Mini
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Posts: 15
Joined: Mon Jun 01, 2009 3:15 pm
Location: new forest

under ground wall

Hi,

I have had to remove a few cherry tree roots. In doing so I had so I dug a trench. Anyhow just as I was fillling in the trench I noticed a wall at one end. Obviously I then had to dig a bit further. It seems to consist of cream bricks, is very straight . I am not sure how deep or long it is.

I really want to uncover it and see what it is, but fear doing so will cause further distress to my neighbour's wretched cherry tree.

Is there a way to dig around tree roots and not harm them further? Or will excavating the wall harm them just because the roots will be exposed?

The wretched tree has already had its owner dig a swimming pool well within the root spread, and had me removing four 2" to 3" roots. I have left a deeper very soft one for now. But it will need to be removed. I intend to sever that root right up as close to hte garage as possible. We also want some major pruning done this year, removing anything hanging over our property, especially that which canopies our garage roof.

I know leaving the walls secrets hidden in the ground will be really hard! :roll:

Mini
new gardener alert,
any tips and hints welcome.

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Kisal
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Posts: 7648
Joined: Tue Jun 24, 2008 5:04 am
Location: Oregon

Why not fill in the trench for now, and then go to the library or public records office and research past ownership/usage of your property? Archaeologists routinely fill in the trenches they dig. They're easy enough to re-dig if historical research indicates the "find" is of any real interest. (I seriously doubt the cream-colored bricks are prehistoric. :wink: ) JMO! :)
"Isn't it enough to see that a garden is beautiful without having to believe that there are fairies at the bottom of it too?" - Douglas Adams

Mini
Full Member
Posts: 15
Joined: Mon Jun 01, 2009 3:15 pm
Location: new forest

I think time constraints and the state of the tree mean I have no choice, but to fill it in.

There is no history of planning permission for the property (that goes back to 1947, but would not included foundations for sheds). Locals I have chatted too cannot remember anything being there in the past 70 years. Apparently 100 years ago the back garden was part of an orchard, but the soil is very very stoney, so I'm not sure about that.

I do know in the past 60 years it has been a fish and grocers shop, an antques shop, a car wash, and a bikers cafe, and recently just a home! All with the owners living on site using the back garden as a garden.

Now I am trying to research if the house ever put in an air raid shelter during the second world war. There would have reason to because the area was sometimes lit up as a decoy for southampton and there was a port and RAF airfield within a 10 mile raduis.

I think I might get my mum to run over the area with her metal dectector too.
Curiosity is a terrible thing, isn't it?

Mini
new gardener alert,
any tips and hints welcome.

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Kisal
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Posts: 7648
Joined: Tue Jun 24, 2008 5:04 am
Location: Oregon

I love archaeology, and find it endlessly fascinating! Could you take a sample of the brick, before you fill in the trench? It might be possible for someone at a university to run tests of part of the sample, to determine its age or the method of production. If you learn anything more, please share with us! :D
"Isn't it enough to see that a garden is beautiful without having to believe that there are fairies at the bottom of it too?" - Douglas Adams

Mini
Full Member
Posts: 15
Joined: Mon Jun 01, 2009 3:15 pm
Location: new forest

I love history, I majored in it at uni. The bricks are pretty average in size but a very pale colour. They are not fired in the same way as modern bricks though. These are much more clay like. 30 miles north west of us is a mansion built of chalk. That is far whiter than my wall, but the texture is similar.

I want to go and dig it out but the sewiing maachine and dance outfits are screaming for my attention. :roll:

Mini
new gardener alert,
any tips and hints welcome.

User avatar
Kisal
Mod Emeritus
Posts: 7648
Joined: Tue Jun 24, 2008 5:04 am
Location: Oregon

:lol: :lol:

My sewing machine is screaming at me to finish the new bathroom curtains and the tiebacks for the kitchen curtains! Before I can finish the bathroom curtains, though, I have to finish making the new curtain rod. :roll:
"Isn't it enough to see that a garden is beautiful without having to believe that there are fairies at the bottom of it too?" - Douglas Adams

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