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applestar
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My turn to ask for ID :)

Both of these are in my Veg garden:

Pretty blue flowers. I thought it might be arugula but the leaves along the flower stem has no flavor. I'll get a photo of basal leaf structure later if needed. In case anyone's curious, the stalk/buds next to it are bolted Deer Tongue lettuce, and the little white ones are probably radish.
[img]https://i290.photobucket.com/albums/ll272/applesbucket/Image4535.jpg[/img]

This one started growing in the Veg bed last year. It's grown bigger this year but no sign of flowering so it's obviously a perennial.
[img]https://i290.photobucket.com/albums/ll272/applesbucket/Image4554.jpg[/img]

wingdesigner
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Do you like coffee? Looks like chicory to me. Some call it bachelor's button or cornflower? I say chicory. (or maybe chickory--sp?) Hurts like a sonofagun when it comes flying out from under the mower.

Geez, Applestar, I can't believe YOU don't know something. That's almost as bad as Cynthia H closing her Sunset book and using another reference...

Or HG giving up organic gardening...

Well, you get the idea. I'm leaving now before I get smacked. :hide:
Happy Gardening,
Wing

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applestar
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Thanks Wing! It DOES look like chicory. I wonder where it came from... among the straw used for mulch? But that means I probably ate some of the young leaves for salad thinking it was part of the 1 line of mesclun mix seeds I planted there! :lol:

I've always wanted chicory. Roots roasted for coffee sub, right? Don't know how many times I thought about stopping by the side of a country road to dig one up or collect seeds. This one's a keeper.

Can't know EVERYTHING, Wing. That'd be scary. But thanks! :wink: ... don't know why but Ellen DeGeneres as Dory saying "Nope! Nothin' in my noggin!" just ran through my mind. :lol:

--
BTW, I got excited thinking a catalog photo of hosta reminded me of the 2nd one, but now I see that this one looks like it has a solid, rounded and possibly even fuzzy leaf petiole and leathery looking leaves. Hmm. WHAT can it be?

When it first appeared, I thought it might be Echinacea, because the leaves were narrower, but the leaf petiole is wrong, and this year, the leaves have become much broader. The larger leaf is about 6" long.

wingdesigner
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:lol: I gotta start wearing my glasses more often. I thought the second photo was of the basal rosette of the chicory; thus I wasn't positive about guessing it. I was thinkin' to myself: Hmm, I don't remember chicory leaves looking like that... :roll:
You must have picked the leaves when they were young because they get bitter quickly. Have no idea about the coffee thing--I'm a tea drinker. But I vaguely remembered reading somewhere that there was a connection between chicory and coffee. I think you can make a blue dye out of the flowers? Chicory is a "weed" here and pops up everywhere, so I'm thinking the seeds really carry. However, if I had to choose between chicory and mustard garlic, I'd choose the former.
Happy Gardening,
Wing

cynthia_h
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It's a Southern thing, so far as I know...the chicory/coffee thing, anyway.

There's a brand (or at least used to be...) called Lusianne coffee which contains some chicory root. The use of chicory vs. coffee got a national boost during World War II due to rationing, although it was a known substitute for much longer. My mother, born in Texas to a Texas-born mother, and then raised in Texas and Florida, always called it "Lousy Anne" coffee. I wasn't a coffee drinker until 1992, in California, so I can't describe Lusianne coffee from personal experience.

The roots of several plants (including dandelion) are reputed to make a good hot drink when the roots have been prepared by being peeled, chopped, and roasted at a low temp, then stored to retain their dehydrated state.

I grew chicory and pulled it out a few weeks ago, but alas my energy for that day and the next few was gone gone gone and the roots dried w/o being peeled. :( Now I'll need to wait another year to try the experiment. :( :(

At least the roots will help in the compost heap. *sigh*

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applestar
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The 2nd photo plant is back, more vigorous than before. I think I'm also seeing more of them elsewhere in the garden. No flowers last year.
Here's an update photo:
[img]https://i290.photobucket.com/albums/ll272/applesbucket/Image6666.jpg[/img]

Any ideas :?:

Also, here's a new one. Started to grow in the middle of my Nodding Onion (Allium cernuum) :x
[img]https://i290.photobucket.com/albums/ll272/applesbucket/Image6664.jpg[/img]

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applestar
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:?: Any ideas? :?:

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Kisal
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That second picture looks like it might be a fernleaf bleeding heart. If it popped up in my yard, I'd sure baby it along and give it a chance to bloom, even if it took a couple of years. :)
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rainbowgardener
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those leaves (in with the onions) also look a lot like my woods poppy leaves.

The other one looks like black-eyed susan leaves. Maybe something related?
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applestar
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Thanks! Maybe they'll flower this year. :D

My MIL gave me seeds from her Bleeding heart which I think is Dicentra eximia and I scattered them around, so it's very possible this is one of them. There *was* another one growing in the Native Shade Garden... :(

That plant in the veg garden had better be WORTH IT. I'll be planting one less sweet pepper in that bed because of it... :x :lol:

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Kisal
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*sigh* I've wanted some bleeding heart for so long! If that's what the plant turns out to be, I'd sure love to have a couple of seeds. :D
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applestar
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Sure! Let's hope it flowers soon! :wink:

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applestar
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It (2nd photo) flowered! :D I'm having camera upload problems again (I have to restart my computer to get it to work) but it appears to be a Wild Geranium like this one: https://www.illinoiswildflowers.info/woodland/plants/wild_geranium.htm

Since the Allium cernuum that this sprang from was purchased at Bowman's Hill nativie plant sale two years ago, I guess it's somewhat possible that there was a seed in there, and in my lackadaisical fashion, I didn't bother to weed it out last year if it had been growing among them. I guess when the spring planting craziness is over, I'll try to separate them so I can find a place for the geranium to colonize.

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rainbowgardener
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Be careful with it. The native wild geranium is kind of a weed on my property, ie a pretty aggressive spreader.
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applestar
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Oh! Thanks! I'll pick a spot where it WON'T be too comfortable then. :wink:

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My turn to ask for ID

:) I have a plant in my flower garden--I'm originally from England and hate the word "yard" --that looks like the one in your second photo--the one you gave us an update on. It has the same broad medium green leaf with pointed end. It is a Rudbeckia fulgida--a yellow daisy type flower with a dark brown center, almost like a cone flower. It flowers from summer to fall and the average size is 24x18 inches. It likes full sun and attracts butterflies. I put mine in last Fall, so they haven't bloomed yet. Fertilization is before new growth begins. Cold hardiness is -40 degrees. Remove spent flowers. Growth rate is fast. Water usage: Arid dry. Spacing: 18 inches. That's about all I can tell you about it. I'm hoping for a nice show of flowers this year. Have a great day! 8)

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applestar
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Thanks! Now we have 2 votes for Rudbeckia (Black-eyed Susan). Should they take 3 years to bloom though? The stems are starting to elongate, so I guess we'll know soon. 8)

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My turn to ask for ID

:cry: Gosh! I hope I don't have to wait three years for them to bloom. It didn't say anything about that on the tag that came with the plants.

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applestar
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This one that we're thinking *might* be Rudbeckia -- mine doesn't have serrated edges on the leaves and seems broader than typical unserrated Rudbeckia....

I came across a picture for Comfrey. Could it possibly be Comfrey? I'm trying to think if I planted anything from my favorite Herb Lady where these are growing because I know she sells Russian Comfrey.... Could Comfrey root survive in the compost pile and emerge? Does it have fruit or seed that birds eat? Reason I ask is roots in compost or another plant could explain its presence in the veg garden but not the 3 or 4 others growing under the Plum tree.

Wow, if it IS Comfrey, I could be in serious trouble getting rid of the one in the veg garden! :o

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I'm trying to follow the photos and I think I'm a little confused as to what you all are talking about - lol!

One photo is definately a perennial geranium. The do spread on their own.

I'm not convinced the other is a Rudbeckia. If it is, it should bloom this year.

I don't live far from Bowman's Hill - love it there!

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applestar
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I KNOW I'm being impatient -- just should wait for them to flower... :wink:

Latest photo -- see how much of the raised bed it's taking up?
[img]https://i290.photobucket.com/albums/ll272/applesbucket/Image6925.jpg[/img]

Others around the soon-to-be-gone plum tree, looking like I might have planted them intentionally 8)
[img]https://i290.photobucket.com/albums/ll272/applesbucket/Image6956.jpg[/img]

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Does it have a sandpaper feel to the leaf?

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applestar
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INteresting question! I don't think so... but I don't really want to go outside to check. Is it raining there as well? :wink:

LilianMorris
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My turn to ask for ID

:flower: We are all holding our breath, waiting to find out what this plant of yours is. Be sure and post a picture when it flowers. :)

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The leaf looks a lot like a Rudbeckia but the shape of the plant does not. My Rudbeckia have a sandpaper feel to the leaves, which is probably why the deer leave them alone. I can't wait for yours to bloom and tell us what it really is. A member of the cone family? - it has more of that type of shape.

I had rain yesterday, too. I"m glad, I moved some plants over the weekend and the rain was appreciated.

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Joe-Pye Weed? Are they connected by runners underground?
Happy Gardening,
Wing

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rainbowgardener
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I don't think so on the Joe-Pye Weed. Here's a couple pix of mine that I just ran out and took :) :

[img]https://i602.photobucket.com/albums/tt102/rainbowgardener/joepye5-20.jpg[/img]

[img]https://i602.photobucket.com/albums/tt102/rainbowgardener/joepye2.jpg[/img]

The leaves are very serrated around the edges and and the stems have little reddish brown dots/ lines all over them. They are more than 3' high already. I tie them to the post behind them once they bloom -- at that point they are 6-7 feet tall and top heavy with the huge blooms and tend to lean over too much.
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applestar
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This is turning out to be a TOTALLY useless weed! (well, except as mulch and compost GREENS :twisted:)
It produced these teeny, tiny white flowers:
[img]https://i290.photobucket.com/albums/ll272/applesbucket/Image7363.jpg[/img]

I STILL don't recognize it. Anyone else? :?:

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rainbowgardener
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It's looking familiar to me, but I can't get it

Deadly nightshade makes little white flowers at the top of the plant like that:

https://jaw.iinet.net.au/pembee/deadly_nightshade.jpg

but I think the leaves aren't right.
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Yes the second plant looks like wild bleeding hart, Ddog I have tons of it growing wild, it loves to grow in part shade by the trees but I see it in full sun some times. It has lovely small hart shaped flowers.

[img]https://i37.photobucket.com/albums/e57/twistedtomf/_DSC0109-1.jpg[/img]

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Do you get a minty smell when you crush leaves?

HG
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applestar
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Huh. I don't know. Partly because the one in the garden, I have to push past an overgrown borage to be anywhere near it so I'm more aware of the cucumber-y smell. Then there's a sweet clover on the other side of the path and a lemon balm at the end.... :roll: :wink:

I'll check in the morning. It doesn't have a square stem though.

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applestar
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Nope no minty smell, just green....

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One down...

still stumped... :?

HG
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applestar
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Oh, no! Et tu?

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Rainbow, I reluctantly disagree with the pix you sent--the nightshade in my yard has purple/yellow flowers and is more of a vine, easily broken when pulled, and stinks. It makes green berries that mature to red, and flowers along the axils. It doesn't stand upright at all past about 6", then flops over and roots wherever it touches. The leaves are more like an old-fashioned tomatoe leaf, almost compound.

Applestar, if you don't like it, then get rid of it now, before it takes over any more real estate!

That's my 2 cents.
Happy Gardening,
Wing

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Kisal
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I think RBG got it right. Applestar's plant does look like one of the "deadly nightshades" ... Eastern Black Nightshade (Solanum ptycanthum), to be exact. It has white flowers and bears black berries.

The problem is that "deadly nightshade" is a common name and is used for at least 3 different species of plants, and possibly more. I have the same species Wing has, which has purple and yellow flowers and bears red berries. It's a vine with the scientific name is Solanum dulcamara. Unfortunately, this plant is also sometimes called Black Nightshade. :roll:

The scientific name for the third species is Atropa belladonna, also commonly known as just Belladonna. This plant has purple flowers, but bears black berries.
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wingdesigner
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Oh, so...no confusion there. :roll: Thanks Kisal. Of course there are duplications in the botanical world--redundant systems, if you will.

Like poison ivy for instance. Just talked with a neighbour who warned me it has shown up in his yard, bordering his other neighbour. He found out the hard way. Fortunately he does wear gloves and got most of it washed off, but there's still a few "reminders". Great, first varmints, then garlic mustard, now poison ivy.

Sigh.
Happy Gardening,
Wing

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