ynot
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gnome80 wrote:Hhhmmm It seems that I have been missunderstood here.

I have seen and been and read all the links provided and do remember all that was stated.

The submerging wasnt meant as in watering but just to give and idea of how poor the soil was and to give and idea how bad the tree was taken care of. (Bowing in respect and saying sorry for my poor explanation)
Misunderstood ~ Yes because the only info I have to go on is what you state - Not what you mean. Understand that using the submersion demonstrates primarily bad care not bad soil when the intent is far from clear.

I am glad you have been reading and stand up straight, Mr Miyagi is NOT in the room.:roll:
The question was for advice from you guys as in what type (not brand or anything) of soil would be your thought.
I am not trying to be dense here but...What do you mean by 'type'? Proper bonsai soil.
The standard info linked wasnt enough for this case.
Straightforward questions please - I will do my best.

ANyway long story short not to cause any further upset, I'll go get a lamp and do some night reading and compare the links and some books.
Look, When you don't appear to have read it - I treat you as though you have not read it [But should have].
It is not an upsetting drama and the bold is for emphasis, It is that simple.
(Kneels and Begs for mercy)
:roll: This is not Shogun[img]https://www.mysmilie.de/english/green/smilies/angry/3/img/010.gif[/img].
tommywing wrote: I will happily admit that in the past I have skim read some of the info provided, decide that my question isn't answered and then ask a question in a forum, only to have it highlighted for me in something I didn't actually read!
Sure, Everybody misses stuff :shrug:. That is not why this happened though...:arrow:Moving on.
tommywing wrote: People get post happy, and lets face it, lazy, and that makes the people with the info fume!
True, Although :lol: I get post-UN-happy ;) [img]https://www.mysmilie.de/english/green/smilies/cheeky/2/img/028.gif[/img]

ynot

gnome80
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Ynot,


Ok i understand.

I have and still am reading every and anything you guys have posted.

I always take advice and opinion from others to heart and listen and follow them when needed and that is why I asked here for your (Ynot and Gnome's) advice for the soil.

The type in my question was meant as in fine to coarse. size of grain. In expirience what would best suited a small young chinese Elm like Tommy's.

Altho I still cant plainly explain all what I mean, next time I'll do better.

Cheers

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Gnome
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Tommywing,
Thanks for the advice, I see what you mean about the taper on the trunk, however I don't understand how you would achieve what you show in your virt.

Are you suggesting air layering the first branch on the right and then growing that into a tree like the one you showed?

What I have done in the virtual is to remove (layer) the straight section that I mentioned being too thick in relation to the part below it. I then "cheated" in that I re-used the base of the tree. In reality you would leave the roots and the right branch intact which then becomes it's own plant.

I don't know if you are familiar with air layering, I'm not even sure that you have enough room to do this. I was just sort of thinking out loud.

Norm

ynot
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gnome80 wrote:Ynot,
Ok I understand.
Glad to hear it 8) & do try not to read me too seriously...lol

I have and still am reading every and anything you guys have posted.
Ok, But get info elsewhere also. Overdose on info my man :D.
I always take advice and opinion from others to heart and listen and follow them when needed and that is why I asked here for your (Ynot and Gnome's) advice for the soil.

The type in my question was meant as in fine to coarse. size of grain. In expirience what would best suited a small young chinese Elm like Tommy's.
Understood, I do not use fine particles at all, Never, In no bonsai case whatsoever. There is my opinion on that. :)
Altho I still cant plainly explain all what I mean, next time I'll do better.

Cheers
Give it a shot

BTW - Here is a thread about why well draining larger particle soil is more appropriate for bonsai that may be of help to you [Or not ] :https://www.helpfulgardener.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=3530

ynot

tommywing
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Location: Godalming UK

here is an update of how my tree is progressing.

I am trying to create four clumps of growth around the centre, which I will try and make taller than the rest.

As you can see someone has chopped the trunk in the past, presumably to make another tree, I'm trying to promote as much rwoth around this as possible.

Snaps are still pretty dump, but they're purely demonstative!

https://img513.imageshack.us/my.php?image=img1954mu4.jpg

https://img154.imageshack.us/my.php?image=img1955dv2.jpg

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Gnome
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Tommywing,

The Elm looks like it is doing well. Glad to hear that you are having better luck with this one.

Norm

tommywing
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It certainly seems to be healthier, and is growing plenty of new shoots. I'm trying to root some of the branch cuttings as well, I was wondering how long to expect it to take for roots to appear, any ideas?

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Gnome
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Tommywing,
I was wondering how long to expect it to take for roots to appear, any ideas?
You just have to play it by ear. When/if new growth appears they are probably rooted but don't go messing about with them. The new rootlets are very delicate and easily damaged. In reality either they will die or they will root. Are you using rooting hormone?

By the way if you are lucky enough to get a new shoot below the reverse taper do not remove it or prune it back. By allowing such a branch to grow unrestricted for a few years you can begin to correct the reverse taper. It will be unsightly during the process but sometimes you have to go back before you can go forward.

Norm

tommywing
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Hi,

I am using rooting hormone yes, all the leaves on the cuttings are beginning to dry out, I was just after a rought estimate, i.e. weeks, months or years.

I am basically leaving all growth on the tree to grow as much as it can until it enters the space of another part of the tree, I will keep an eye out for shoots below the taper, but I don't see what they'd do?

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Gnome
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Tommywing,
I was just after a rought estimate, I.e. weeks, months or years.
OK then, weeks.
all the leaves on the cuttings are beginning to dry out,
Frequent misting will help. I have also kept cuttings under glass until they root.
I will keep an eye out for shoots below the taper, but I don't see what they'd do?
This is known as a sacrifice branch, it is an important technique for thickening the trunk or even branches of bonsai. Every branch serves to thicken the portion of the trunk that lies below it. By allowing one or more branches to grow in the area that needs to be thickened they will eventually increase the thickness of the trunk in that area. The sacrifice branches are allowed unrestricted growth for a period of time and then are removed, thus the term "sacrifice". It may take several branches, over a period of years to correct the flaw.

Norm

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