BonsaiNorge
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Bonsai in Norway!

Hi!

A month ago, I suddenly got the idea that I want to master the art of bonsai. Reading some information on the internet about growth-zones, convincing myself that I really wanted this, here I am.
First of all, I am a very patient person

I live in West-Norway. It raines 2 out of 3 days. In the winter the temperature sometimes is down to -5 degrees Celsius. In summer the temperature somtimes is up to +30 degrees celsius. But most of the year the temperature is between 8-18 degrees.

Mistake 1. I bought seeds. (Wisteria sinensis, acer ginnala, cotoneaster horizontalis, Jack pine) I have now sown 3 seeds of wisteria in small ceramic pots, located in my livingroom-window. And I have 4 jack pine seeds in the refrigerator. The questions are: Should I place the pots outside, or can I keep them in my window? Second, am I doing this at the wrong time of the year? (acer ginnala and cotoneaster horizontalis has a 60 days stratifying period)

Mistake 2. I was not aware of the fact that you have to keep the plants outside. My outside area is not too big, and square facing South, which gives a light-period in summer from 10:00 to 14:00. I have tried to read litterature about my seed-species, but I don't have any flexibility in regards of the light because of my location.

I have read the other posts in this forum about seeds and so on, very helpful. But I could really need some personal guidance.

PS: If, and I hope it will, the seeds germinate, I will create a blog with my trees. With pictures, information and experiences to help others. I will keep you updated about this if there is any interest.

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Gnome
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BonsaiNorge,

Hello and welcome to the forum and bonsai.
The questions are: Should I place the pots outside, or can I keep them in my window? Second, am I doing this at the wrong time of the year? (acer ginnala and cotoneaster horizontalis has a 60 days stratifying period)
Yes you are doing this at the wrong time of year, spring is the time to start seeds. You can keep them outside for now but the weather will turn before they will have much of a chance to grow or harden off. You will have to provide other arrangements to grow indoors, meaning supplemental lighting.

The species you mention are not well suited to indoor culture. Furthermore, Wisteria is a poor choice to grow from seed. They can be very slow to flower, perhaps a decade.

You might be better off to sacrifice this effort. The small investment you have in the seeds may be lost but consider it a cheap lesson, do your research first.
I was not aware of the fact that you have to keep the plants outside. My outside area is not too big, and square facing South, which gives a light-period in summer from 10:00 to 14:00. I have tried to read litterature about my seed-species, but I don't have any flexibility in regards of the light because of my location.
It sounds as if you would be better off growing tropicals or sub-tropicals. There are many choices available. Look [url=https://bonsaihunk.8m.com/cultural.html]here[/url] for some ideas regarding indoor culture, Jerry grows indoors all year.

Some more information to continue your research.

[url]https://www.bonsai4me.com/Basics.html[/url]
[url]https://www.evergreengardenworks.com/articles.htm[/url]

Norm

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do you know any german

BonsaiNorge
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Re: Gnome

Gnome wrote:BonsaiNorge,

Hello and welcome to the forum and bonsai.
The questions are: Should I place the pots outside, or can I keep them in my window? Second, am I doing this at the wrong time of the year? (acer ginnala and cotoneaster horizontalis has a 60 days stratifying period)

Thanks for quick and good answering!

But I still wonder. What will happen if I keep the sown seeds indoor until it germinates. And then take it outside in march-april ??? Will they survive?

I have read somewhere, that it is the second year of the plant that determinates what will happen to it?

I read about wisteria before buying the seeds. 5-10 years before blooming. As i wrote in my first post, I am a very patient man :)

What about outdoors stratifying? I soak the seeds in nov/dec, and then I set them outside, and they will get a stratifying period outside for two/three months?

And at last: Is 4 hours with sun really too little? Everywhere I look in my city/area, there are trees growing. I thought trees were a bit more hardy?

In advance, thanks!

BonsaiNorge
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LOL

Striferitus wrote:do you know any german
Are you asking this because Germany and Norway lies "right next to each other in Europe" ?

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BonsaiNorge,
Thanks for quick and good answering!
You're welcome.
What will happen if I keep the sown seeds indoor until it germinates.
This is not a problem, it is what happens after they germinate that is problematic.
And then take it outside in march-april ??? Will they survive?
My concern with this approach is the low level of light they will be receiving until you get them outside, and even once outside in your locale. By taking this approach you will have also gone against the natural cycle WRT to dormancy.
I have read somewhere, that it is the second year of the plant that determinates what will happen to it?
I have written this more than once here but I was not the first to make this observation. This refers to the future nebari (exposed root-spread that gives the impression of stability and age) that is difficult to find in nursery or collected material. In other words it is very important to handle the roots correctly beginning at the first re-potting, which most often occurs at the beginning of the second year.
I read about wisteria before buying the seeds. 5-10 years before blooming. As I wrote in my first post, I am a very patient man
As long as you know what you are up against.
What about outdoors stratifying? I soak the seeds in nov/dec, and then I set them outside, and they will get a stratifying period outside for two/three months?
You can stratify in more than one way. You can manage it all yourself in the refrigerator or cold garage. Or you can plant the seeds outside in the fall and let nature take its course.
And at last: Is 4 hours with sun really too little? Everywhere I look in my city/area, there are trees growing. I thought trees were a bit more hardy?
I thought you mentioned 6 hours before. Regardless, it does seem like a rather low level of light to me. But as you point out you have native trees that grow where you are. If you are determined to pursue bonsai in the traditional manner, outside, perhaps you should consider working with native species that are already acclimated to your environment. You will have to experiment and see what you can grow and what you cannot.

Norm
Last edited by Gnome on Tue Sep 04, 2007 12:58 am, edited 1 time in total.

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Welcome to the forum, BonsaiNorge! :)

Great to have you here.
;)

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i know a little bit and that is why i was aking you

BonsaiNorge
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Striferitus wrote:I know a little bit and that is why I was aking you
Well, when I took "a higher education" in Norway, I had to learn to speak/write german for 4 years. I still remember some, but not all :)

Ich bin ausländer und spreche nicht gut deutsch :D

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And at last: Is 4 hours with sun really too little? Everywhere I look in my city/area, there are trees growing. I thought trees were a bit more hardy?
I suggest you go the route of Ficus, some species produce aerial roots, and your sun situation would be good for producing them. On Jerry's site Norm linked to, it says that with a lot of shade (either form the canopy or reg. shade), and humid weather, aerial roots will develop, and i can testify to that. This Ficus https://www.helpfulgardener.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=5571 is getting a few hours of morning sun, then filtered light the rest of the day, and we had a humid spell for about 2 weeks, and this thing is growing aerial roots like crazy. However, i feel the humidity is key. I am just sharing this info partly to testify to Jerry's info, and partly to suggest Ficus as a beginner bonsai, as they are very forgiving when it comes to watering and lighting, but under certain conditions, they will flourish.

Joe

P.S. if anyone wants to see pics of the roots, just let me know i'll be happy to take some, and post them in the thread picturing the tree.

BonsaiNorge
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I suggest you go the route of Ficus, some species produce aerial roots, and your sun situation would be good for producing them.
Well, I looked at the link, and I must say the ficus was impressive. But a ficus is not the plant that I want. I know of many other trees to that would be appropriate for my situation, like fir, pine, birch or beech. But I don't want a regular tree.

And I am very aware of the fact that I am a beginner. This means that I will probably be disappointed when I choose such difficult species, but I will learn more from it.

I am also moving in ten months, don't know where to yet, but hopefully somewhere with a bit more sun:)

Anyway, thanks for all of your help!

JoeLewko
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Well, I looked at the link, and I must say the ficus was impressive.
Thank You, but i can't take credit for that. The previous owner styled it that way, he agve it to me, because he was getting tired of taking care of his Bonsai (although I'm curious as to why he left that crossing branch).
But a ficus is not the plant that I want
That's fine. I was just sharing some experiences.

But I don't want a regular tree.
Just curious, what do you mean by that?
And I am very aware of the fact that I am a beginner. This means that I will probably be disappointed when I choose such difficult species, but I will learn more from it.
I consider myself a beginner, and i have acquired two pines, and the best thing you can do is research, research, research. I don't know if you will be disappointed, but rather frustrated if anything. As you say though, you will learn from it, as i am learning as well.

Joe[/quote]

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und du bist jahara alt. i think it is

Gut tag Ich heisse Max
meine duetch is schlect.

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