed with them (others are already indoors drying) and potted it up, to try to keep some live basil growing through the winter.

Laid down some compost and covered the bed with my homemade wood chips (running trimmed brush through a chipper), because I don't have any leaves yet... First bed all tucked up for winter :) :(
Last edited by rainbowgardener on Tue Oct 13, 2009 12:04 am, edited 1 time in total.

User avatar
applestar
Mod
Posts: 27900
Joined: Thu May 01, 2008 11:21 pm
Location: Zone 6, NJ (3/M)4/E ~ 10/M

Hmm. I should probably give it up but I have mine covered with floating covers....

Ouch. Just checked the weather and the lows forecast for the next 5 days has changed from mid-40's to upper 30's and low 40's. I guess I know what I'll be doing tomorrow. :roll:

The Helpful Gardener
Mod
Posts: 7493
Joined: Tue Feb 10, 2004 2:17 am
Location: Colchester, CT

We Northeastern types are all in wrapping up mode; I have been making hotsauce like crazy (two different ones so far with a third slated for tomorrow; you ain't kidding about a good year for peppers 8) ), pulling dying vines and plants, and harvesting things like brussel sprouts. Houseplants are in (in the thirties here tonight) and the frost is on the pumpkin (what few there are; I hear there is a shortage this year. One of the first crops hit by a lack of bee's?...they said it would be... :( )

HG
Scott Reil

User avatar
Sharon Marie
Senior Member
Posts: 167
Joined: Tue Mar 03, 2009 12:25 am
Location: Jeffersonville, IN

I planted loads of bee loving plants this year. Tons of coneflowers! I have them on all sides of the house now (except for 1 where the roses are) I am an avid bee person. My uncle is a bee keeper.
[img]https://i168.photobucket.com/albums/u177/sharontrobaugh/amuel2.jpg[/img]
His name is Amuel Sheckles and he lives part time here and part time in Mississippi. I think he is awesome!!
Reduce - Reuse - Recycle.
Zone 6A - Jeffersonville, Indiana

The Helpful Gardener
Mod
Posts: 7493
Joined: Tue Feb 10, 2004 2:17 am
Location: Colchester, CT

Don't try this at home, folks! :lol:

HG
Scott Reil

User avatar
gixxerific
Super Green Thumb
Posts: 5889
Joined: Fri Jun 26, 2009 9:42 pm
Location: Wentzville, MO (Just West oF St. Louis) Zone 5B

Amuel looks a cool fellow. He really needs to shave that beard. :lol:

The Helpful Gardener
Mod
Posts: 7493
Joined: Tue Feb 10, 2004 2:17 am
Location: Colchester, CT

Warmed back up enough to divide a few hardy native type perennials... cut back some of the dressier borders (the native borders remain rampant and in disarray, but the seeds are still getting worked over and I like to let the critters have their way in that part of the yard). I will start cutting and dehydrating herbs tomorrow, moving the big rosemary back in a pot for a winter in the garage. (throw some snow or a tray of ice cubes on and it waters itself when it warms up enough, and just enough too). Getting ready to button up good, but brussel sprouts are still coming in...

HG
Scott Reil

User avatar
rainbowgardener
Super Green Thumb
Posts: 25303
Joined: Sun Feb 15, 2009 11:04 pm
Location: TN/GA 7b

end of season DINNER

Had one of the last garden/local grown dinners tonight:

Salad-- lettuce from my garden, spinach from the local CSA farm, my window sill ripened tomatoes

Delicata squash-- the six delicatas I got from volunteer vines, prepared with the last tomato from the CSA, basil from my garden

Bean cheesy chard (recipe from Recipes for a Small Planet, absolutely one of my favorite recipes)-- chard from my garden, onions and garlic from CSA.

Nice dinner, but so sad that it's almost over. I still have chard and lettuce in my garden (until we get a really hard freeze) tomatoes on the windowsill, and a drawer full of potatoes plus a few onions, garlic, & winter squash from the CSA. Once that is gone, no more locally grown; we had our last pickup last weekend.

User avatar
applestar
Mod
Posts: 27900
Joined: Thu May 01, 2008 11:21 pm
Location: Zone 6, NJ (3/M)4/E ~ 10/M

I discovered a B. sprout plant under all that Edamame. It's still kinda small (about 12" tall). I'm seriously thinking of putting a tomato cage around it and wrapping it in plastic to keep it going.... :wink:

How about you, rainbow? Put up a cold frame around your lettuce and chards -- keep'em going until Thanksgiving?

User avatar
rainbowgardener
Super Green Thumb
Posts: 25303
Joined: Sun Feb 15, 2009 11:04 pm
Location: TN/GA 7b

Well, I don't know if I will get it together to do a real cold frame, but they are all in one raised bed. I can easily put up the wire hoops and some clear plastic, see how long they last... thanks for the little push!

Return to “What Doesn't Fit Elsewhere”