kdodds
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You must be pretty far south as I'm right on the NY/NJ border and in zone 4/5. Anyway, I'm fairly certain that Crape Myrtle will not grow well outdoors north of the Carolinas, but it does make a nice indoor plant. It's a VERY slow germinator though, potentially a year or more.

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The Nadina sounds interesting. I will have to look at that. Forgot to add- with the specs on the Maple, they said it is 5 years old (leaves are big and i read to prune doen to 2 or 3 leaves in a bunch and not let stems cross. founs a site just for these Maples also. so much overgrowth, they said prune, take a step back and prune and shape.) It also says the maple has 5 lobed, with fine toothed edged in a brilliant red color. The pictur has such small leaves and dimension and this bonsai has large leaves, a trunck with brancheches shooting up, but not those smaller leaves. so the 101 ways for bonsai book says all the leaves come off for winter for buds to grow, but do I take off everything and leave sticks?
BARBARA MARTIN

kdodds
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Nandina makesa beautiful bonsai, especially in clumps, but has to get pretty old before it starts to look tree-like.

On the maples, they should go dormant and drop leaves in the winter. I think what you're talking about is spring. Once the first leaves are in, you snip them off, leaving the petioles (stems). These will fall off and a new crop of smaller and more plentiful leaves will grow in their place. From what I understand, this should not be done every year, but rather every other year.

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:cry: Though my bonsai are doing great, pruned everybody. The gardenia i shaped...yes i took pictures, but i have to figure out the download. I even wired the Fukien tea in the new pot.

now i read if i prune the leaves of the Japanese Maple the same year as repotting, it is bad. i have been cutting leaves because iread how, but now that is wrong. i cut the big leaves at the stems, but some materials say to leave partial for new growth, some say to bare the tree altogether in the spring for new growth.

So will it now die now that i pruned the big leaves and i have smaller leaves coming out? It was bushy, but i pruned the leaves down, like i read to. Do I give up on this 5 year old tree? He has been ok. i keep the soil moist. Until the new pot comes, I give a little bit of liquid fertilizer and a lot of water and combine that with a little vitamins for strength because he does not have that pot and i did trim him down. But now i read not to feed. i have time released fertilizer for the new pot. this liquid is very, very diluted and not strong because it is supposed to be in a gallon of water and I do not mix 1 gallon. It is 4 plants, counting my seeds.

So i guess deep breath. I can order a new japanese maple cheap from the same Springhill nursery. It is cheap enough. Barb
BARBARA MARTIN

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:D I read to cut all the stems on the Maple by so many websites before i found this info of not to do both repot and prune....But being 5 years old helps. Well small leaves are still coming in and little buds by the trunk and when i repotted, i read to cut the bigger root, rather than the smaller roots and wire, which i did. then i watered and layered slow acting fertilizer it came with. I then used joebonsaie premium Bonsai Vitamins in a liquid formula. It is supposed to help the roots stimulate and has essential hormones and has Vitamin B1. So I mixed with water and did this because it looked wilty all around because I pruned the bigger leaves. This morning. The remaining leaves look revitalized and the leaf stem is straigt out and the plant seems happy. I read it is a she. But it seems she got that boost. so now the weather is better, so at least during the day, my Bonsais are out.

The gardenia has new leaves that are yellow coming out. It is odd. no flowers yet. Just one section. I did prune her down. found some info and I know she was was too bushy. I gave her some vitamins to. it says to use distilled water. Can i substitute purified heated water? I do not use cold water, only room temperature as it says. Cannot find the yellowing info. Barbara
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Barbara,

Root pruning is done to enable the tree to replaced in the same pot. The older thicker roots are removed as the fine roots are the ones that are responsible for gathering nutrients. There is another aspect to root pruning as well and that is aesthetics. Surface roots are preferred as opposed to downward pointing ones, this allows us to use shallow pots. A root system that emerges in a radial manner all at the same level is always to be encouraged. Here is an example of a Maple that is starting it's fifth summer. The thick surface roots near the trunk will eventually be exposed and become a design element. Fine roots are retained at the perimeter to feed the tree.
[url=https://img505.imageshack.us/my.php?image=maplerootsrx3.jpg][img]https://img505.imageshack.us/img505/967/maplerootsrx3.th.jpg[/img][/url]
Each time you re-pot is an opportunity to improve the roots of your tree.

Defoliating is not usually performed on young material, it is a refining technique. If your tree recovers from its recent ordeal I would not do any further work on it this year, instead allow it to recover and regain strength.

Norm

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Thank you for the crepe myrtle info!
BARBARA MARTIN

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Thanks norm. i spread out the roots and the info that was sent as well as info i have seen that matchches says that the type of root system has that huge thick one and the tiny ones that are around and not to touch them. they seemed pretty even so i did not touch them, reading they give food. I only cut the thick one down because it curled around the whole system. the original pot was very small and the new pot is very roomy, twice the size to spread out. but the big root was very tight around the poor tree, so i cut it according to this pamphlet, up to the other roots, so I took off about 2 inches, then gave vitamins, after layering it with this slow asting fertilizer. the leaves i left are getting taller and i do have buds growing and smaller ones coming up. i feel bad that information i read contradicted eachother. I made a folder, holding everything, but like, BluerRidgeBamboo.com says to prune the Maple leaf stalks. barbara
BARBARA MARTIN

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One quick thing .....my maple has a little green on the big leaf veins now. it just started coming out....i know it changes color, but it just is interesting to see. I bring all my bonsais in about 4:30 or 5pm because it still gets cool here in NJ right now. Should i bring in the Maple since she is the only outside tree, or depending on the weather and the temperature, start leaving her out at night. it still dips to the 30"s to 40"s, sometimes 50"s depending. so since she is in a new pot and is newly pruned, I am cautious. I will tell you. The vitamins daily sparks her up. She seems to get a little wilty in the sun, though she is watered and sprayed, but if i give her a little of the vitamins to the trunk and to the leaves, it sparks her up. it is a root stimulator as well, so maybe it still needs that a little. .... I do promise i will not prune anymore. Hands off. I just am bothere by the way the tree trunk is. It has 2 straight up tree trunks, even when the bushy leaves were there. So waiting for the new leaf stalks will be neat. I feel bad, there are other websites that say so many odd things, why do they not say a universal standard way...or are tharer different ways people can raise their bonsai? Barbara
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Barbara,
I feel bad, there are other websites that say so many odd things, why do they not say a universal standard way...or are tharer different ways people can raise their bonsai?
There are so many factors to take into consideration that no one source seems to cover everything. For deciduous trees the usual practice is to develop the trunk first, then the primary branches and only then the fine twigs. When the trunk is the size and shape you wish the branches that are present today are often cut off and regrown later. Similarly, until the branches are well underway ramification (the fine twigs) is postponed. When you are advised to pinch new growth this is skipping the first two stages or perhaps assuming they are already complete. So you can see that the focus in early development and the focus during refinement are not necessarily the same.

To make matters more confusing different strategies are employed for different species. The steps I outlined above are great for Elm or Zelkova since they back-bud very easily almost anywhere on the trunk. The strategy is slightly different for Maples since they have a strong tendency to back-bud only at the location of the previous nodes. And this technique is not at all appropriate for Pines, but that is another subject.

If you look closely at the bark of the Maple you will see rings where old leaves or shoots have been. These are known as nodes and the spaces between them are called internodes. Long internodes create issues for styling. Maples call for some special treatment to avoid this situation. This is where pinching comes into play.

The stage of development it is at now and your goals for the future all play into the strategy you should employ now. Without a picture of your tree, or a better description, it is difficult to give you any suggestions that's why I suggested you slow down until you learn a little more.

[url]https://www.evergreengardenworks.com/trunks.htm[/url]
[url]https://www.evergreengardenworks.com/japmaple.htm[/url]

Norm
Last edited by Gnome on Sun Apr 20, 2008 3:05 am, edited 1 time in total.

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Barbara,

In re-reading you previous post I feel I should note a few things.
She seems to get a little wilty in the sun, though she is watered and sprayed, but if I give her a little of the vitamins to the trunk and to the leaves, it sparks her up.
Japanese Maples, particularly red varieties, should be shielded from strong sun early in the season. In nature these grow in woodland conditions, meaning that they live in the shade of other taller trees. Strong sun and wind can cause leaf burn.
Should I bring in the Maple since she is the only outside tree, or depending on the weather and the temperature, start leaving her out at night. it still dips to the 30"s to 40"s, sometimes 50"s depending.
Unless temperatures take a rather extreme change you should have your Maple outside now. All of my temperate trees (and even the Ficus) are outside now. Only worry if you are going to have frost, I hope that is done for the year.
The vitamins daily sparks her up. She seems to get a little wilty in the sun, though she is watered and sprayed, but if I give her a little of the vitamins to the trunk and to the leaves, it sparks her up. it is a root stimulator as well, so maybe it still needs that a little.
I'm not entirely sure I understand what you are doing with the "vitamins" I have never heard of feeding through the trunk. I have heard of foliar feeding but I usually don't practice this. The roots of your tree have evolved as the primary avenue of its acquiring what it needs.

Get your tree in dappled shade, if there is any yet, or otherwise shade it more. Maintain even moisture and feed periodically. I fertilize about every 10 to 14 days. Since you have included timed release fertilizer in your mix you could stretch it a bit more.

I recently acquired the volume "Bonsai with Japanese Maples" by Peter Adams. It is excellent and Amazon has it reduced from $35.00 to $23.00


Norm

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Sprinhill nursery included a time release fertillizer, which is white solid, that they said to put in the soil when replanting for 3 months, then again, " Bonsai Food 3- 1- 4 Mix 1/2 packet (1 TBSP) of Bondsai Food in potting mix when transplanting your bonsai Tree. Three months later add the remainder of the packet to the surface of the potting mix and gently scratch the food unto potting mix."

So, the soiil is "organic (derived by peat, forest products, or compost), sphaghnum peat moss, horticulture vermiculite, horticultural perlite, a wetting agent, and limestone."

So, i do not know. I was scared to put the maple outside. I know you need a picture. With the finished pruning now, and the now changing laves, I will send this. i have to get my husband to download all of the pictures to disk, so I can get this to you. I do not think i can do this by camera.

I guess I should do plain water for the maple then, since this fertilizer is there and put her outside. It is overcast, In the 40's with no frost anymore. Strange. just to have her out all the time. I am putting the Gardenia and Fukien Tea out in the day and in at night right now still thogh. The temps are still a little cool and they are house plants. The gardenia is getting more green now!
BARBARA MARTIN

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:( I mentioned everyday just about, since I recieved the Gardenia, I have seen 1 black bug... well I am seeing a whole bunch of aphids this mornign during my 3rd day watering. so it is time to get bug spray...i think i will spray all 3 because they hang out together and get watered together and the aphids flew around all 3 of them. the seeds are safe. barb. p.s. maybe that explains the problem with the yellowing leaves. my sis ordered it from proflowers, so it is ok.
BARBARA MARTIN

kdodds
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I'm pretty sure aphids don't fly. Are you sure they're not something else, like gnats maybe?

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They don"t? I have no idea...i just know when i first git this< I had an odd little black small bug fly from the plant and I killed it. When i looked in my plant book, it looked like the Aphids, but I did not know they do not fly. So Maybe I do not have a bug problem? On Japanese Maples....with my pruning, I have to wait a while before i see the fullness I pruned before, right. They are slow growers. I know I read that they are not supposed to be too top heavy but I was not looking at pruning from bottom up. The green coloring on the stems is funny It is a consistent green with spring colors, not mottled around thee leaf. i will take a close up with the digital to show this.
BARBARA MARTIN

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I did some more research and it does not match aphids, but I think i have black flies. and that is bad. That is what I think killed my Fukien tea in the past also. So I read to use either insectiside or even soapy water, but i cannot even tell where the eggs are. i think in the soil, like when i fir st got it. barb
BARBARA MARTIN

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:D So, my sister called Pro Flowers and they had someone else complain of the exact problems I have with my Gardenia, so I get a free replacement. I will still try to get an insecticide to see if I can save this one though. barb
BARBARA MARTIN

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:D well, good thing i am working on my memory and observations with therapy again because went back to the whatcom seed site and the Crape Myrtle is Zone 7-10, so yes, I can get it. It comes with 50 seeds. I am a nut, but I have time to wait. Being on disability with children in school and a hobby like this to nurture is a good thing for me.

I also found out the Springhill Nursery where i got my japanese Maple has a lifetime guarantee. they even said if these bugs spread to the maple, though the maple was healthy when i got it, they will still replace it free for a lifetime. Outrageous!!! They only have Jpanese Maples and Junipers, but it is worth it for a lifetime guarantee and if you by the tree single it is $19..You buy it with the new pot and training kit it is $29. Same with the Juniper. Awesome. Barb
BARBARA MARTIN

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Ok, so i got the Gardenia quickly today and though it was not out of the pot, it still has 50% of the leaves either yellow and green or new leaves yellow. So my sis will get a refund basically.
BARBARA MARTIN

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:( The new Gardenia had a bug on it this morning,but started getting more green with the plant food I gave it. And my Fukien Tea is now blooming. I have to get pictures!!!!!!!!!!!! My Maple has White dreis residue, i think maybe salt on the pot and leaves. It is flourishing, but has this. What is it? Barb
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Barbara,

Does the white residue look like this?
[url=https://img260.imageshack.us/my.php?image=ficusspots4ut.jpg][img]https://img260.imageshack.us/img260/5197/ficusspots4ut.th.jpg[/img][/url]
These are hard water spots, leftovers from misting. It is nothing to worry about in and of itself but is an indicator of hard water which can be a problem for certain species. The other option is that it is salts from the fertilizer you have been using.

I'm having a hard time understanding exactly how often you have been fertilizing each of your trees but I get the impression that it is fairly frequently, perhaps too frequently. When you are able to post pictures please consider starting a new thread for each tree we are discussing, thanks.

Do the insects troubling you look like this?
[img]https://bugguide.net/images/raw/YHUHRR6HHRUH9ZEH3HIL8ZMLNZNHRRNHWZXLUZILUZML9Z5LUZWHFHXH5Z7H1HXH6ZGLBZ5LVZWH.jpg[/img]
If so check out this thread:
https://www.helpfulgardener.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=7278

Norm

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:D Yes and yes, i did not get a real close look at the bug, but it seems to match. i just got Orthenex. It is supposed to kill everything and not harm the trees. The White residue does match that white on the picture. I have a low nitrogen formula fertilizer that is supposed to be safe daily, but i do not give it daily...anymore. I did in the beginning when I first pruned. We have a friend of the family who is an arborist, who said the same, that it may be too much fertilizer, but the backyard here has bugs that love low nitrogen fertilizer. so maybe I should try to use the water filter more for the Bonsais, or use boiled, then cooled, like distilled for everything, not just for the Gardenias. I will start splitting all the plants. It is getting too big. Barb
BARBARA MARTIN

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